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Jagdgeschwader 27 - JG27

Stab I./JG27 Jagdgeschwader 27 - Stab I./JG27

Stab II. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - Stab II./JG27

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-4/Trop Stab II./JG27 White triple chevron flown by Hauptmann Gustav Rodel, Gruppenkommandeur Trapani Airport, Trapani, Italy 1943

Pilots JG27 Gustav Rodel North Africa June 1942 01

Photo 01: Gustav Rodel first saw combat in Spain but achieved his first victory in Poland. He then flew in France and against Britain as Staffelkapitan of 4./JG27 before being posted to North Africa. He received the Ritterkreuz on 22 June 1941 after 20 victories and became Kommandeur of II./JG27 on 20 May 1942. He later took command of the Geschwader, becoming Kommodore on 22 April 1943, and was awarded the Oak Leaves on 20 June 1943.This photograph shows Rodel shortly after receiving the Ritterkreuz.

Pilots Stab II./JG27 Gustav Rodel 01

Stab III. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - Stab III./JG27

Source Profile: Messerschmitt Bf 109 G Over Germany: Pt. 1 (Topcolors 15002) (Author) Marek J Murawski, Arkadiusz Wrobel ISBN 978-83-60445-98-3

Messerschmitt Bf 109G6/Trop Stab III./JG27 ((+I Ernst Dullberg Gruko Italy Oct 1943

Messerschmitt Bf 109G6/Trop Stab III./JG27 ((+I Ernst Dullberg Gruko WNr 140139 Italy Mar 1944

Profile Source Mark Styling http://www.markstyling.com/index.htm

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6 Stab III./JG27 ((+I Ernst Dullberg Gruppenkommandeur WNr. 140139 Italy 1943

Stab IV. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - Stab IV./JG27

1 staffel I Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - 1./JG27

2 Staffel I. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - 2./JG27

3 Staffel I. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - 3./JG27

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-2 3./JG27 (Y14+) Hans-Joachim Marseille Sep 1942

Pilots JG27 Hans-Joachim Marseille 01-05
Hans-Joachim Marseille with a 214Sqn Hurricane

4 staffel II Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - 4./JG27

5. Staffel II. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - 5./JG27

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-2/Trop 5./JG27 (Black 13+-) bar was red abandoned Merdumastill Tunisia 1943

Profiles and Photo Data: When this Bf-109G-2 trap of 5./JG27 was discovered at Merdumastill, it was still armed. Note the traces of the factory code barely visible on the fuselage side and that although the aircraft is coded 'Black 13', the Gruppe bar is red.

6. Staffel II. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - 6./JG27

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6/Trop 5./JG27 (Black 8+-) Trapani Italy summer 1943

Messerschmitt Bf 109G4 6./JG 27 (Yellow 8+-) Italy 1943

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6/Trop 6./JG27 (Y18+-) Sicily 1943

Photograph Source: Avions 90 Page 27

7 staffel III Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - 7./JG27

Messerschmitt Bf 109G6 7./JG27 (White 2+I) Emil Josef Clade Greece 1943

Messerschmitt Bf 109G6 7./JG 27 (W3+I) Franz Stadler Cretan airfield of Kastelli Greece 1944

Messerschmitt Bf 109G6 7./JG27 (White 7+I) Franz Büsen Greece 1944

Messerschmitt Bf 109G6 7./JG 27 (W8+I) Greece 1944

Messerschmitt Bf 109G Oberleutnant Josef-Emil Clade Staffelkapitan of 7./JG27 out of Kalamaki, Greece December 1943

Profiles and Photo Data: Bf 109G 7./JG 27 (W9+I) Rudolf Moycis Italy 1943 00

Messerschmitt Bf 109G6/Trop 7./JG27 (W9+I) Emil Clade Staka Italy Jan 1944

Profile Source Mark Styling http://www.markstyling.com/index.htm

8. Staffel III. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - 8./JG27

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6/R3/R6/Trop 8./JG27 (B6+I) Wolf Ettel Brindisi Italy 17th Jul 1943

Messerschmitt Bf 109G2/Trop 8./JG27 (R1+~) Werner Schroer Maritsa AF Rhodes Greece Feb 1943

Profile Source Mark Styling http://www.markstyling.com/index.htm

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-2 8./JG27 (R1+~) Staffelkapitan Werner Schroer Rhodes Greece 1943

Profiles and Photo Data:Messerschmitt Bf 109G.2 'Red l' flown by Oblt. Werner Schroer, Staffelkapitan of 8.jJG27, Rhodes, early February 1943 This aircraft was finished in a mid-demarcation 78/79 tropical scheme overs prayed with random green patches and had a yellow panel under the engine cowling. The wingtips and fuselage band were white and the predominantly Green 70 spinner had a white segment. Schroer's victory tally appeared only on the left side of the rudder and comprised 60 victory bars.

