Messerschmitt Bf 110 List


Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 - NJG1


Aircrew Luftwaffe Bordfunker 3./NJG1 Erich Handke 01

Aircrew Luftwaffe Bordfunker s 4./NJG1 Johannes Richter 01

Aircrew Luftwaffe nightfighter ace Paul Gildner NJG1 01-02

Aircrew Luftwaffe pilot I./NJG1 Wilhelm Johnen 01-03

Aircrew Luftwaffe pilot III./NJG1 Wilhelm Johnen 01-03

Aircrew Luftwaffe pilot III./NJG1 Wilhelm Johnen July 1941 01

Aircrew Luftwaffe pilot NJG1 Wilhelm Herget 01

Aircrew Luftwaffe pilot NJG1 Wilhelm Herget 02

Aircrew Luftwaffe pilots I./NJG1 Wilhelm Johnen with Werner Streib June 1943 01

Aircrew Luftwaffe pilots NJG1 Wilhelm Herget June 1943 01

Messerschmitt Bf 110F Zerstörer NJG armourers 01-02

Photo's 01-02: The work of Luftwaffe ground crews, known as 'Black Men' because of the usual color of their overalls, was essential in ensuring aircraft remained operational. Here, a night fighter Gruppe's armourers are seen checking and servicing the four 7.92 mm MG 17 machine guns in the nose of a Bf 110F-4. Clearly visible in both photographs is the crest of the Nachtjagd.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer NJG1. (G9+ ) 1942 01

Photo 01: Prior to the installation of airborne radar, the German defence system relied on ground controllers directing night fighters to within visual range of their targets, hence the lack of any antennae on this Bf 110 of NJG1, seen in Holland in 1942, with the then standard night fighter finish of overall black with code letters in grey.

Messerschmitt Bf 110C Zerstörer NJG1 Sktz KD+TB W.Nr 2132 01

Photo 01: Bf 110C2, KD+TB, W Nr. 2132, that has previously been deployed to towing duties. Seen here with NJG Schule 1, it carries the number '10' on the rear fuselage and an unidentified emblem on the nose. The towing features, of rear view mirrors ahead of the pilots' windscreen, enlarged radiators (required due to the low speed involving in towing huge transport aircraft) and shortened rear fuselage housing the pulley system. This Bf 110 retained its early-war style solid upper surface camouflage.

Messerschmitt Bf 110 C-6 1./NJG1 G9+EH based in Venlo Air Base Netherlands February 1942
Artwork Messerschmitt Bf 110D Zerstorer 1./NJG1 (G9+EH) Venlo Air Base Holland Feb 1942 0A

Photo 01: Messerschmitt Bf 110 C-6 1./NJG1 G9+EH based in Venlo Air Base Netherlands February 1942

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Artwork Bf 110G Zerstorer 7./NJG6 (2Z+FR) Wilhem Johnen Neubiberg 1945 0D
Artwork Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstorer 6./NJG1 (G9+GP) Helmut Niklas 0A
Artwork Messerschmitt Bf 110G4 12./NJG1 (G9+EZ) St Trond Belgium Feb 1944 0A
Artwork Messerschmitt Bf 110G Zerstorer 9./NJG1 (G9+AT) 0A
BW Messerschmitt Bf 110D3 Zerstorer 7./NJG1 (G9+DR) Nort Sea 1940 01-02
BW Messerschmitt Bf 110D Zerstorer 7./NJG1 (G9+MR) 01
BW Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstorer 7./NJG1 (G9+BR) Wolfgang Thimmig 01-02
BW Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstorer 7./NJG1 (G9+ER) 01
Claims Blenheim MkIV RAF 105Sqn GB X T1895 shot down by Paul Gildner Mar 1st 1941 01
Claims Blenheim MkIV RAF 110Sqn R2278 shot down by Paul Gildner Mar 13th 1941 01
Claims Vickers Wellington MkIc RAF 115Sqn KO P X9873 force landed Holland Nov 1st 1941 01
Claims Wellington RAF 214Sqn BU M N2746 shot down by Paul Gildner Mar 13th 1941 01
Claims Whitley RAF 58Sqn T4145 shot down by Paul Gildner Apr 8th 1941 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110C Zerstorer 4./NJG1 G9+HM Paul Gildner Rudi Muller Leeuwarden 01-02
Messerschmitt Bf 110C Zerstorer 6./NJG1 (G9+GP) Niklas WNr 2654 1942 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110C Zerstorer 8./NJG1 (G9+BS) Operation Donnerkeil 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110C Zerstorer 8./NJG1 (G9+DS) Operation Donnerkeil 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110C Zerstorer Stab I./NJG1 Sktz KD+TB WNr 2132 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110D 4./NJG1 G9+FM with FuG 202 Leeuwarden 1942 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110D 4./NJG1 G9+HM WNr 4384 landing accident Herdla 20th Feb 1942
Messerschmitt Bf 110D Zerstorer 6./NJG1 Deelen Holland 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110D Zerstorer NJG1 (G9+ ) 1942 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110E2 5./NJG1 (G9+LN) Heinz Wolfgang Schnaufer St Trond Belgium 1942 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110E2 5./NJG1 (G9+LN) Heinz Wolfgang Schnaufer St Trond Belgium 1942 0A-0B
Messerschmitt Bf 110E2 Zerstorer 6./NJG1 (G9+AP) Birkenstock 3737 crash Feb 24 1942 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstorer 4./NJG1 (G9+JM) Operation Donnerkeil Belgium 1942 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstorer 4./NJG1 (G9+JM) Operation Donnerkeil Belgium 1942 0A-0D
Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstorer 6./NJG1 (G9+CP) Deelen Arnhem 01-03
Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstorer 9./NJG1 (G9+ET) Schleswig 1941 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110F4 Zerstorer 4./NJG1 (G9+EM) undergoing gun testing 1942 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110F4 Zerstorer 9./NJG1 (G9+GT) in flight 1942 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110F4 Zerstorer 9./NJG1 (G9+LT) in flight 1942 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110F Zerstorer I./NJG1 1943 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110F Zerstorer NJG armourers 02-03
Messerschmitt Bf 110F Zerstorer NJG G9+Fx armourers 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110G4R3B2M2 9./NJG1 (G9+AT) WNr 160616 FuG220 Fritzlar 1945 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110G4R3B2M2 9./NJG1 (G9+HT) WNr 160128 FuG220 Fritzlar 1945 01-03
Messerschmitt Bf 110G4R3B2M2 9./NJG1 (G9+ST) WNr 160535 FuG220 Fritzlar 1945 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110G4 Zerstorer 8./NJG1 (G9+VS) WNr 110509 Bad Langensalza Germany 1945 01-02
Messerschmitt Bf 110G4 Zerstorer 8./NJG1 (G9+VS) WNr 110509 Bad Langensalza Germany 1945 0A-0B
Messerschmitt Bf 110G4 Zerstorer NJG1 in flight 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110G Zerstorer 6./NJG1 (G9+JP) Gustav Sarzio Kaiserswerth Dusseldorf 1944 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110G Zerstorer 8./NJG1 (G9+CS) 01
Messerschmitt Bf 110 Zerstorer 5./NJG1 (G9+DN) Belgium 1941 01

Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 I.Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 - I./NJG1

Messerschmitt Bf 110F Zerstörer I./NJG1 1943 01

Photo 01: An unusually camouflaged Bf 110F of I./NJG1, probably in the spring of 1943, showing the aerials for the Lichtenstein airborne radar. Note also the dark upper surface coloring which extended down the fuselage side to terminate in an undulating demarcation line. Also of interest is the outer undersurface of the starboard wing which appears to have been painted white, the finish paint accentuating the grime which has accumulated on the white of the Balkenkreuz.

Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 II.Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 - II./NJG1

Messerschmitt Bf 110C Zerstörer 4 Staffel II./NJG1 pilot Paul Gildner 01

Photo 01: Although possibly accentuated by the bright light which enabled this night photograph to be taken, this view of a Bf-110 shows the uneven finish sometimes seen on Luftwaffe night fighters. Such an appearance could result from an overspray in varying densities on the aircraft's original camouflage colors, although normal weathering would also be an additional factor. The pilot seen here entering the cockpit of his machine is believed to be Ofw. Paul Gildner of NJG1.

Luftwaffe ace II./NJG1 pilot Paul Gildner 01

Photo 01: Ofw. Paul Gildner of 3./NJG1 shot down a Hampden bomber on the night of 2/3 September 1940 and achieved one of the first recorded night victories of the war. He was one of the early innovators in the organisation and his loss on 24 February 1943 was keenly felt.

Messerschmitt Bf 110C Zerstörer 4./NJG 1 (G9+HM) Werk. no. 4384 previously flown by Paul Gildner Febr-Mar 1941

Photo 01: Bf 110 from 4./NJG 1 (G9+HM) Werk. no. 4384, that got problems at landing at Herdla 20th February 1942. This photo may also have been taken at Westerland-Sylt. This A/C was a part of the cover for Prinz Eugen and Admiral Scheer under operation Donnerkeil

Claims Blenheim MkIV RAF 105Sqn GB-X T1895 shot down by Paul Gildner Mar 1st 1941 [2 KIA 1 POW]

Photo 01: Blenheim MkIV RAF 105Sqn GB-X T1895 was on a mission to Wilhelmshaven. It took-off from Swanton Morley Feb 28th 1941 at 2325 and was later shot down by Paul Gildner around 0258 and crashed Oosterhogebrug (Groningen, 5km East of Groningen Holland. Crew Sgt J S H Heape POW, Sgt S Jones and Sgt J Bimson both KIA

Claims Blenheim MkIV RAF 110Sqn R2278 shot down by Paul Gildner Mar 13th 1941 [3 KIA]

Photo 01: Blenheim MkIV RAF 110Sqn VE- R2278 was on a mission to Hamburg. It took-off from Wattisham Mar 13th 1941 at 2027 and was later shot down by Paul Gildner around 2248 and crashed Tolbert (Groningen, 14km SW of Groningen Holland. All crew are buried in the General Cemetery at Esserveld Groningen. F/L J Dickinson DFC, Sgt C W Fry, Sgt R Mower all KIA

Claims Wellington MkIC RAF 214Sqn BU-M N2746 shot down by Paul Gildner Mar 13th 1941 [5 KIA 1 POW]

Photo 01: Wellington MkIC RAF 214Sqn BU-M N2746 was on a mission to Hamburg. It took-off from Stradishall Mar 13th 1941 at 2000 and was later shot down by Paul Gildner around 2248 and crashed Groningen Holland. 5 KIA 1 POW. Killed were Sgt A G Elder, Sgt V L Bagley, Sgt S Glazer RNZAF, Sgt J B Tomkinson, Sgt G C Daniel all are buried in the General Cemetery at Esserveld Groningen except for Sgt D W Waters POW.

Claims Whitley MkV RAF 58Sqn GE-P T4145 shot down by Paul Gildner crashed Waterhuizen Apr 8th 1941 [4 KIA 1 POW]

Photo 01: Whitley V RAF 58Sqn GE-P T4145 was on a mission to Keil. It took-off from Linton-on-Ouse Apr 7th 1941 at 2055 and was later shot down by Paul Gildner around 0027 Apr 8th 1941 and crashed Waterhuizen Groningen, 7 km SW of Groningen, Holland. 4 KIA 1 POW. Killed were P/O R McC Carrapiett, Sgt A J White, P/O C F Jones, Sgt A R Mason POW, Sgt A C Wroath all are buried in the General Cemetery at Esserveld Groningen except for Sgt A R Mason POW.

