Junkers Ju 88G6 Geschwader Stab NJG5 (C9+AA) Rudolf Schoenert WNr 620788 01

Photo 01: The rear fuselage of a Junkers Ju 88G-6, WNr. 620788, with an unusual SN-2 aerial configuration. The aerials were mounted in this fashion in an experiment to determine whether the SN-2 would be less sensitive to 'Window' jamming, more effective in detecting high-flying bombers, and more efficient in detecting Mosquitoes approaching from behind and below. This particular aircraft, coded C9+AA, was assigned to Eichenlaubtrager Major Rudolf Schonert, the Kommodore of NJG5 at Lubeck-Blankensee, who is thought to have flown the machine with this installation only once. On that occasion, during a sortie east of the Elbe on 27 April 1945, an electrical fault rendered the radar unserviceable and the Ju 88 was shot down by a Mosquito. Schonert survived and was rescued by German troops. He died in Canada in 1985.

Pilots NJG5 Rudolf Schoenert 01

Photo 01: At the end of July 1943, IV/NJG5 was redesignated I./NJG100 and Hptm. Wittgenstein was transferred back to the West. He was succeeded by Hptm. Rudolf Schoenert, shown here, who finished the war as a holder of the Oak Leaves to the Knight's Cross and with a total of 64 victories.

Pilots NJG5 Rudolf Schoenert 02

Photo 02: After five years in the Merchant Navy, Rudolf Schoenert began flight training in 1933 and went on to fly commercial aircraft for Lufthansa, He was commissioned as a Leutnant in the Luftwaffe's Reserve in 1938 and, in June 1941, he joined 4,/NJG1 stationed at Bergen in northern Holland. He gained his first victories as a night fighter on 9 July 1941 and by 25 July 1942, at which time his total stood at 22, he was awarded the Knight's Cross, He is universally recognised as the driving force behind the introduction of upward-firing armaments in night fighter aircraft, the first prototype of which he introduced into his own Do-17 in 1942.This weapons system, which remained a complete mystery to all but a select few within Bomber Command, was codenamed 'Schrage Musik'.

Armourer NJG5 Paul Mahle 01

Photo 01: Oberfeldwebel Paul Mahle, an armourer attached to II./NJG5 at Parchim, worked closely with Rudolf Schoenert and built his own working prototype of 'Schrage Musik', which was soon fitted to all of the Gruppe's aircraft.

Stab II Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 5 - 1./NJG5

Junkers Ju 88G Stab II./NJG5 (C9+AC) Hans Leickhardt 1944 00

Profile 00: Junkers Ju 88G-6 flown by Major Hans Leickhardt, Kommandeur of II./NJG5, Stubendorf, late 1944. The camouflage on this machine provides a good example of how the overall grey 75 on the uppersurfaces, which was found unsuitable for night operations, was lightened with an overs pray of 76 but in such a manner that irregular patches of the original 75 remained as a result of the method of overspraying. As the accompanying photograph shows what is thought to be part of a Kommandeur's double chevron just ahead of the letters 'AC' on the fuselage, this profile has been completed accordingly.

Junkers Ju 88G Stab II./NJG5 (C9+AC) Leickhardt 1944 A0

Painting A0: Junkers Ju 88G-6 flown by Major Hans Leickhardt, Kommandeur of II./NJG5, Stubendorf, late 1944. The camouflage on this machine provides a good example of how the overall grey 75 on the uppersurfaces, which was found unsuitable for night operations, was lightened with an overs pray of 76 but in such a manner that irregular patches of the original 75 remained as a result of the method of overspraying.

Junkers Ju 88G Stab II./NJG5 (C9+AC) Hans Leickhardt 1944 01

Photo 01: This Junkers Ju 88G-6 was one of the few aircraft equipped with FuG-220 SN-2 radar with a 'Morgenstern' aerial. In this instance, the aerial has been left uncovered, but it was sometimes faired over within a long, tapered housing. It is thought that this particular machine was photographed in late 1944, at which time the operational code C9+AC on the fuselage side would indicate that it was flown by Major Hans Leickhardt who, from 3 May 1944 to 6 March 1945 was the Kommandeur of II./NJG5. Note the light area around the 'C' in the fuselage code and what is believed to be the corner of a Kommandeur's double chevron just visible behind the trailing edge of the starboard wing. Hans Leickhardtshot down 30 enemy aircraft all at night.

1 Staffel I Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 5 - 1./NJG5

Junkers Ju 88G 1./NJG5 (C9+OH) WNr 714084 St Dizier France 1944 01

Photo 01: This Junkers Ju 88G-1, WNr. 714084, was photographed at St. Dizier in France in September 1944 and had belonged to I./NJG5. Note the differences in the finish between the fuselage and tailplane and that the 76 on the wings has been applied over the 75 in broad swathes. The operational code on this machine was (C9+OH).