Photo's 01-02: For a short time in February 1943, 8./JG27 was based on the airfield at Maritsa on the Greek island of Rhodes. These photographs show 'Red 1', a Bf 109G-2 flown by the Staffelkapitan, Oblt. Werner Schroer, in formation with a Bf-109F-4 'Red ;' over the Aegean Sea. Note that the position of the' 1 ' differs on each side of the aircraft and on the starboard side is much closer to the Balkenkreuz. Interestingly, the tailwheel on 'Red ;' is retracted, while that on Schroer's machine has been locked in the down position.

Oblt. Schroer in the cockpit of his Bf 109G-2. Unlike the E and F-series which often had a bullet-proof shield bolted to the front of the windscreen, most aircraft of the G-series had the shield incorporated into the welded framing and positioned a few millimetres behind the Plexiglas windscreen. To keep the space between them clear of condensation, a circular silica gel container, visible at the bottom left of the windscreen, was fitted between the shield and the Plexiglas windscreen to absorb moisture.

Pilots JG27 Werner Schroer 01
Photo 01: Pilots of I./JG27 before their flight to North Africa. On the extreme left is Fw. Werner Schroer and, next to him holding papers, Oblt. Wolfgang Redlich, the Staffelkapitan. Second from the right is Ofw. Albert Espenlaub, wearing a life jacket.

Pilots JG27 Werner Schroer 02-04
Photo's 03-04: Shown left in the photograph above and seated left on the wing of a Bf-109E is Lt. Werner Schroer of I./JG27 who transferred to 8./JG27 as Staffelkapitan in July 1942 and became a successful German pilot in North Africa, second only to the remarkable Hans-Joachim Marseille, with 61 victories claimed before the end of the African campaign.

10 Staffel IV. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - 10./JG27

11 Staffel IV. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - 10./JG27

Messerschmitt Bf 109G6/Trop 11./JG27 (R13+~) Heinrich Bartels Greece Sep 1943

Profile Source Mark Styling http://www.markstyling.com/index.htm

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6 IV./JG27 Red 13+~ flown by Ofw. Heinrich Bartels, Kalamaki, Greece, September 1943

Pilots JG27.4 Heinrich Bartels 01

Messerschmitt Bf 109G IV./JG27 (R13+~) Heinrich Bartels Greece 1943 01
Fw. Heinrich Bartels is showing his 70th victory bar on the rudder of his Messerschmitt Bf 109G-6, Red 13, WNr. 27169, at Kalamaki airfield in Greece on 17 November, 1943.

12 Staffel IV. Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 27 - 12./JG27

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6 12./JG27 Yellow 1+= Dietrich Bosler WNr 18468 Oct 1943

Bf 109G-6 Unit: 12./JG 27 Serial: 1+= W.Nr.18468 Pilot - CO of 12./JG 27 Oberleutnant Dietrich Bosler. October 1943. Camouflage: RLM74/75/76. Note: the aircraft wore unique markings of IV Gruppe - two horizontal stripes (it was used only in JG 27). Propeller spinner is Black with White spiral. Radio-mast has pennant of Staffel commander. White tactical markings only on the undersides.

Artist: © Arkadiusz Wrobel Source: "Messerschmitt Bf.109G/K" by Krzysztof Janowicz. Vol.III. Oficyna Wydawnicza KAGERO. ISBN 83-890880-92-4

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Hans-Joachim Marseille

Units: 1(J)/LG-2 (9/40), JG-52, 3./JG-27, Stafkpt 3./JG-27

Awards: RK(2/22/42)-Br(9/2/42), Ital.Gold Medal for Valor, DK-G(12/1/41), EP(11/3/41), EK 1 & 2, Ftr Oper.Clasp w/'300'

Known Aircraft: Bf 109E-4/B WNr 2032 (25% dam 10/29/40; crashed at Wissant airfield after combat, pilot OK), Bf 109E-7 WNr 5797 (75% dam Emer Land Wissant, pilot OK 9/11/40), Bf 109E-7 WNr 5094 (shot down into Channel 9/23/40; rescued), Bf 109F/Trop WNr 8693 'Yellow 14', Bf 109F WNr 8673 'Yellow 14' as Stafkpt., Bf 109F-4/Trop WNr's 10059 & 10137 (6/17/42), both 'Yellow 14''s, Bf 109G-2/Trop WNr 14256 (no markings, lost 9/30/42)