Claims Wellington MkIA RAF 115 Sqn KO-P X9873 W/O W B Snowden force landed Schiermonnikoog 31st Oct 1941 [6 POW]

Photo 02: Vickers Wellington Mk.IA RAF 115 Squadron KO-P X9873 flown by W/O W B Snowden force landed Schiermonnikoog Holland 31st Oct 1941. The aircraft took off from Marham 1750 for a raid on Bremen. However it was shot down 2130 by Ofw Paul Gildner from 4./NJG1 with his radio operator Rudi Muller based at Leeuwarden Bf 110 with fuselage code G9+HM) and crashlanded Schiermonnikoog which is an island, a municipality, and a national park in the northern Netherlands. Schiermonnikoog is one of the West Frisian Islands, and is part of the province of Friesland. W/O W B Snowden was a very senior NCO. The crew all became POW's W/O W B Snowden, Sgt H E Woolley RCAF, Sgt A E Robinson, Sgt P V Brazier RCAF, Sgt A W Clarke RCAF, F/S P J C Darvill

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 4./NJG1 (G9+JM) Operation Donnerkeil Belgium 1942 01

Photo 01: This aircraft belonged to 4./NJG1 and is reported to have taken part in Operation Donnerkeil, for which purpose the uppersurfaces were re-camouflaged in a green finish more appropriate for operations over the sea. Note again the white rear fuselage band, possibly applied for the operation to identify the aircraft as friendly to the German warships.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer II./NJG1 Deelen-Arnhem 01

Photo 01: Luftwaffe technical ground staff refueling a Bf 110 of II./NJG1 at Deelen-Arnhem in the autumn of 1940. The aircraft is camouflaged black overall and the machine's individual aircraft letter has been applied to the nose. Note also the Roman II adjacent to the Englandblitz emblem.

Messerschmitt Bf 110G Zerstörer II./NJG1 pilot Adolf Breves 01

Photo 01: The tail of Hptm. Adolf Breves' Bf 110G night fighter showing his victory tally in June 1944.This pilot flew with Stab IV/NJG1 and, on the night of 21/22 June, shot down three RAF Lancaster bombers which raised his tally to ten victories. Note the meticulous book-keeping, each victory being represented by a white victory bar, within which is a silhouette of a four-engined bomber together with a note of the type destroyed and the date of the victory. Hptm. Breves later flew with II./NJG1, and although records exist showing he was finally credited with 17 victories, it is possible he may have destroyed another in the final months of the war which was not confirmed.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 5./NJG1 (G9+IN) 1941 01

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 'Dackelbauch' 5.NJG1 (G9+JN) Deelen Holland 1941

NJG 1 used several aircraft equipped for long range flights with the large, under-fuselage tank housing 1050 lit rs of fuel and 106 lit rs of oil, known as 'Dackelbauch'. Aircraft equipped in this manner were intended for use in day operations over water, but combat experience showed that, due to performance penalties and vulnerabilities, this arrangement was disappointing. As a result, it was decided to use the units on aircraft used for night ops. Abig disadvantage of the tank was that it could not be jettisoned in the event of an emergency, and so were replaced by aircraft with wing racks. This aircraft, with a single color night scheme, carried the emblem of NJG 1. From published photos, it is not clear if this specific plane carried the Roman numeral 'II' behind the emblem, designating it as a machine of II. Gruppe. Some carried it, others did not.

NJG 1 používala i několik strojů vybavených pro dálkové lety zvětšenou podtrupovou nádrží s obsahem 1050 litrů paliva a 106 litrů oleje označovaných jako "Dackelbauch". Takto vybavené letouny byly původně určené pro denní operace nad mořem, ale jejich bojové použití ukázalo , že pro zhoršené letové vlastnosti a přílišnou zranitelnost nejsou na toto nasazení vhodné. Proto bylo rozhodnuto využít je při nočních akcích. Velkou nevýhodou byla nemožnost odhodit nádrž v případě nouze, a tyto stroje byly rychle nahrazeny novějšími typy se závěsníky pod křídlem. Stroj v jednobarevné noční kamufláži nesl na přídi emblém NJG 1. Z publikovaných fotografií stroje není zřejmé, zda byla na trupu za tímto emblémem i římská číslice II, označující stroje II.Gruppe. Některé stroje ji nesly, jiné ne.

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Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 5./NJG1 (G9+LN) Heinz-Wolfgang Schnaufer Belgium 1940-41

Photo 01: These aircraft belonged to 5./NJG1.

email

Email received from Fed Hill Sep 14th 2012

Oblt Schnaufer's Kill number 36 should be DV329 (KM-W) of 44 Sqn Dunholm Lodge pilot Flt.Lt Charles Ellison Hill. There is a general error on most web sites showing the 36th kill as Lancaster III (JB537) "PH-N" of 12 Sqn, RAF, 6 killed, 1 POW. JB537 (PH-N) was lost at 22:00hrs by Flak and crashed at Vrees Killing all on board - no survivors. Schnaufer shot down DV329 (KM-W) at 19:00 at Lorup and the plane crashed near Rastdorf only the Mid Upper Gunner (KIRWAN) survived the crash. Please see the attached MACR report which shows Cockade N (JB537 PH-N) was lost by flak not Schnaufer. The book Nachtjagd War Diaries vol 1 (page 303) has the correct aircraft. DV329 was my great uncles aircraft. Thanks to Fred Hill

6. Staffel II. Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 1

Messerschmitt Bf 110D Zerstörer 6./NJG1 Deelen Holland 01

Photo 01: The Bf 110D-0 was developed as a specialised long-range heavy fighter in the spring of 1940. It featured a 1,050 litre auxiliary fuel tank in a large plywood and fabric fairing under the forward fuselage which resulted in the nickname 'Dackelbauch', or 'Dachshund's Belly' and required the two MG FF cannon in the lower forward fuselage to be removed. The type first saw service with the Zerstorer units but was not popular due to the explosive fumes which remained in the tank when empty. Nevertheless, and despite the reduced forward firing armament, II./NJG1 operated the Bf 110D-0, D-1, Do-2 and D-3 sub-types throughout 1942 until it largely disappeared from the Gruppe's inventory at the end of the year. This particular example, which is believed to have flown with 6./NJG1 at Deelen in 1941 or 1942, is camouflaged in a black night finish although the fuselage fuel tank is clearly still blue 65.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E2 6./NGJ1 (G9+AP) Birkenstock 3737 crash Feb 24 1942 01

Photo shows the crash of Bf 110E2 6./NGJ1 (G9+AP) WNr. 3737 crashed Feb 24 1942 Pilot Lt Hans-Jorg Birkenstock and crew Johann Weiker and Ofw Gerhard Lange had engine trouble after take-off and crashed three miles from base. Miraculously all crew survied the crash. However Lt Hans-Jorg Birkenstock would be killed after accumulating 7 victories on the night of May 20 1944.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 6./NJG1 (G9+CP)