7 Staffel III Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 5 - 7./NJG5

Junkers Ju 88G 7./NJG5 (C9+AR) WNr 623211 Dübendorf Apr 30 1945 01

Profile 00:

Junkers Ju 88G 7./NJG5 (C9+AR) WNr 623211 Dübendorf Apr 30 1945 01

Photo 01: An unusual feature of this Junkers Ju 88G-6 of 7./NJG5 which landed at Dübendorf on 30 April 1945 was the particularly dark uppersurface camouflage and the light color of the swastika and unit code. It is believed that the original factory finish was 75 on the uppersurfaces and 76 on the undersurfaces, although the uppersurfaces were later modified with what was described in a Swiss report on the aircraft as moss green with dense olive mottles, almost certainly 82 and 81 respectively. Note that all markings are either in white or possibly RLM 77.

IV Gruppe Nachtjagdgeschwader 5 - IV./NJG5

Junkers Ju 88 C-6 IV./NJG5 (C9+AE) Sayn-Wittgenstein 01

Photo 01: This tail unit with 29 victory bars is reported to have belonged to the Ju 88 C-6 flown by Hptm. Heinrich Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein, the Kommandeur of IV/NJG5, probably when based at Insterburg in East Prussia in Mayor June 1943.There are many inconstancies between the victory bars shown and Sayn-Wittgenstein's known confirmed victories. For example, although the bars in the bottom row including the linked bars which represent multiple kills correspond precisely with Sayn Wittgenstein's kills in July 1942, the rest cannot be reconciled with his subsequent claims. Moreover, on the night of 24/25 June 1943, he claimed four kills which raised his total from 28 to 32, but why only one of those victories should be shown, bringing the total to 29 bars, is again not known.The grey camouflage on this aircraft, a Ju 88 C-6 code C9+AE, would appear to consist of 74 mottles over 75.

Luftwaffe aircrew NJG5 Heinrich Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 01

Photo 01: In order to bolster the makeshift night fighter units operating in Russia, IV/NJG5, under the command of Hauptmann Heinrich Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein, was deployed to Insterburg in East Prussia on several occasions during 1943. Wittgenstein accumulated 33 victories against the Soviets.

Junkers Ju 88 C-6 IV./NJG5 (C9+DE) Heinrich Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Kursk 1943 00

Profile 00: Pilot - CO of IV./NJG5 Hauptmann Heinrich Alexander zu Sayn-Wittgenstein. Kursk area, Summer 1943. Heinrich Alexander zu Sayn-Wittgenstein was promoted to Major and is credited with 83 victories but KIA on 22 Jan 1944 in Luftkampf. 320ff (150 as Kampfflieger). He servered with the following units KG 51, NJG2, NJG5, NJG1, NJG3.

Pilots 4./NJG5 Heinrich Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 01

Photo 01: In order to bolster the makeshift night fighter units operating in Russia, IV/NJG5, under the command of Hauptmann Heinrich Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein, was deployed to Insterburg in East Prussia on several occasions during 1943. Wittgenstein accumulated 33 victories against the Soviets.

Junkers Ju 88 C-6 IV./NJG5 (C9+AE) Kommandeur Heinrich Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 01

Photo 01: This tail unit with 29 victory bars is reported to have belonged to the Ju 88 C-6 flown by Hptm. Heinrich Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein, the Kommandeur of IV/NJG5, probably when based at Insterburg in East Prussia in Mayor June 1943. There are many inconstancies between the victory bars shown and Sayn-Wittgenstein's known confirmed victories. For example, although the bars in the bottom row including the linked bars which represent multiple kills correspond precisely with Sayn Wittgenstein's kills in July 1942, the rest cannot be reconciled with his subsequent claims. Moreover, on the night of 24/25 June 1943, he claimed four kills which raised his total from 28 to 32, but why only one of those victories should be shown, bringing the total to 29 bars, is again not known. The grey camouflage on this aircraft, a Ju 88 C-6 code C9+AE, would appear to consist of 74 mottles over 75.

New IL-2 Sturmovik Cliffs of Dover - COD skins

 Matthew Laird Acred editor and graphic artist for Asisbiz; Cliffs of Dover game skin and article information was updated on Mar 4, 2014.

BL Ju 88C 4./NJG5 (C9+DE) Sayn-Wittgenstein Kursk 1943 A
BL Ju 88C 4./NJG5 (C9+DE) Sayn-Wittgenstein Kursk 1943 B
BL Ju 88C 4./NJG5 (C9+DE) Sayn-Wittgenstein Kursk 1943 V0A

Ju.88C-6 of Stab.IV./NJG5 C9+DE Pilot - CO of IV./NJG5 Hauptmann Heinrich Alexander zu Sayn-Wittgenstein. Kursk area, Summer 1943. Template by Opa, Theres two versions of this aircraft Weathered & unweathered so in each version there's marked, unmarked , marked without swastika , six skins in total in the download, Bright finished ......Buglord. This aircraft was equipped with Ju.88C-4 cockpit, additional armour and additional MG151 29 mm cannon in nose section. Wittgenstein used this aircraft in clear moonlit nights and got more of it's victories in July 1943. BL Buglord