Remarks: The Star of Afrika Killed in a flying accident 30 Sept. 1942 at Sidi-Abid-el-Rahman. Returning from a mission, the new 109 G-2 #14256 he was flying had a fractured oil line and the AC caught fire. When he bailed out, he struck the vertical stabilizer and failed to open his chute. He was buried 2 October, 1942 at Derna, N. Africa. He flew 383 combat missions. His first victory, a Spitfire over southeast England on 8 September, 1940. 151 victories in the Desert. His 100th, a Hurricane shot down over Gambut airfield, the AC crashing in flames into an AA gun emplacement. EL(6/6/42), S(6/18/42). He shot down an unprecedented 17 AC in one day, 1 September, 1942! Gunther Rall referred to Marseille as the best shot in the Luftwaffe, a brilliant marksman, using an average of only 15 bullets per kill. Flew 109 Werk # 5237 also. Most of the F models were F-4's. His three trusty wingmen were: Rainer Pöttgen, Karl Mentnich and Josef Schlang. Benito Mussolini conferred the Italian Gold Medal for Valor to Marseille for his 1941 Mediterranean service. Hoehler Personality Photo/Profile.

Asisbiz Database of 158 aerial victories for Hans-Joachim Marseille

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location Comments
24-Aug-40 Hans-Joachim Marseille 1.(J)LG2 Spitfire     Kent
02-Sep-40 Hans-Joachim Marseille 1.(J)LG2 Spitfire 4000m   Detling
08-Sep-40 Hans-Joachim Marseille 1.(J)/LG2 Spitfire   09.40 Battle of Britain
11-Sep-40 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3.(J)LG2 Spitfire   17.05 Sudostengland
18-Sep-40 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3.(J)LG2 Spitfire 5000m   Sudostengland
27-Sep-40 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3.(J)LG2 Hurricane 4500m   London
28-Sep-40 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3.(J)LG2 Spitfire 3500-3000m   Sudostengland
23-Apr-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   12.50 uber Tobruk
28-Apr-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Blenheim   09.25 North of Tobruk
01-May-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane I   09.25 5km SE Tobruk
01-May-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane I   09.15 18km S Tobruk
17-Jun-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   18.45 15-20km SE Sidi Omar
17-Jun-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   17.15 NE Gambut
28-Aug-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane I   18.00 3km NW Sidi Barrani
09-Sep-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane I   17.18 SE Bardia
09-Sep-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane I   17.12 SE Bardia
13-Sep-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane I   17.25 South of Bardia
14-Sep-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane I   17.46 South of El Sofafi
24-Sep-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Martin 167   13.30 Gambut
24-Sep-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane I   17.00 Buq Buq
24-Sep-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane I   16.51 Buq Buq
24-Sep-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane I   16.45 Buq Buq
24-Sep-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane I   16.47 Buq Buq
12-Oct-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.15 Bir Sheferzan
12-Oct-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.12 Bir Sheferzan
05-Dec-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   15.25 North Africa
06-Dec-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   12.25 S El Adem
06-Dec-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   12.10 SSE El Adem
07-Dec-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   09.30 20km W Sidi Omar
08-Dec-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.15 20-25km SE El Adem
10-Dec-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.50 SE El Adem
11-Dec-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.30 SE Tmimi
13-Dec-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.00 NE Martuba
13-Dec-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.10 5km NE Tmimi
17-Dec-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.10 WNW Martuba
17-Dec-41 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.28 South of Bucht von Gazala
08-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.25 20km N Martuba
08-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.30 NE Bomba-Bucht
08-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.22 ENE Martuba
08-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.20 NW Bomba-Bucht
12-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.36 35km WNW Tobruk
12-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.33 23km NW Tobruk
12-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.32 20km NW Tobruk
12-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.30 10km NW Tobruk
13-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane II   09.25 23km ESE Tobruk
13-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane II   09.20 20km SE Tobruk
15-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.03 5km SW Gambut
15-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.00 3km WSW Gambut
21-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.10 10km W Fort Acroma
21-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.18 20km NE Fort Acroma
27-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.12 10km ENE Fort Acroma
27-Feb-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.00 10km ENE Ain-el-Gazala
25-Apr-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   10.08 10km N Ain-el-Gazala
25-Apr-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   10.06 2km N Ain-el-Gazala
10-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   09.15 25km SE Martuba
10-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   09.13 25km SE Martuba
13-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.15 14km ESE Gazala--Bucht
13-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.10 16km SE Ain-el-Gazala
16-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   18.15 3km E Fort Acroma
16-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.05 20 k E Ain-el-Gazala
19-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Kittyhawk   07.20 8km SW Fort Acroma
19-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Kittyhawk   07.30 5km S Fort Acroma
23-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 A-20 Boston III   11.06 4km SE Hafen Tobruk
23-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 A-20 Boston III   11.05 3km SE Hafen Tobruk
30-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Kittyhawk   06.05 1km NW El Adem
31-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.34 10km SW Fort Acroma
31-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.28 8km W Bir-el-Harmat
31-May-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.26 5km W Bir-el-Harmat
01-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   19.15 20km ENE El-Cheimar
03-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.22 3km West of Bir Hacheim
03-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.33 7km West of Bir Hacheim
03-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.29 10km West of Bir Hacheim
03-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.28 7km West of Bir Hacheim
03-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.25 5km West of Bir Hacheim