Photo 01: An overall black Bf 110 of 6./NJG1 with the fuselage markings G9+CP. Note, however, that the Staffelletter 'P' has been repeated on the upper wingtip instead of the individual aircraft letter 'C'.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstorer 6./NJG1 (G9+GP) pilot Helmut Niklas WNr 2654 May 1942 01

Photo 01: This Bf 110E-1of 6./NJG1 is the aircraft which the wounded Lt. Helmut Niklas crash-landed after shooting down two Wellington bombers on the night of 30/31 May 1942. As the Wellingtons were the pilot's fIrst two victories, the existence of a single white victory bar on the vertical tail unit of this machine would therefore suggest that G9+GP was not his regular aircraft. The fuselage code letters are grey 77 and the aircraft's individual letter 'G' has been narrowly edged in yellow, the Staffel color. Note that the abrasive action of the grass has worn away the black finish on the nose to reveal the 65 or 76 of the original factory finish.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstorer 6./NJG1 (G9+GP) pilot Helmut Niklas

Messerschmitt Bf 110G Zerstörer 6./NJG1 (G9+JP) pilot Gustav Sarzio Kaiserswerth-Düsseldorf Oct 1944

Photo 01: This Bf 110G-4 of 6./NJG1 was photographed at Kaiserswerth-Düsseldorf in October 1944. Pictured with the aircraft is the pilot, Uffz. Gustav Sarzio, and hisWrr operator, Heinz Conrands.Their machine was coded G9+JP and was lost in the evening of 4 November 1944 when it was shot down over M6nchengladbach, possibly by an RAF Mosquito. Sarzio, who then had five victories, was wounded, but Conrands was killed.

Bordfunkers 4./NJG1 Johannes Richter

Photo 01: One of the most successful Bordfunkers in the Nachtjagd was Ofw. Johannes Richter, who participated in 67 kills and was decorated with the Knight's Cross on 30 September 1944. Richter joined 4./NJG1 in the spring of 1941 and was crewed with Rudolf Schonert, with whom he flew for the remainder of the war.


Bordfunker III./NJG1 Erich Handke

"After a long burst of f1re it went down in flames from 5,500 metres with all of its bombs on board"

UNTEROFFIZIER ERICH HANDKE, III./NJG 1

Erich Handke was trained as a Bordfunker during 1941/42 and was posted to 12./NJG1 in October 1942. Handke first flew with Fw. George Kraft and they participated in 14 victories together. On 17/18August 1943, they were attacked and shot down by an RAF Beaufighter, flown by the British night fighter ace, Wing Commander 'Bob' Braham. Kraft was killed during the attack, but Handke was able to parachute to safety. He then went on to fly briefly with Heinz Schnaufer and Karl-Heinz Scherfling, before being transferred to III./NJG1 where he crewed with Martin Drewes for the remainder of the war. On 27 July 1944, he and Drewes each received the Knight's Cross, Handke thus becoming one of the very few Bordfunkers to receive this decoration. When hostilities ceased in May 1945, he had participated in 59 victories, three of which were claimed during the day.

During the raid on Nuremberg on 30 March 1944, incoming bombers were reported and we took off for the radio beacon 'Ida' near Aachen. We didn't think we had reached the bomber stream when 'Schorsch' Petz [the gunner] saw a bomber flying above us. As we were turning onto an easterly heading, I switched on the SN-2 and immediately three targets appeared. I gave directions for the nearest one. Then Drewes saw it at 600 metres. The weather was excellent: a starlit sky, a half moon, small clouds and no mist. It was simply ideal, almost too bright.

It was a Lancaster, flying beautifully straight ahead, so that we were easily able to position ourselves beneath it. From about 50 metres Drewes fired with our 'Schrage Musik'and its port wing immediately caught fire. Five minutes later the Lancaster came down with a huge explosion in the middle of an area where the attack was just beginning, probably Aachen.

We continued our flight on a heading of 100 degrees until, after ten minutes, we picked up another single target far above us on a similar heading. Until then we had been flying at an altitude of 5,500 metres, but now we had to climb a long time until we reached the Lancaster, which was flying at 7,000 metres. Once again we positioned ourselves 50 metres below our target, but our cannon jammed after only two rounds and we were tillable to clear it. However, the Lancaster must have been hit, because all at once it lost height. We had not dived away, so it probably saw us, because it then suddenly curved steeply away.

We immediately went down beneath it whilst it was flying very slowly at a height of 5,500 metres. Now we had to climb to attack in the old way, from astern, where one is exposed to the rear gunner's fire. We were now accustomed to the new 'Schrage Musik' attack method, as it was a far safer technique. This time we wanted to fire directly into the wing, because the fuselage, with its many bombs, was too dangerous.

At last, Drewes climbed to the correct height and from 50 metres fired into the starboard wing, which immediately began to burn. Although we did not break away immediately, the Lancaster crew apparently had no time for defensive action because it went into a dive and exploded into many pieces. Below there lay a field scattered with many incendiary bombs. We were somewhere in the Vogelsberg area.

Around us, there were still bombers going down like flies. After some time we picked up yet another target and followed it. Drewes saw the target, a Lancaster, at a distance of 700 metres. In the meanwhile, we had been able to reload one of the upward-firing cannon, so once more we positioned ourselves 50 metres beneath it. After a long burst it went down in flames from 5,500 metres with all of its bombs on board. Two men were able to bale out before it crashed about 20 kilometres to the north of Bamberg. As we had run out of contacts we flew back and landed at Hanau-Langendiebach, where a further 40 crews joined us.

Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 7. Staffel III. Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 - 7./NJG1


Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 7./NJG1 (G9+BR) Hptm. Wolfgang Thimmig who was Gruppenkommandeur for III./NJG1

Photos: 01-02: Two views of G9+BR, also with its individual aircraft letter outlined in white and with white spinner tips.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 7./NJG1 (G9+ER)

Photo 01: A Bf 110E of 7./NJG1 coded G9+ER. Note the entire spinners appear to be white, which corresponds to the Staffel color, whereas G9+DR has only the spinner tips painted white. The individual aircraft letter on both machines has also been outlined white.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 7./NJG1 (G9+ER)

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 7./NJG1 (G9+DR) 01

Photo 01: A Bf 110E of 7./NJG1 coded G9+ER. Note the entire spinners appear to be white, which corresponds to the Staffel color, whereas G9+DR has only the spinner tips painted white. The individual aircraft letter on both machines has also been outlined white.