MH Ju 88C 4./NJG5 (C9+DE) Sayn-Wittgenstein Kursk 1943
MH Ju 88C 4./NJG5 (C9+DE) Sayn-Wittgenstein Kursk 1943 V0A

MH Max_theHitman http://downloads.flightsimfiles.com/


Knights Cross

Hans Robert Leickhardt

Units: 2/NJG-3(4/41), 11/NJG-1(6/43), 2/NJG-5(10/43), Kdr II/NJG-5(5/44), Kdr V/NJG-5(5/44 to end)

Awards: DK-G, EP, EK 1 & 2, Night Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Ju 88G-6 WNr 621832 'C9+AC' in NJG-5, Bf 110G-4 WNr 160669 (lost 3/45)

Remarks: KIA 5/6 March, 1945 (Magnus). One known victory, perhaps his 1st, a Whitley at Papenburg the night of 7-8 April, 1941. A 2nd, a Lancaster at Kampen on 26 June, 1943. A 3rd, a '4 mot' 40 km N of Kassel on 22 October, 1943. His 9th, a B-17 on 4 January, 1944. His 10th, a B-17 at Quackenbrück-Meppen on 11 January, 1944. A '4 mot' NE of Gifhorn on 20 February, 1944. A Halifax NE of Frankfurt/Main on 31 March, 1944. Magnus, 30 victories; Boiten 12 victories. Alternate spelling: Leichardt.

Asisbiz list of aerial victories for Luftwaffe wings Hans Robert Leickhardt

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
08-Apr-41 Hans Leickhardt 2.NJG3 Whitley Papenburg 7600m 00.29
08-Apr-41 Hans Leickhardt 2./NJG3 Whitley Papenburg   00.29
26-Jun-43 Hans Leickhardt 11./NJG1 Lancaster FM 73 (Kampen) 4000m 01.06
22-Oct-43 Hans Leickhardt 2./NJG5 4-mot. Flzg. 30-40km N Kassel 6000m 21.18
03-Jan-44 Hans Leickhardt 2.NJG5 Lancaster     02.40
04-Jan-44 Hans Leickhardt 2./NJG5 B-17 Fortress      
11-Jan-44 Hans Leickhardt 2./NJG5 B-17 Fortress Quakenbruck-Meppen (assessed)   12.40E
21-Jan-44 Hans Leickhardt 2.NJG5 Halifax   3000m 22.13
29-Jan-44 Hans Leickhardt 2.NJG5 Lancaster     03.44
30-Jan-44 Hans Leickhardt 2.NJG5 Lancaster     20.23
20-Feb-44 Hans Leickhardt 2./NJG5 4-mot. Flgz. FB (NE Gifhorn) 5800m 02.57
31-Mar-44 Hans Leickhardt 2./NJG5 Halifax NE Frankfurt/Main 4600m 00.53
13-Feb-45 Hans Leickhardt Stab II./NJG5 Lancaster      
13-Feb-45 Hans Leickhardt Stab II./NJG5 Lancaster      
06-Mar-45 Hans Leickhardt Stab II./NJG5 4-mot. Flzg.      

Knights Cross

Rudolf Schoenert

Units: Stafkpt 4/NJG-2 ('42), Stafkpt 5/NJG-3, Kdr II/NJG-5 ('42), Kdr NJG-100(8/43 S.U.), Kdr NJG-5 (3/45 to end)

Awards: RK(7/25/42)-EL(4/11/44), DK-G(5/25/42), EP(1/5/42), EK 1 & 2, Night Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 110, Do 17 in NJG-2('42), Do 217 in 3/NJG-3, Ju 88G-6 'C9+AA' & Ju 88G-6 WNr 620788 'C9+AC' in NJG-5, Do 217 in II/NJG-5

Remarks: All victories were Night victories, 35 in Russia. 376 combat missions. He also served as Kdr I/NJG-100 in Russia; Kdr Erpro (Test Unit)/NJGr-10 (1/44) flying the Bf 109G, Fw 190A, Bf 110, Ju 88, He 219 & the Ta 154; and Kdr NJG-5 until wars end. His first western victory, two Whitley's the night of 8-9 July, 1941, no locations. A Wellington 5 km W of Lemmer the night of 16-17 July, 1941. His first known Soviet victory, a TB-7 and two R-5's on the night of 16-17 August, 1943. A TB-7 the night of 27-28 August, 1943. Four Soviet B-25's on the night of 31 August, 1943. Two DB-3's and two PS-84's the night of 7-8 September, 1943. Two DB-3's near Smolensk on the night of 20-21 September, 1943. Three PS-84's in the Charkovo-Alexeyevo areas onthe night of 11-12 October, 1943. Four DB-3's near Demenino (near Kursk) the night of 14-15 October, 1943. One of his many western victories, a Halifax NW of Berlin on 15 February, 1944. Five victories, 61 to 65, all 'E/a's on the Eastern Front' on 24 April, 1945. Bowers /Lednicer, 64 victories. Alternate spelling: Schönert. Deceased 30 November, 1985 in Canada. Photo