03-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.27 5km West of Bir Hacheim
07-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.13 10km NE El Adem
07-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.10 SW El Adem
10-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.50 6km ENE Mteifel Chebir
10-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.35 5km NW Mteifel Chebir
10-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.41 6km NE Mteifel Chebir
10-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.45 6km E Mteifel Chebir
11-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane II   16.25 18km NW El Adem
11-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.25 SW El Adem
13-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.14 2km NNE El Adem
13-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane II   18.15 3km ENE El Adem
13-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.10 5km W El Adem
13-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.11 3km NE El Adem
15-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.01 6km NW El Adem
15-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.02 4km NNW El Adem
15-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.04 8km NE El Adem
15-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.06 3km NNE El Adem
16-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   18.02 17km SW El Adem
16-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.10 5km E El Adem
16-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.11 5km NNE El Adem
16-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.13 10km N El Adem
17-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane II   12.08 6km SW Gambut
17-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane II   12.09 2km S Gambut
17-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.05 4km SW Gambut
17-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.03 3km W Gambut
17-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.02 5km W Gambut
17-Jun-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   12.12 SE Sidi Omar
31-Aug-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   18.25 15km ostw Alam el Halfa
31-Aug-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   10.03 25km ssE El-Alamein
31-Aug-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Hurricane   10.04 26km ssE El-Alamein
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.02 12km E Alam-el-Halfa
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.53 7km SSW El-Imayid
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.50 9km ssE El-Imayid
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.49 6km SE El-Imayid
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.48 8km S El-Imayid
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.47 7km S El-Imayid
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.05 23km E Alam-el-Halfa
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.03 20km E Alam-el-Halfa
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.01 7km ESE Alam-el-Halfa
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.59 15km SE Alam-el-Halfa
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.58 10km SE Alam-el-Halfa
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.56 15km SE Alam-el-Halfa
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.55 20km S Alam-el-Halfa
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   08.39 18km SSE El-Imayid
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.35 18km SSE El-Imayid
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.26 18km SSE El-Imayid
01-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.28 20km SSE El-Imayid
02-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.16 25km SE El-Imayid
02-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   15.21 18km SE El-Alamein
02-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.18 30km ssE El-Imayid
02-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   15.18 20km SE El-Alamein
02-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   09.24 10km S El-Imayid
03-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   07.20 25km SW El-Hammam
03-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   07.23 27km SW El-Hammam
03-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   07.28 30km SW El-Hammam
03-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   15.08 uber El-Imayid
03-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   15.10 2km SW El-Imayid
03-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   15.42 40km SSE El-Alamain
05-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   10.48 13km SE El-Alamein
05-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   11.00 SSE El-Imayid
05-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   10.49 SE El-Alamein
05-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   10.51 SSE El-Imayid
06-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   17.03 SE El-Alamein
06-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   17.14 SSW El-Alamein
06-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   17.16 SSW El-Alamein
06-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   17.20 SSW El-Alamein
07-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   17.43 SE El-Alamein
07-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   17.45 10km SW El-Hammam
11-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   07.42 5km WSW El-Imayid
11-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   07.40 15km SE El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.01 18km SW El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.02 19km SW El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.59 20km SW El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   16.57 26km SW El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   16.54 27km SW El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.53 28km SW El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.51 25km SW El-Alamein
26-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   09.15 14km SW El-Alamein
26-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   09.16 15km SW El-Alamein
26-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   16.56 SW El-Imayid
26-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   16.59 10km ssE El-Imayid
26-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   09.13 14km SW El-Alamein
26-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 Spitfire   17.10 10km S El-Hammam
26-Sep-42 Hans-Joachim Marseille 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.10 12km SW El-Alamein

With two recent British counter-offensives having been repulsed, the stand-off on the ground continued. But now I./JG27 began to probe even deeper into Egyptian airspace, often staging through Gambut, a complex of airfields closer to the frontier, in order to increase their combat radius. Towards the close of a relatively uneventful August the newly promoted Leutnant Hans-Joachim Marseille, who had not scored for over two months, claimed a South African Air Force (SAAF) Hurricane just off the coast of Egypt near Sidi Barrani.It was Marseille's 14th victory. On 9 September he downed two more Hurricanes over Bardia, an important Axis base, and port, 12 miles (19 km) inside the Libyan frontier. On both 13 and 14 September Marseille was credited with single Hurricanes.