Messerschmitt Bf 110C Zerstörer 7./NJG1 (G9+MR)

Photo 01: Similarly anomalous are the yellow wingtip and fuselage band on G9+MR of 7./NJG1. These cannot be easily explained but were certainly intended as some form of recognition aid as opposed to a theatre marking. It is, however, interesting to note that while some units were taking all precautions to eliminate any bright areas on their machines, even to the extent of overpainting the thin white outline to the swastikas on the tails of their aircraft, others not only retained the white of the national insignia but added large areas of white or yellow.

Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 8. Staffel III. Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 - 8./NJG1

Messerschmitt Bf 110C Zerstörer 8./NJG1 (G9+BS) Operation Donnerkeil 01

Photo 01: A number of photographs depicting night fighters belonging to units known only to have been based in the West show the application of theatre markings normally associated with the Eastern Front or the Mediterranean. The white band around the rear fuselage and the white under the wingtips of G9+BS, a Bf 110C of 8./NJG1, are therefore unusual but may have been applied as a recognition aid during Operation 'Donnerkeil' when the battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen sailed from France to Germany via the English Channel.

Messerschmitt Bf 110G Zerstörer 8./NJG1 (G9+CS)

Photo 01: A detailed view of the flame dampers on a Bf 110G night fighter. Whereas the starboard inner flame dampers directed the exhaust gases under the wing, the other three dampers led over the wings and often resulted in heavy black deposits, as shown on G9+CS of 8./NJG1.

Messerschmitt Bf 110G Zerstörer 8./NJG1 (G9+VS) W.Nr 110509 Bad Langensalza 1945

Photo's 01-02: This abandoned Bf 110G-4 was found by US forces at Bad Langensalza in April or May 1945. This particular machine, W.Nr 110509, flown by 8./NJG1, was coded G9+VS and lacked any radar aerials when photographed. On the starboard side, just visible protruding from the underside of the nose in the photograph is the small plate which ensured that spent cartridge cases were deflected away from the propeller.

Profile 0A: Revi Magazine 77

Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 9. Staffel III. Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 - NJG1


Messerschmitt Bf 110G Zerstörer 9./NJG1 (G9+AT) 01

Photo 01: This Bf 110G, G9+AT, had 76 mottling clearly applied over 75 on all uppersurfaces, while G9+HT, WNr. 160128, was finished in 76 overall with a mottle of 75 over the uppersurfaces.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 9./NJG1 (G9+BT) Schleswig 1941

Photo 01: Bf 110 night fighters of 9./NJG1, apparently at Schleswig in early 1941. Note the unusual presentation of the fuselage Balkenkreuz on G9+BT in the foreground and also on G9+HT and G9+ET behind it.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 9./NJG1 (G9+ET) Schleswig 1941

Photo 01: Bf 110 night fighters of 9./NJG1, apparently at Schleswig in early 1941. Note the unusual presentation of the fuselage Balkenkreuz on G9+BT in the foreground and also on G9+HT and G9+ET behind it.

Messerschmitt Bf 110E Zerstörer 9./NJG1 (G9+HT) Schleswig 1941 01

Photo 01: Bf 110 night fighters of 9./NJG1, apparently at Schleswig in early 1941. Note the unusual presentation of the fuselage Balkenkreuz on G9+BT in the foreground and also on G9+HT behind it.

Messerschmitt Bf 110G Zerstorer NJG6 (G9+HT) W.Nr 160128 Fritzler Germany, April 1945

Photo 01: Me-110G-4/R3, unknown pilot of 9./NJG 1, Fritzler/Germany, April 1945.

Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 V. Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 - V./NJG1

Messerschmitt Bf 110G 12./NJG1 Heinz-Wolfgang Schnaufer WNr 720260

Photo 01: Oblt. Heinz-Wolfgang Schnaufer of 12./NJG1 photographed at St. Trond in February 1944 with the tail of his Bf 110G, WNr. 720260, which was then marked with 47 victory bars. The last of these victories were all claimed on the night of 15/16 February when, between 22.58 and 23.33 hrs, Schnaufer shot down three Lancasters. Schnaufer ended the war with the rank of Major and a total of 121 night victories claimed in only 164 sorties. He was awarded the Ritterkreuz in December 1943, the Oak Leaves in June 1944, the Swords a month later and the Diamonds on 16 October 1944 when he reached 100 victories. Post-war, Schnaufer was seriously injured in a road accident in France on 13 July 1950 and died two days later.


Luftwaffe Badge

Paul Gildner

Units: I/ZG-1, 4/NJG-1 (2/41, II/NJG-2 (1/42, IV/NJG-1, 2/NJG-1 (1/43, Stfkpt 3/NJG-1 (2/43)

Awards: RK(7/9/41)-EL(2/26/43, DK-G(5/25/42, EK 1 & 2, Night Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 110C, Bf 110G-4 WNr 4876 'G9+HH' (lost 2/24/43)

Remarks: One known victory, perhaps his 1st, a Blenheim at Groningen the night of February 28-March 1, 1941. Nos. 2 & 3, a Blenheim at Tolbert, W of Groningen and a Wellington at Burlanger, the night of 13-14 March, 1941. A 4th, a Whitley 8 km SE of Groningen, the night of 3-4 April, 1941. A Wellington the night of 9-10 April, 1941, no location. A Whitley the night of 8-9 May, 1941, no location. On 19 June, 1941, he downed three AC; two Wellingtons and a Whitley. A Whitley the night of 29-30 June, 1941. A Whitley on 13 October, 1941. A Wellington at Schiermonikoog and a Whitley N of Texel Island on 31 October, 1941. A Hampden I of RAF No. 49 Sg. 5 km NE of Groningen Holland the night of 20-21 January, 1942. Four Day victories as a destroyer pilot with I/ZG-1. Began his military career as an Infantry officer in 1934. 44 Night victories. Killed 23/24 February, 1943 over Gilze-Rijen Holland in a fatal crash at Dongen (in de vennen) due to an engine fire and explosion. Burial: Block M, Row 4, Grave 81.