Asisbiz database list of 66 aerial victories for Luftwaffe wings Rudolf Schoenert

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
Wednesday, July 09, 1941 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG1 Whitley   03:40  
Wednesday, July 09, 1941 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG1 Whitley   02:51  
Thursday, July 17, 1941 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG1 Wellington 4000m 00:50 53/27/2 5km W Lemmer
Monday, August 04, 1941 Rudolf Schoenert 4.NJG1 Wellington 4700m 00:14 53/19/2/7 Zuidersee (SW Staveren)
Tuesday, September 02, 1941 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG1 Unident: 4400m 23:34 15km N Wangerooge
Friday, October 31, 1941 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG1 Halifax   22:05  
Friday, October 31, 1941 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG1 Halifax   21:37  
Sunday, November 02, 1941 Rudolf Schoenert Stab II./NJG2 Hampden      
Thursday, November 06, 1941 Rudolf Schoenert Stab II./NJG2 Hampden      
Sunday, November 30, 1941 Rudolf Schoenert Stab II./NJG2 Whitley      
Sunday, November 30, 1941 Rudolf Schoenert 5./NJG2 Whitley 3600m 20:52 Georgensheid
Saturday, January 10, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 5./NJG2 Wellington 5000m 23:15 74154 See * Shared with 11./NJG1.
Wednesday, January 14, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 5./NJG2 Manchester 3900m 20:50 74493 b Rispel
Monday, January 26, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 5./NJG2 Whitley 3200m 20:50 64132 See
Friday, March 27, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG2 Halifax   23:21  
Sunday, April 26, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG2 Wellington   00:24  
Monday, May 18, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG2 Stirling   00:54  
Sunday, June 07, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG2 Wellington 4900m 02:27 74/1/1
Sunday, June 07, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG2 Wellington   02:27  
Saturday, June 20, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG2 Wellington   01:49  
Tuesday, June 23, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG2 Wellington 2800m 01:17 74522 1½km NW Georgheil
Tuesday, June 23, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG2 Stirling   02:07  
Monday, July 20, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG2 Halifax   02:51  
Monday, July 27, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG2 Halifax   02:32  
Wednesday, July 29, 1942 Rudolf Schoenert 4./NJG2 Wellington   03:28  
Tuesday, March 30, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab II./NJG5 Lancaster 6000m 01:30 1km NWFlH Resch in See
Wednesday, April 21, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab II./NJG5 Lancaster 4700-2300m 02:23 Hafen Gjetser
Monday, August 16, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 TB-7 2400m 22:08 44 417
Monday, August 16, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 R-5 1500m 23:36 44 635
Monday, August 16, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 R-5 1900m 23:56 44 666
Friday, August 27, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 TB-7 5300m 20:20 34 131
Tuesday, August 31, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 B-25 Mitchell 3000m 22:21 25 69
Tuesday, August 31, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 B-25 Mitchell 2600m 22:37 35 75
Tuesday, August 31, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 B-25 Mitchell 2300m 23:00 35 87
Tuesday, August 31, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 B-25 Mitchell 2900m 22:01 25 69
Friday, September 03, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 R-5 2100m 22:34 Poltava
Monday, September 06, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 R-5 900m 21:03 NE Butien
Tuesday, September 07, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 2600m 21:48 Brunischlschi
Tuesday, September 07, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 PS-84 2000m 22:29 Mischaly
Tuesday, September 07, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 PS-84 2200m 22:17 Grischany
Tuesday, September 07, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 4000m 20:58 E Slobodka
Monday, September 20, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 3400m 23:27 Kislyaki (Krs Smolensk)
Monday, September 20, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 1200m 23:57 West of Mirgorod
Sunday, October 10, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 U-2 1000m 22:41 Ditbrovnovo
Monday, October 11, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 PS-84 2000m 21:37 N Alexeyevo
Monday, October 11, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 PS-84 2000m 21:00 SE Sapolye
Monday, October 11, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 PS-84 2000m 20:54 N Charkovo
Tuesday, October 12, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 U-2 2000m 22:43 05 363/35 Ost
Wednesday, October 13, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 2000m 01:07 Babinovitski
Wednesday, October 13, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 6000m 17:46 Berseja
Wednesday, October 13, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 4500m 21:24 15 1869/35 Ost
Thursday, October 14, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 1900m 20:56 Naravoki
Thursday, October 14, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 1300m 18:21 West of Demenino (Krs Kursk)
Thursday, October 14, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 1700m 18:26 West of Demenino (Krs Kursk)
Thursday, October 14, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 1300m 18:37 West of Demenino (Krs Kursk)
Friday, October 15, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 PS-84 2300m 20:17 Haschuki
Wednesday, October 27, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 R-5 1800m 22:37 05 424/35 Ost
Wednesday, October 27, 1943 Rudolf Schoenert Stab I./NJG100 DB-3 2000m 19:37 Warafina
Thursday, January 06, 1944 Rudolf Schoenert StabNJGr.10 4-mot. Flgz.   - -
Tuesday, February 15, 1944 Rudolf Schoenert Stab /NJGr.10 Halifax 6000m 21:08 NW Berlin
Sunday, February 20, 1944 Rudolf Schoenert Stab /NJGr.10 Halifax 6300m 04:33 6-10km SW Leipzig
Wednesday, April 25, 1945 Rudolf Schoenert StabNJG5 Il-4   - S. Berlin
Wednesday, April 25, 1945 Rudolf Schoenert StabNJG5 Il-4   - S. Berlin
Wednesday, April 25, 1945 Rudolf Schoenert StabNJG5 Il-4   - S. Berlin
Wednesday, April 25, 1945 Rudolf Schoenert StabNJG5 Il-4   - S. Berlin
Wednesday, April 25, 1945 Rudolf Schoenert StabNJG5 Abschuß   - -