And then something extraordinary happened.
Hans-Joachim Marseille himself later described 24 September 1941 as ‘the day everything suddenly fell into place'. It was on this date that his innate skills – long suspected by such as Hauptmann Neumann, but never before properly displayed – all fused as one to enable him to shoot down a quartet of Hurricanes and a twin-engined Martin Maryland bomber.

These victories boosted Marseille's score to 23. It would take several more weeks of combat to hone his ‘almost uncanny' talents to perfection, but soon the young Berliner's lethal abilities became the stuff of legends: his remarkable eyesight, which meant he could detect the smallest of specks in the far distance vital seconds before anybody else; his complete mastery of aerobatics, which invariably allowed him to place himself in a position of tactical advantage; the ferocity of the assault upon his chosen target; the computer-like instinct which told him the exact moment to open fire in any given situation, however great the angle; the precision marksmanship to hit the vital spot.

In fact, it was later calculated that Marseille required an average of only 15 rounds to despatch an opponent – far fewer than any other Luftwaffe fighter pilot. He often returned from sorties which had netted him multiple kills – sometimes as many as six – with more than half his ammunition still in its magazines! Many rated him the best shot in the Luftwaffe.
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Africa - The 'Finest Hour'
…an extract from Osprey's Aviation Elite Units No.12 Jagdgeschwader 27 'Afrika' by John Weal
 
Osprey Publishing has kindly supplied the following Chapter-length extract from Aviation Elite Units 12: Jagdgeschwader 27 'Afrika'.
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Africa - The 'Finest Hour'

The presence of the Wehrmacht in North Africa, like its intervention in Greece, was due in no small measure to the military incompetence of Hitler's Axis ally, Mussolini. Just as the Italian invasion of Greece had not merely foundered on the rock of Greek resistance, but had been pushed back into Albania whence it came, so the Italian advance into Egypt in September 1940 was not simply stopped cold by British and Commonwealth troops, it was driven back halfway across Libya to the port of Benghazi and beyond.

It was to prevent the total loss of Italy's African colony that Hitler was persuaded early in 1941 to send a token ‘containing' force, built around the 5th Light and 15th Panzer Divisions, to his southern partner's aid. The Führer's plans were purely defensive. He warned the force commander, one Generalleutnant Erwin Rommel, that ‘no large-scale operations were to be carried out in North Africa until the autumn'. But Rommel had ideas of his own as to how the desert war should be fought. Realising that the British forces opposing him were both overstretched and understrength, he quickly began to prepare for a ‘reconnaissance in force'.

By the time the first elements of I./JG27 touched down on the cleared stretch of desert that was Ain-el-Gazala airfield on 18 April 1941, Rommel's ‘reconnaissance' had exploded into a full-blown offensive. He had already retaken all of Libya – with the exception of Tobruk – and his troops had reached the Egyptian frontier at Sollum.

As Hauptmann Eduard Neumann's Bf-109s were the first single-engined Luftwaffe fighters to be sent to Africa, they were thrown into the thick of the fighting almost immediately upon arrival. And with the situation along the Libyan/Egyptian border at a temporary stalemate, this fighting was concentrated around the perimeter of Tobruk, whose garrison – although surrounded – was a thorn in Rommel's side, and a potential threat to his line of supply.

On 19 April I./JG27 claimed its first four victories – all Hurricanes – along the 37-mile (60-km) stretch of coast separating Gazala from Tobruk. One of the pair shot down by Oberleutnant Karl-Wolfgang Redlich, Kapitän of 1. Staffel, provided I./JG27 with its 100th victory of the war. Another was the first kill for Leutnant Werner Schroer, who would end the war as the Geschwaderkommodore of JG3 ‘Udet', wearing the Swords, and with the distinction of being one of the few Luftwaffe pilots credited with more than 100 RAF and USAAF aircraft destroyed.

The fourth of that day's Hurricanes had gone to Unteroffizier Hans Sippel. Twenty-four hours later he would claim a Wellington, also over Gazala, only to become JG27's first African casualty the day after that when he himself was shot down and killed over Tobruk on 21 April.

It was on 23 April that Oberfähnrich Hans-Joachim Marseille claimed his first success as a member of JG27 – another Hurricane over Tobruk. This prompted ‘Edu' Neumann to remark that ‘we'll make a proper fighter pilot out of you yet'. The Gruppenkommandeur never spoke a truer word. But with just eight kills under his belt, Marseille was still a long way behind I./JG27's leading trio of scorers.