Asisbiz database list of aerial victories for Paul Gildner

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
Tuesday, September 03, 1940 Paul Gildner 3.NJG1 Hampden   00:45 9km S. Sittard
Wednesday, September 18, 1940 Paul Gildner 3.NJG1 Whitley   23:25 3km SE Groenlo
Thursday, September 19, 1940 Paul Gildner 3.NJG1 Whitley   00:28 Zieuwent
Saturday, March 01, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Blenheim   02:58 Blenheim MkIV RAF 105Sqn GB-X T1895 was on a mission to Wilhelmshaven. It took-off from Swanton Morley Feb 28th 1941 at 2325 and was later shot down by Paul Gildner around 0258 and crashed Oosterhogebrug (Groningen, 5km East of Groningen Holland. Crew Sgt J S H Heape POW, Sgt S Jones and Sgt J Bimson both KIA DO-2 Groningen
Thursday, March 13, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Wellington   23:10 Wellington RAF Sqn BU-M N2746 was on a mission to Hamburg. It took-off from Stradishall Mar 13th 1941 at 2000 and was later shot down by Paul Gildner around 2248 and crashed (Burlanger) Groningen Holland. 5 KIA 1 POW. Killed were Sgt A G Elder, Sgt V L Bagley, Sgt S Glazer RNZAF, Sgt J B Tomkinson, Sgt G C Daniel all are buried in the General Cemetery at Esserveld Groningen except for Sgt D W Waters POW.
Thursday, March 13, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Blenheim   22:48 Blenheim MkIV RAF 110Sqn VE- R2278 was on a mission to Hamburg. It took-off from Wattisham Mar 13th 1941 at 2027 and was later shot down by Paul Gildner around 2248 and crashed Tolbert (Groningen, 14km SW of Groningen Holland. All crew are buried in the General Cemetery at Esserveld Groningen. F/L J Dickinson DFC, Sgt C W Fry, Sgt R Mower all KIA. DN-2 Tolbert W Groningen
Friday, April 04, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Whitley   00:27  
Tuesday, April 08, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Whitley   00:27 Whitley V RAF 58Sqn GE-P T4145 was on a mission to Keil. It took-off from Linton-on-Ouse Apr 7th 1941 at 2055 and was later shot down by Paul Gildner around 0027 Apr 8th 1941 and crashed Waterhuizen Groningen, 7 km SW of Groningen or 8km SE Groningen, Holland. 4 KIA 1 POW. Killed were P/O R McC Carrapiett, Sgt A J White, P/O C F Jones, Sgt A R Mason POW, Sgt A C Wroath all are buried in the General Cemetery at Esserveld Groningen except for Sgt A R Mason POW.
Thursday, April 10, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Wellington   01:07  
Friday, May 09, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Whitley   02:47  
Thursday, June 19, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Whitley   02:57  
Thursday, June 19, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Wellington   01:58  
Thursday, June 19, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Wellington   02:34  
Monday, June 30, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Whitley   02:43  
Wednesday, July 09, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Hampden   00:56  
Thursday, July 17, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Wellington 4400m 03:27 54/78/3
Friday, August 15, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Whitley V 2500m 04:43 vicinity Terschelling 225˚
Monday, October 13, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Whitley   04:05  
Friday, October 31, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Whitley   23:50 N Texel Island
Friday, October 31, 1941 Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 Wellington   21:30 Schiermonnikoog Vickers Wellington Mk.IA RAF 115 Squadron KO-P X9873 flown by W/O W B Snowden force landed Schiermonnikoog Holland 31st Oct - 1st Nov 1941. The aircraft took off from Marham 1750 for a raid on Bremen. Shot down by Ofw Paul Gildner 4./NJG1 with his radio operator Rudi Muller based at Leeuwarden with Bf 110C coded G9+HM. Schiermonnikoog is one of the West Frisian Islands, and is part of the province of Friesland. W/O W B Snowden was a very senior NCO. The crew all became POW's W/O W B Snowden, Sgt H E Woolley RCAF, Sgt A E Robinson, Sgt P V Brazier RCAF, Sgt A W Clarke RCAF, F/S P J C Darvill
Sunday, November 30, 1941 Paul Gildner Stab II./NJG2 Wellington      
Saturday, December 27, 1941 Paul Gildner Stab II./NJG2        
Tuesday, January 20, 1942 Paul Gildner Stab II./NJG2 Hampden   20:58 Noorddijk/Groningen (49Sqn)
Tuesday, March 03, 1942 Paul Gildner 5./NJG2 Wellington   21:20 20km NW Terschelling
Monday, March 09, 1942 Paul Gildner Stab II./NJG2 Manchester   03:49 Oranje 12km SSW Assen (83Sqn)
Friday, March 13, 1942 Paul Gildner 5./NJG2 Wellington   02:05 NW Vlieland
Thursday, March 26, 1942 Paul Gildner Stab II./NJG2 Blenheim   23:57 Waddenzee N Wieringen (114Sqn)
Thursday, April 09, 1942 Paul Gildner 5./NJG2 Wellington   02:07 20km NW Vlieland
Thursday, April 23, 1942 Paul Gildner Stab II./NJG2 Hampden   00:07 NW Ameland (408Sqn)
Wednesday, June 03, 1942 Paul Gildner 5./NJG2 Stirling   03:10 70km W. Petten
Tuesday, June 09, 1942 Paul Gildner 5./NJG2 Halifax   02:18 -
Thursday, July 09, 1942 Paul Gildner 5./NJG2 Lancaster   02:44 30km NW Amelund
Wednesday, July 29, 1942 Paul Gildner 5./NJG2 Stirling   01:27 20km NW Terschelling
Wednesday, August 12, 1942 Paul Gildner 5./NJG2 Halifax 4500m 01:55 Erbach b Wiesbaden
Friday, September 04, 1942 Paul Gildner 5./NJG2 Wellington 1500m 02:20 SW Norden Westermarsch
Tuesday, October 13, 1942 Paul Gildner 11./NJG1 Halifax 2200m 23:19 643 7G5
Sunday, February 14, 1943 Paul Gildner 1./NJG1 Wellington 3000m 21:47 32/3/3G9 in See
Sunday, February 14, 1943 Paul Gildner 1./NJG1 B-17 Fortress   22:07 22/6/3E in See
Friday, February 19, 1943 Paul Gildner Stab IV./NJG1 Halifax 1100m 21:05 44/6/3I2
Friday, February 19, 1943 Paul Gildner Stab IV./NJG1 Halifax 1000m 21:16 44/6/6E7