Luftwaffe Badge

Heinrich Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein

Units: KG-51 (5/40), KG-1 (6/41), Kdr IV./NJG-5 (12/42), NJG-100, II./NJG-3, Kdr NJG-4, Kdr NJG-2

Awards: RK(10/2/42)-EL(8/31/43)-S(1/23/44), DK-G(9/7/42), EP(5/19/41), EK 1 & 2, NJ Oper.Clasp w/'300'

Known Aircraft: He 111(KG-51), Do 17Z(NJG-2), Ju 88C(NJG-3), Bf 110(NJG-5), Ju 88C-6 WNr750467 'R4+XM'(lost 1/44)

Remarks: KIA the night of 21-22 January, 1944 in Ju 88C-6, when he was Kdr NJG-2, by an English Night Fighter during a raid on Magdeburg, after downing five enemy AC himself. 150 missions against ground targets while in KG-1 & KG-51 in Russia. 29 night victories in Russia. Three DB-3's and a Boston the night of 19-20 July, 1943. His first known Soviet night victory, two DB-3's on 17 April, 1943. A DB-3 on 23 April, 1943. Another Soviet, a B-25 SE of Schweindl (sic) on the night of 23-24 April, 1943. A Soviet DB-3 the night of 11-12 July, 1943. Seven Soviet victories on the night of 20-21 July, 1943. His 1st known western victory came on 9 May, 1942, four months after joining NJG-2. His stay in the west was brief, and he returned to Russia in May 1943 downing a DB-3 SE of Eydklau on 1 May, 1943. He was Kdr JG-100 in August, 1943. Numerous multiple victory nights including 5 AC on 21 January, 1944. His R/O in IV/NJG-5 (6/43) was Herbert Kümmritz. In II/NJG-3 & NJG-2, it was Fw Friedrich Ostheimer (survived) and mech. Kurt Matzuleit. Heinrich's body was found in a woods near Stendal. Buried at the German War Cemetery at Ysselsteyn, Holland.

Heinrich Alexander Ludwig Peter Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein (14 August 1916 – 21 January 1944) was a German of aristocratic descent and a Luftwaffe night fighter flying ace during World War II. A flying ace or fighter ace is a military aviator credited with shooting down five or more enemy aircraft during aerial combat. At the time of his death, he was the highest scoring night fighter pilot in the Luftwaffe and still the third highest by the end of World War II, with 83 aerial victories to his credit.

Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein was born on 14 August 1916 in Copenhagen, Denmark and joined the cavalry of the German Wehrmacht in the spring of 1937. He was accepted for flight training and transferred to the emerging Luftwaffe. He initially served as an observer and later as pilot in Kampfgeschwader 1 (KG 1) and Kampfgeschwader 51 (KG 51). With these units he fought in the Battle of France, Battle of Britain and Operation Barbarossa, the German invasion of the Soviet Union, before he transferred to the night fighter force. He claimed his first aerial victory on the night of 6/7 May 1942. By October 1942, he had accumulated 22 aerial victories for which he was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes) on 7 October 1942. He received the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub) on 31 August 1943, for 54 aerial victories. He was tasked with the leadership of Nachtjagdgeschwader 2 (NJG 2) in January 1944, before he was killed in action on the night of 21 January 1944. Posthumously he was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern).

Military career

In April 1937, Sayn-Wittgenstein decided on a military career and joined the 17. Kavallerie-Regiment (17th Cavalry Regiment) in Bamberg. He transferred to the Luftwaffe in the summer of 1937 and, in October, he was accepted at the flight training school in Braunschweig. He received his officer's commission and was promoted to Leutnant (second lieutenant) in June 1938. Sayn-Wittgenstein served on various air bases from where he flew the Junkers Ju 88 and the Heinkel He 111. In the winter of 1938–39 he served as a Kampfbeobachter (combat observer or navigator) in Kampfgeschwader 54 (KG 54—54th Bomber Wing) based at Fritzlar.

With the bomber arm.