These three, Oberleutnants Ludwig Franzisket, Karl-Wolfgang Redlich and Gerhard Homuth, all had totals climbing into the high teens. This meant they were nearing the ‘magic 20', which was still the official yardstick for the award of the Knight's Cross – the astronomical scores of the eastern front had yet to make themselves felt! And, indeed, all three would receive the prestigious decoration in the coming weeks.

On the morning of 1 May 3./JG27 clashed with a squadron of Hurricanes south of Tobruk. Staffelkapitän Gerhard Homuth and Hans-Joachim Marseille – the latter now flying as a Schwarmführer (leader of a four-aircraft section) – downed a pair of enemy fighters each. By now the few remaining Hurricanes based within the Tobruk perimeter had been withdrawn to Egypt. Their departure coincided with the easing of Rommel's latest, unsuccessful, attempt to overrun the garrison. As both sides paused to draw breath and regroup, the following fortnight saw just three victories for the Gruppe, all claimed by Gerhard Homuth.

Freed from the restraints of their Stuka-escort and patrol duties over a now fighterless Tobruk (henceforward the ‘fortress' would have to rely almost entirely on its own anti-aircraft defences for protection against air attack), I./JG27 began to venture further eastwards towards the Egyptian border. And its was here that action flared up again on 21 May when 3. Staffel intercepted a raid by Blenheim bombers. They shot down five of the No 14 Sqn machines, two of which took Gerhard Homuth's score to 22 and won him the Knight's Cross.

But such successes against bombers would be very much the exception, rather than the rule, in the months ahead. JG27's desert war was to remain one of predominantly fighter combat throughout. And four weeks after intercepting the Blenheims – having added a further dozen Hurricanes to its growing scoresheet in the interim – I./JG27 met for the first time the one Allied fighter which, above all others, was to be its principal opponent, and which alone would account for almost exactly half the 600 kills the Gruppe would claim during its time in North Africa.

When 1. Staffel bounced a formation of unfamiliar enemy fighters just beyond the Egyptian border in the early morning of 18 June, they logged their three successes simply as ‘Brewsters'. In fact, they were Curtiss Tomahawks of the reformed No 250 Sqn RAF. One of the trio was victory number 21 for Staffelkapitän Wolfgang Redlich, and resulted in the Gruppe's second African Knight's Cross. It would be another month before the third was awarded. This followed the destruction of a Hurricane (wrongly identified as a Tomahawk!) over the Gulf of Sollum by Gruppen-Adjutant Ludwig Franzisket on 19 July.

With two recent British counter-offensives having been repulsed, the stand-off on the ground continued. But now I./JG27 began to probe even deeper into Egyptian airspace, often staging through Gambut, a complex of airfields closer to the frontier, in order to increase their combat radius. Towards the close of a relatively uneventful August the newly promoted Leutnant Hans-Joachim Marseille, who had not scored for over two months, claimed a South African Air Force (SAAF) Hurricane just off the coast of Egypt near Sidi Barrani.It was Marseille's 14th victory. On 9 September he downed two more Hurricanes over Bardia, an important Axis base, and port, 12 miles (19 km) inside the Libyan frontier. On both 13 and 14 September Marseille was credited with single Hurricanes.

And then something extraordinary happened.

Hans-Joachim Marseille himself later described 24 September 1941 as ‘the day everything suddenly fell into place'. It was on this date that his innate skills – long suspected by such as Hauptmann Neumann, but never before properly displayed – all fused as one to enable him to shoot down a quartet of Hurricanes and a twin-engined Martin Maryland bomber.

These victories boosted Marseille's score to 23. It would take several more weeks of combat to hone his ‘almost uncanny' talents to perfection, but soon the young Berliner's lethal abilities became the stuff of legends: his remarkable eyesight, which meant he could detect the smallest of specks in the far distance vital seconds before anybody else; his complete mastery of aerobatics, which invariably allowed him to place himself in a position of tactical advantage; the ferocity of the assault upon his chosen target; the computer-like instinct which told him the exact moment to open fire in any given situation, however great the angle; the precision marksmanship to hit the vital spot.

In fact, it was later calculated that Marseille required an average of only 15 rounds to despatch an opponent – far fewer than any other Luftwaffe fighter pilot. He often returned from sorties which had netted him multiple kills – sometimes as many as six – with more than half his ammunition still in its magazines! Many rated him the best shot in the Luftwaffe.

The ‘Star of Africa' was at long last in the ascendant. And I./JG27's imminent re-equipment with the Bf-109F would transform the rise into one of meteoric proportions.

It was the arrival of Hauptmann Wolfgang Lippert's II. Gruppe at Ain-el-Gazala towards the end of September which permitted I./JG27 to rotate back to Germany, one Staffel at a time, to exchange its war-weary Emils for brand new Friedrichs. The whole process would take well over a month.