NJG 1 was the oldest night fighter unit in the Luftwaffe, and was founded by the legendary Oberst Wolfgang Falck. At the beginning of 1942, the unit's II.Gruppe was led by Major Walter Ehle, within which he served over three years. In 1942, the well known night fighter Wilhelm Herget, as an example, also served within the ranks of 4. Staffel II./NJG 1. This "G9+JM" is interesting not only for the sharkmouth marking, but also for the temporary application of a "naval" RLM 72 green on the upper surfaces, consistent with the fact that this plane took part in patrol flights for Operation Donnerkeil. A quick identification mark came in the form of a yellow fuselage band. During the operation, the Germans managed to navigate the battle cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, and the cruiser Prinz Eugen, through the English Channel from Brest (Bretagne, France) to northern Germany. The Luftwaffe, between the 11th and 13th of February, 1942, ensured uninterrupted patrols over the formation. II./NJG 1 and II./NJG 3 were tasked with cover duty in twilight and overnight hours. On the second day of operations, elements of both night fighter units relocated to Lister airbase in Norway, from which the last segment of the fleet's cruise was covered. The unit's detachment lasted in Norway through to the end of February. All air to air victories during Operation Donnerkeil were achieved by day fighters of the Luftwaffe.

NJG 1 byla nejstarší noèní stíhací jednotkou Luftwaffe a jejím zakladatelem byl legendární Oberst Wolfgang Falck. Na poèátku roku 1942 její II. Gruppe vedl Major Walter Ehle a v jejím èele setrval po dobu více než tøí let. V roce 1942 v rámci 4. Staffel II./NJG 1 sloužil napøíklad známý noèní stíhaè Wilhelm Herget. Stroj "G9+JM" je zajímavý jak žraloèí pøídí, tak i doèasným nátìrem "námoøní" zelenou barvou RLM 72 na horních plochách, což souviselo s tím, že se jeho osádka podílela na hlídkových letech bìhem operace Donnerkeil. Prvkem rychlé identifikace bìhem této akce je žlutý pruh na trupu. Bìhem ní se Nìmcùm podaøilo proplout s bitevními køižníky Scharnhorst a Gneisenau a s køižníkem Prinz Eugen Kanálem La Manche z francouzského Brestu na sever Nìmecka. Luftwaffe od 11. do 13. února 1942 zajistila nepøetržité hlídkování nad svazem. II./NJG 1 a II./NJG 3 byly povìøeny krytím bìhem soumraku a noèních hodin. Druhý den operace se èásti obou noèních stíhacích jednotek pøesunuly na norskou základnu Lister, odkud kryly závìreènou èást plavby svazu. V Norsku tento detašmán setrval až do konce února. Všech vzdušných vítìzství bìhem operace Donnerkeil dosáhly denní stíhací útvary Luftwaffe.

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Knights-Cross

Helmut Niklas

'We made a wide curve and again positioned ourselves behind our victim.'

Leutnant Helmut Niklas claimed his first two victories during Bomber Command's thousand bomber raid against Cologne on the night of 30/31 May 1942. The following report was submitted by his Bordfunker, Uffz. Wenning.

From the ground we had already seen seven bombers shot down - would there be anything left for us? The waiting was agony but at last we got the order to scramble. Once we had reached our Raum we didn't have long to wait. We saw the first one at 1,000 metres, and at a distance of 500 metres we recognised it as a Wellington. The enemy saw us almost simultaneously. He suddenly made a tight turn and we gained so much overtaking speed that we were unable to bring our guns to bear and passed the Wellington at close range. It fired at us, but much too tentatively; the threads of tracer didn't touch us. Leutnant Niklas pulled our aircraft round in a tight curve and we were back behind out target once more. From very close range we fired a burst into the bomber's port wing. It caught fire and we could see a faint glow.

We made a wide curve and again positioned ourselves behind our victim. We fired another burst into the fuselage and wing, which now began to burn brightly. The Wellington flew on for a short time with bigger and bigger flames shooting out of it. It then tipped over and went down like a comet, trailing a banner of fire behind it. There was an explosion just above the ground which lit up the surroundings. We were beside ourselves with joy. I slapped my pilot on the shoulders with both hands - our first kill!

We checked our position with a bearing from base, and then we were ready for the next. He was soon there. I was still bemused by the efforts of changing the ammunition drums at 4,000 metres without an oxygen mask when I saw a Tommy just ahead of us, another Wellington, about 700 metres away. He seemed to be flying rather uncertainly, but he wasn't firing. Had he seen us? We went straight into the attack. The target grew larger, then it was suddenly vast. I held my breath and from point blank range our guns fired into him, sawing into the fuselage and wing. I immediately saw flames coming from the stern. I was just going to shout out 'He's on fire!' when Lt. Niklas yelled, 'I'm wounded, I'll have to break off!' What I had thought were flames was return fire from the bomber's rear turret.

The engines droned on smoothly so the hits on our aircraft couldn't have been too serious. More serious, however, were my pilot's wounds.

His left arm was hanging down, lifeless. Lt. Niklas could feel the blood pouring down and asked me to bind his arm. In the meantime ground control had told us to fly a heading of 060 degrees. But how? The instrument panel had been hit and the compass was shot to pieces. It. Niklas saw that there was a two-figure degree-scale, which would give us approximate bearings.' Tell the airfield control that we must have the lights on at once!' But the lights couldn't be switched on as there were bombers above the airfield. Lt. Niklas had sunk forward again but repeatedly managed to pull himself together until, finally, he said, 'I think we'd better bale out - I can't go on!' He realised almost immediately, however, that to bale out in his condition would be madness. Then, to our left, the airfield lights came on.

'I can't see anything - it's all white in front of my eyes.' 'A bit to the left, Herr Leutnant - not too much!' Now we were flying straight for the airfield. We were almost above the lights before Leutnant Niklas saw them. There was not enough room to make a slow approach. He tried to get to the field by means of a sideslip. There were trees close beneath us.