After the outbreak of World War II on 1 September 1939, Sayn-Wittgenstein experienced his first combat action on the Western Front in the Battle of France and, later, during the Battle of Britain. Initially he served as an observer on the He 111 H-3 from Kampfgeschwader 1 "Hindenburg," piloted by Gerhard Baeker, with whom he flew high-altitude missions against the Royal Air Force (RAF) airfield at Biggin Hill.

In the winter of 1940–41, Sayn-Wittgenstein returned to pilot school and took his Luftwaffe Advanced Pilot's Certificate 2 (Erweiterter Luftwaffen-Flugzeugführerschein 2), also known as 'C2'-Certificate, confirming proficiency for blind-flying, a pre-requisite for night duty, and returned to a combat unit in March 1941. In preparation for Operation Barbarossa, the German invasion of the Soviet Union, his unit moved to Eichwalde in East Prussia. In support of Heeresgruppe Nord (Army Group North), KG 1 flew its first missions against Liepāja and then Jelgava and Riga, targeting the heavily-occupied enemy airfields. In August 1941, Sayn-Wittgenstein transferred to the night fighter force. By this time, he had flown 150 combat missions and was awarded both classes of the Iron Cross (Eisernes Kreuz), Honour Goblet of the Luftwaffe (Ehrenpokal der Luftwaffe) and the Front Flying Clasp of the Luftwaffe for Bomber crews in Gold (Frontflugspange für Kampfflieger in Gold).

Night fighter

Sayn-Wittgenstein had left KG 51 by January 1942, after he had volunteered for the night fighter force and been appointed Staffelkapitän (squadron leader) of the 9./Nachtjagdgeschwader 2 (9./NJG 2—9th Squadron of the 2nd Night Fighter Wing) on 1 November 1941.[10] He claimed his first nocturnal victory—a Bristol Blenheim 40 kilometers (25 mi) west of Walcheren—on the night of 6 May 1942, while serving with the Ergänzungsgruppe (Supplementary Group) of NJG 2. He shot down three aircraft in both the nights of 31 July 1942 (victories 15–17) and 10 September 1942 (victories 19–21). Sayn-Wittgenstein received the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes) on 7 October 1942, after 22 aerial victories. The award was presented by General Josef Kammhuber, after which they both inspected the personnel of 9./NJG 2.

Hauptmann (captain) Sayn-Wittgenstein was moved to the Eastern Front in February 1943 after he had been appointed Gruppenkommandeur (group commander) of the IV./Nachtjagdgeschwader 5 (IV./NJG 5—4th Squadron of the 5th Night Fighter Wing) on 1 December 1942. Here Unteroffizier Herbert Kümmritz joined Sayn-Wittgenstein's crew as his radio and wireless operator (Bordfunker). Kümmritz at this time already had six months of operation experience on board a Messerschmitt Bf 110 serving with the II./Nachtjagdgeschwader 3 (II./NJG 3—2nd Squadron of the 3rd Night Fighter Wing) stationed at Stade. Kümmeritz had studied high frequency technology at the Telefunken Company in Berlin before World War II. Prior to Kümmeritz, Sayn-Wittgenstein had rejected all his previous radio operators after only a few missions. In March and April 1943, Kammhuber ordered IV./NJG 5 to relocate to Rennes, France in defense of the German U-boat bases.

Stationed at Gilze-Rijen the order was issued to convert to the Bf 110 night fighter. Sayn-Wittgenstein flew the Bf 110 for one short flight only, but on the night of 24 June 1943, the aircraft had technical problems and was considered unserviceable. Kümmeritz and Sayn-Wittgenstein took off in their usual Ju 88 C and shot down four Avro Lancaster bombers (victories 32–35). Sayn-Wittgenstein never flew another Bf 110 again, preferring his Ju 88 to the Bf 110. The group was relocated to the Eastern Front again and redesignated as I./Nachtjagdgeschwader 100 (I./NJG 100—1st Squadron of the 100th Night Fighter Wing) on 1 August 1943. While stationed at Insterburg, East Prussia, Sayn-Wittgenstein shot down seven aircraft in one mission, six of them within 47 minutes (victories 36–41), in the area north-east of Oryol on 20 July 1943.

Sayn-Wittgenstein claimed three more victories on 1 August 1943 (victories 44–46) and three more on the night of 3 August 1943 (victories 48–50). He was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of the II./NJG 3 on 15 August 1943. Sayn-Wittgenstein became the 290th recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub) after 54 aerial victories on 31 August 1943. The award was presented at the Führerhauptquartier in East Prussia on 22 September 1943. For these achievements he also received a letter from the commanding general of the 4. Jagd-Division (4th Fighter Division) Generalleutnant (lieutenant general) Joachim-Friedrich Huth.

On 1 December 1943, Sayn-Wittgenstein was ordered to take over command of the II./Nachtjagdgeschwader 2 (II./NJG 2—2nd Groupe of the 2nd Night Fighter Wing). He was appointed Geschwaderkommodore (wing commander) of NJG 2 on 1 January 1944; he had already reached 68 aerial victories. He claimed shooting down six four-engined bombers on the same night (victories 69–74). In late 1943, his wireless operator Kümmeritz went on study leave and was replaced by Feldwebel (warrant officer) Friedrich Ostheimer, who flew with Sayn-Wittgenstein from October 1943 until January 1944.