Assuming the mantle of I. Gruppe, II./JG27 soon got into its African stride. On 3 October the unit claimed a trio of Hurricanes just across the Egyptian border. Forty-eight hours later another pair went down, and on 6 October it was three more Hurricanes and a brace of Tomahawks. Just like I./JG27, II. Gruppe also had its established Experten, and those who were still on the way up. Of these first ten kills in North Africa, three each had been credited to Oberleutnant Gustav Rödel, the Knight's Cross-wearing Kapitän of 4./JG27, and to one of the more promising NCO pilots of his Staffel, Oberfeldwebel Otto Schulz. This took their scores to 24 and 12 respectively.

But II./JG27 would inevitably suffer its share of casualties too. And the first combat fatality was 5. Staffel's Leutnant Gustav-Adolf Langanke, shot down by return fire from a formation of SAAF Marylands he was attacking near Sidi Omar on 7 October.

It was Otto Schulz who brought down a Bristol Bombay near Ain-el-Gazala on the morning of 27 November, taking off, claiming his victim, and landing again all in the space of just three minutes! Only a handful of these elderly twin-engined transports would appear on JG27's African scoresheets – twice with some significance. On this occasion the No 216 Sqn machine was one of five carrying troops of the embryonic Special Air Service (SAS) on their first ever large-scale raid behind enemy lines. Their objective was to destroy the aircraft dispersed on the five Luftwaffe airfields in the Gazala-Tmimi area as the prelude to a major British offensive scheduled to be launched the following day.

In the event, the SAS operation was ‘not merely a failure, it was a debacle'. But the offensive opened on 18 November as planned. Intended to relieve Tobruk and drive Rommel's forces out of Cyrenaica (the eastern half of Libya), Operation Crusader would achieve both its aims.

Even nature lent a hand. Heavy rainstorms during the night of 17/18 November had turned the Gazala airfields into quagmires of mud, making it extremely difficult for the Bf-109s to operate. But an improvement in conditions soon led to fierce clashes between the opposing fighter forces. On 22 November II./JG27 claimed at least ten Tomahawks, plus three Blenheims, in a series of engagements to the south of Tobruk. It lost four of its own machines, with two pilots being wounded. One, Leutnant Karl Scheppa of the Stabsschwarm, would be killed the following day when a bomb hit the Italian field hospital to which he had been taken.

Two of 22 November's Tomahawks had been downed by Gruppenkommandeur Hauptmann Wolfgang Lippert. Twenty-four hours later he added a Hurricane, but then his own machine was severely damaged. In baling out behind the British lines, he struck the tailplane and broke both his legs. At first the fractures appeared uncomplicated. After admittance to a Cairo hospital, however, it was discovered that gangrene had set in. Lippert refused the double amputation which offered the only chance of saving his life. In the end he relented, although by then it was too late. The operation was carried out on 3 December, but he died of a massive embolism only minutes after completion of the surgery. Wolfgang Lippert was buried by the British with full military honours.

Meanwhile, 1./JG27 had returned to the fray in its new Friedrichs. The Staffel's first victory, a Tomahawk claimed on 12 November, had been a shared kill which, uncommon in the Jagdwaffe, had been credited to the unit as a whole. 1./JG27 too had been involved in the heavy fighting of 22 and 23 November, the unit's total for the two days being 14 enemy aircraft destroyed, exactly half of them falling to Staffelkapitän Wolfgang Redlich. The Staffel lost two of its own NCOs shot down and captured.

By the end of the first week of December 3./JG27 was also back in action – an event which Leutnant Hans-Joachim Marseille had duly marked by claiming four Hurricanes in three days. This raised his total to 29, and brought him level with his Staffelkapitän, Oberleutnant Gerhard Homuth. In a spirit of friendly rivalry, the race between the two was now on. Of the Gruppe's two other top scorers, Wolfgang Redlich was still in the lead with 36. But on 5 December, the day his latest victim had gone down south of Bir-el-Gobi, he received a posting to the office of the General Staff. His replacement at the head of 1. Staffel, Oberleutnant Ludwig Franzisket, was currently standing at 24.

Such individual successes in the air were not enough to halt the dangers developing on the desert floor below. After a shaky start, Operation Crusader was by now gathering momentum. The Luftwaffe's forward airfields around Gambut had already been captured. And on 7 December 1941 – the day the world learned of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour – the long siege of Tobruk was finally lifted. This posed a direct threat to the Gazala complex, the next objective in the path of the advancing British armour. I. and II./JG27 were forced to vacate their base on that same 7 December. The nearly eight months which I. Gruppe had spent at Ain-el-Gazala would be the longest deployment at any one field throughout JG27's entire time in North Africa.