'We're too low!'
'It's OK, we've got enough speed!'
'Don't forget the ignition and the intercom!'
I couldn't think what that had to do with it. A pond of some sort flashed past our wing-tip. The air speed indicator was still showing 300 kph.
'I can't go on!'

Leutnant Niklas fell forward again. Then there was a cracking noise, but quite soft. Soil was flung up against the cabin. We swept on just above the ground - it seemed endless. I sat there fascinated - was this what a belly landing was like? The cracking and banging got louder, then there was a jerk. I was flung to one side - all was then quiet. 'Get out!' It was Leutnant Niklas - his head had been flung forward and had regained consciousness. He sprang out of his seat, trying to loosen his parachute as he ran. Then he couldn't do any more. I let him slide down on to the ground, where I opened his blood soaked clothing. The doctor then arrived and took him away. Only then, when I was surrounded by other men and they began asking me questions, did I realise how lucky we had been.

Asisbiz Database of 6 aerial victories for Helmut Niklas

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
Sunday, May 31, 1942 Helmut Niklas 6./NJG1 Wellington   03:11  
Sunday, May 31, 1942 Helmut Niklas 6./NJG1 Wellington   02:46  
Monday, July 26, 1943 Helmut Niklas Stab I./NJG3 B-17 Fortress 7500m 12:55 1km E FlPl Diepholz
Wednesday, September 22, 1943 Helmut Niklas 6./NJG3 4-mot. Flzg. 5500m 22:47 Hannover
Wednesday, September 22, 1943 Helmut Niklas 6./NJG3 4-mot. Flzg. 5600m 22:44 Hannover
Friday, October 08, 1943 Helmut Niklas 6./NJG3 B-24 Liberator 2100m 16:35 SSW Helgoland

Luftwaffe Badge

Gustav Sarzio

Units: 6/NJG-1

Awards: EP, EK 1 & 2, Wound Badge, Night Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 110

Remarks: WIA 4/5 November, 1944 at Viersen/Rheinland during aerial combat with a Mosquito of RAF No. 85 Sq., piloted by S/Ldr B. Burbridge (Boiten). One known victory, a '4 mot' at Feindbögen (Feindhoren?) on 13 June, 1944. A '4 mot' at Deelen on 17 June, 1944. Two '4 mots' on 21 July, 1944; one near Beacon 'St Trond', the 2nd W of Beacon 'Deelen'. Another '4 mot' on 13 August, 1944, no location given.

Asisbiz database list of 6 aerial victories for Gustav Sarzio

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
Tuesday, June 13, 1944 Gustav Sarzio 6./NJG1 Lancaster   01:03 Fiendbogen (20km NW Venlo)
Saturday, June 17, 1944 Gustav Sarzio 6./NJG1 Lancaster 4200m 02:05 FuF. Deelen (5km E. Utrecht)
Friday, July 21, 1944 Gustav Sarzio 6./NJG1 Halifax 5800m 01:14 Stl. FuF St. Trond (12km W. Roermond)
Friday, July 21, 1944 Gustav Sarzio 6./NJG1 Lancaster 3200m 02:16 W. FuF. Deelen (20km W. Katwijk-aan-Zee)
Sunday, August 13, 1944 Gustav Sarzio 6./NJG1 Halifax 7000m 00:21 RQ-SQ (33km N. Kaiserslautern)

Knights-Cross

Wolfgang Thimmig

Asisbiz Database of 23 aerial victories for Wolfgang Thimmig

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
Wednesday, June 18, 1941 Wolfgang Thimmig 2./NJG1 Whitley   02:41  
Friday, July 11, 1941 Wolfgang Thimmig 2./NJG1 Wellington   02:40  
Wednesday, July 16, 1941 Wolfgang Thimmig 2./NJG1 Wellington   01:31  
Friday, July 18, 1941 Wolfgang Thimmig 2.NJG1 Whitley   02:41 -
Sunday, August 17, 1941 Wolfgang Thimmig 2./NJG1 Hampden 4800m 01:41 20km NE Bocholt
Sunday, August 31, 1941 Wolfgang Thimmig 2./NJG1 Hampden   23:39  
Sunday, May 31, 1942 Wolfgang Thimmig 2./NJG1 Halifax   02:06  
Sunday, May 31, 1942 Wolfgang Thimmig 2./NJG1 Halifax   02:06  
Thursday, August 27, 1942 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab III.NJG1 Wellington 4200m 23:25 7371 S4 Epe
Thursday, August 27, 1942 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab III.NJG1 Halifax 3500m 23:54 4km S. Haaksbergen
Wednesday, February 03, 1943 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab III./NJG1 Stirling 4200m 20:10 6367 D3 E Hengelo
Saturday, May 01, 1943 Wolfgang Thimmig III./NJG1 Halifax 6200m 02:43 632 3F8
Saturday, May 01, 1943 Wolfgang Thimmig III./NJG1 Lancaster 6200m 03:20 635 2C6
Wednesday, May 05, 1943 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab III./NJG1 Halifax 6000m 00:50 7358 A2
Wednesday, May 05, 1943 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab III./NJG1 Halifax 5700m 00:34 Epe 3km S Gronau
Monday, May 24, 1943 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab III./NJG1 Wellington 4800m 01:25 6385
Monday, May 24, 1943 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab III./NJG1 Halifax 5400m 01:34 6364 (Zuna/Overijssel)
Monday, May 24, 1943 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab III./NJG1 Wellington 5000m 01:08 8km SE Enschede (Rutbeek)
Saturday, October 02, 1943 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab III./NJG101 Lancaster 6200m 23:05 Kircheim/Teck
Friday, April 21, 1944 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab /NJG4 4-mot. Flzg. 3600m 00:38 Morsang 25km S Paris
Saturday, July 08, 1944 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab /NJG4 B-26 Marauder 2500m 02:47 05 Ost S/RE (Amiens)
Saturday, July 08, 1944 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab /NJG4 B-26 Marauder 3700m 02:55 05 Ost S/RD (Senarpont)
Saturday, July 08, 1944 Wolfgang Thimmig Stab /NJG4 B-26 Marauder 1500m 02:59 UT u TU-2 (Seine Bay)

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