On the night of 20 January 1944 Sayn-Wittgenstein claimed three enemy aircraft shot down in the Berlin area (victories 76–78). He almost collided with the third burning Lancaster which went into a dive and came very close to his own Ju 88. The Ju 88 went out of control and Sayn-Wittgenstein regained control of his just-flyable aircraft. His radio operator on this mission, Feldwebel Friedrich Ostheimer established contact with airfield at Erfurt. Since the aircraft began stalling after the wheels and flaps went down the crew decided to belly-land the aircraft. They discovered that about 2 meters (6.6 ft) of the wing had been cut off by the Lancaster's propeller.

Death

The next day, 21 January 1944, Sayn-Wittgenstein, wireless operator Ostheimer and board mechanic Unteroffizier Kurt Matzuleit took off on a Zahme Sau (Tame Boar), a combination of ground controlled and airborne radar, night fighter intercept mission flying the Ju 88 R4+XM (Werknummer 750 467—factory number), which normally was assigned to the Technical Officer of NJG 2. At 22:00 contact with the first of five Lancasters was established and shot down which was observed to explode at 22:05. Between 22:10 and 22:15 the second Lancaster was shot down. Observers reported the third Lancaster exploded at approximately 22:30, followed shortly by number four, which hit the ground at 22:40. During the fifth and final attack, the four engined bomber was burning when their Ju 88 came under attack, presumably from British fighter escorts. In the attack, their left wing caught fire. Sayn-Wittgenstein ordered his crew to jump, and Ostheimer and Matzuleit parachuted to safety from the damaged aircraft.

Sayn-Wittgenstein's body was found near the wreckage of the Ju 88 in a forest area belonging to the municipality of Lübars by Stendal the next day. His parachute was discovered unopened and it was deduced that he may have hit his head on the vertical stabiliser of his aircraft when trying to escape. The death certificate listed "closed fracture of the skull and facial bone" as his cause of death. He was posthumously awarded the 44th Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern) on 23 January 1944. Heinrich Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein had flown 320 combat missions, 150 of which as a bomber pilot or observer. At the time of his death he was the leading night fighter pilot with 83 aerial victories, with 23 of them claimed on the Eastern and 60 on the Western Front.

On 25 January 1944, Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein's death was announced in the Wehrmachtbericht, an information bulletin issued by the headquarters of the Wehrmacht. He was buried on 29 January 1944 in the Geschwader cemetery at the Deelen Air Base. His remains were re-interred in 1948. He is now resting next to Prinz Egmont zur Lippe-Weißenfeld at Ysselsteyn in the Netherlands.

The question who shot down Sayn-Wittgenstein is unanswered. Friedrich Ostheimer remained convinced that they were shot down by a long range intruder de Havilland Mosquito night fighter. However, no Mosquito pilot claimed an aerial victory that night. A closer analysis reveals that three Mosquitos, two Serrate-equipped aircraft from No. 141 Squadron RAF and one from No. 239 Squadron RAF, participated in the attacks on Magdeburg. Only one Mosquito had enemy contact: No. 141's squadron Mosquito F.II, DZ303, piloted by Pilot Officer Desmon Snape with Flying Officer L. Fowler as his radar operator reported radar contact at 23:15 south of Brandenburg. After three to four minutes of pursuit they encountered a Ju 88 with its position lights on. They attacked the Ju 88 and believed to have damaged it behind its cockpit, but they did not claim a victory. This encounter exactly matches the time and area in which Sayn-Wittgenstein was killed.

Asisbiz database list of 83 aerial victories for Luftwaffe wings Heinrich Prinz zu Sayn-Wittgenstein

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
07-May-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Erg./NJG2 Blenheim     01.20
31-May-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Erg./NJG2 Manchester     01.36
31-May-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Erg./NJG2 Wellington     01.16
02-Jun-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Erg./NJG2 Halifax     00.43
06-Jun-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Erg./NJG2 Wellington     01.16
06-Jun-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Erg./NJG2 Wellington     01.50
09-Jun-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Erg./NJG2 Wellington     03.05
17-Jun-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Erg./NJG2 B-24 Liberator     03.09
17-Jun-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Erg./NJG2 Wellington     03.23
26-Jun-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Erg./NJG2 Wellington     03.07
30-Jun-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Erg./NJG2 Wellington     03.26
03-Jul-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 9./NJG2 Stirling     03.05
03-Jul-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein III./NJG2 Stirling 3215g in See 300m 03.05
24-Jul-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 9./NJG2 Lancaster     03.10
29-Jul-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 9./NJG2 Fulmar     01.11
01-Aug-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 9./NJG2 Hampden     03.17
01-Aug-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 9./NJG2 Halifax     03.30
01-Aug-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 9./NJG2 Wellington     04.42
07-Aug-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 9./NJG2 Halifax     04.15
10-Sep-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 9./NJG2 B-24 Liberator     23.54
10-Sep-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 9./NJG2 Halifax     23.50
10-Sep-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 9./NJG2 Stirling     23.15
16-Sep-42 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 9./NJG2 Stirling     22.52
16-Apr-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3 Map Reference illegible   23.13
16-Apr-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3     23.55
22-Apr-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3 Locations & Height Illegible   23.20
23-Apr-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 B-25 Mitchell sudostw Schweindl   20.30
01-May-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3 SE Eydklau 3800m 22.37
23-Jun-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 1./NJG1 Stirling 05 Ost S/HH 59 4400m 02.09
25-Jun-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 1./NJG1 Wellington 05 Ost S/HJ-44d 200m 03.35
25-Jun-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 1./NJG1 Stirling 05 Ost S/HJ-14g 850m 03.09
25-Jun-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 1./NJG1 Lancaster 05 Ost S/HH-23a 3200m 02.25
25-Jun-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein 1./NJG1 Stirling 05 Ost S/HH-43e 250m 02.50
11-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3 69 58 2200m 21.50
14-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 TB-7 West of Bolkhov 4800m 22.05
14-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3 E Otrada NE Orel 4800m 21.47
17-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3F 50km NE Orel 2000m 21.26
18-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3P 64 821/35 Ost   21.47
18-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 B-25 Mitchell 64 819/35 Ost 2500m 21.39
19-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3 North of Orel 3000m 21.10
19-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3 Stadt Orel 3500m 22.10
19-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 A-20 Boston North of Orel 3000m 21.20
20-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 B-25 Mitchell 10kmm Mtsensk 3500m 21.20
20-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 B-25 Mitchell 10km NE Orel 3500m 21.15
20-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3 15km NE Orel 3500m 21.08
20-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3 North of Orel 4000m 01.30
20-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 TB-7 10km NE Orel 4000m 21.38
20-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 TB-7 10km NE Orel 4000m 21.55
20-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 TB-7 15km NE Orel 4000m 21.50
21-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 B-25 Mitchell Orel 5000m 01.30
22-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 TB-7 5km SE Seschinskaya 4000m 22.25
31-Jul-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 PS-84 44 362/35 Ost 3000m 21.13
01-Aug-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 PS-84 44313/35 Ost 2700m 21.47
01-Aug-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 R-5 44322/35 Ost 1800m 21.40
01-Aug-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 R-5 44153/35 Ost 2600m 23.01
02-Aug-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 R-5 44 323/35 Ost 2500m 21.27
03-Aug-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3F 44 671/35 Ost 4100m 21.12
03-Aug-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3F 44 394/35 Ost 4600m 20.58
03-Aug-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3F 44 372/35 Ost 3800m 22.09
05-Aug-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 B-25 Mitchell 44 384/35 Ost 5300m 22.44
08-Aug-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab IV./NJG5 DB-3F 44 342 2000m 21.50
24-Aug-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab II./NJG3 Halifax NNW Neuhaldensleben 5500m 00.18
18-Oct-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab II./NJG3 4-mot. Flgz. Hannover 6200m 20.35
22-Oct-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab II./NJG3 4-mot. Flzg. 10-20km NNW Kassel 4000m 21.10
22-Oct-43 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab II./NJG3 4-mot. Flzg. vicinity Frankfurt 6100m 21.35
02-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Abschuss      
02-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Abschuss      
02-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Abschuss      
02-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Abschuss      
02-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Abschuss      
02-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Abschuss      
14-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Lancaster     20.00
20-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Halifax bei Berlin 6000m 19.10
20-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Halifax bei Berlin   19.15
20-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Halifax bei Berlin 3200m 19.25
21-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Abschuss      
21-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Abschuss      
21-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Abschuss      
21-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Abschuss      
21-Jan-44 Heinrich zu Sayn-Wittgenstein Stab /NJG2 Abschuss      

Kursk, Kursk Oblast, Russia ‎ Map


Some of the most widely used Magazine References:

  • Airfix Magazines (English) - http://www.airfix.com/
  • Avions (French) - http://www.aerostories.org/~aerobiblio/rubrique10.html
  • FlyPast (English) - http://www.flypast.com/
  • Flugzeug Publikations GmbH (German) - http://vdmedien.com/flugzeug-publikations-gmbh-hersteller_verlag-vdm-heinz-nickel-33.html
  • Flugzeug Classic (German) - http://www.flugzeugclassic.de/
  • Klassiker (German) - http://shop.flugrevue.de/abo/klassiker-der-luftfahrt
  • Le Fana de L'Aviation (French) - http://boutique.editions-lariviere.fr/site/abonnement-le-fana-de-l-aviation-626-4-6.html
  • Le Fana de L'Aviation (French) - http://www.pdfmagazines.org/tags/Le+Fana+De+L+Aviation/
  • Osprey (English) - http://www.ospreypublishing.com/
  • Revi Magazines (Czech) - http://www.revi.cz/

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