The Gruppen's first step on the long withdrawal back across Cyrenaica was but a short hop from Gazala. Tmimi, where it would remain for only five days, had witnessed III./JG27's arrival from Germany just 24 hours earlier on 6 December. And when all three Gruppen were joined there by Oberstleutnant Bernhard Woldenga's Stab on 10 December, it meant that, for the first time since the Battle of Britain, the complete Geschwader was once again operating as a single entity – albeit in the midst of a general retreat!

For JG27's Friedrichs, it was very much a fighting retreat. On the day of the Geschwaderstab's arrival in North Africa, the desert-wise I. Gruppe was up in force. Hans-Joachim Marseille added another Tomahawk to his lengthening list, while Hauptmann Erich Gerlitz's 2. Staffel downed all but one of a group of six unescorted SAAF Bostons. But I./JG27 was about to lose its two most successful NCO pilots under circumstances that were more than just unfortunate.

On 13 December Oberfeldwebel Albert Espenlaub of 1. Staffel, who had scored 11 of his 14 victories in the last month alone, was bested in combat near El Adem. He managed to belly-land his ‘White 11' and was taken prisoner, only to be shot later in the day while attempting to escape from his captors. Less easy to explain and condone is the loss of 2. Staffel's Oberfeldwebel Hermann Förster the following day. Förster's 13th, and last, kill had been one of the South African Bostons. Now, in a dogfight with Australian Tomahawks over recently abandoned Tmimi, his machine was hit and he was forced to bale out. He was fired upon and killed in his parachute.

By this time III./JG27 had opened its desert account too. Unsurprisingly, perhaps, it was the Geschwader's most successful pilot, and sole Oak Leaves wearer, who had been responsible for its first two Allied fighters brought down near Tmimi on 12 December. These took Oberleutnant Erbo Graf von Kageneck's overall total to 67. But experience gained in Russia did not guarantee immunity in North Africa, and on 24 December it was von Kageneck who was at the receiving end of a burst from a No 94 Sqn Hurricane over Agedabia.

Although seriously wounded in the stomach, he reportedly managed to nurse his crippled fighter back the 46 miles (75 km) to the Gruppe's then base at Magrun and pull off an emergency landing. He was immediately evacuated, first to a hospital in Athens, and then to another in Naples where, despite intensive care, he died from his injuries on12 January 1942.

By the final week of 1941 JG27 had completed its withdrawal across Cyrenaica. The whole Geschwader was now gathered on landing grounds around the Arco Philaenorum. This was a grandiose arch, spanning the coast road, which had been erected by Mussolini to mark the dividing line between the two provinces of his Libyan empire: Cyrenaica to the east, Tripolitania to the west.

Having had to abandon and blow up a number of their machines on almost every one of the half-dozen or so airfields they had occupied, however briefly, during the recent retreat, the Gruppen were in something of a sorry state. But although bloody, they were unbowed. On the morning of 25 December Major Neumann, Kommandeur of I./JG27, summoned the Kapitän of his 1. Staffel, Oberleutnant Ludwig Franzisket.

‘We've got just four serviceable '109s left, 'Ziskus'. Fly up and down the coast road at medium height so that the ground troops can get to see a few German aircraft for Christmas at least.'

Oberleutnant Franzisket did as he was bid, but the effect was the very opposite to that intended. The traffic along Rommel's one major supply route had been subjected to Allied fighter-bomber attacks too many times in the past. As soon as the four aircraft were spotted approaching, every vehicle screeched to a halt as its occupants dived for cover at the side of the road. The end came as the Bf-109s circled above an Italian encampment near El Agheila. A well-placed 20 mm anti-aircraft round shattered Franzisket's canopy, sending a shower of splinters into his face and eyes. The wounds required specialist medical treatment, and 1. Staffel would not see their Kapitän again until March 1942.

Franzisket did not miss very much. By mid-January 1942 Operation Crusader had all but run its course. True, General Auchinleck's latest offensive had retaken nearly all the ground captured – and then lost – during General Wavell's pursuit of the Italian army across Cyrenaica a year earlier, but it had not engaged and destroyed the core of Rommel's forces. And it was the latter who now staged a surprise counter-attack.

On 29 January Rommel recaptured Benghazi (the fourth time the capital of Cyrenaica had changed hands in less than a year!), and by mid-February he was once again in possession of the airfields around Derna. Here the wily ‘Desert Fox' would pause for the next three months.

Aerial activity during this period has since been described as ‘limited'. But such a term is relative, and the high scorers of JG27 were still taking their toll of enemy machines. In February the entire Geschwader moved back up to fields around Martuba, to the south-east of the Derna complex. Here, they would operate in conjunction with other Luftwaffe units stationed in the area, including the Stukas of I./StG 3, as the NahkampfGruppe Martuba (Martuba Close-support Group). Commanded by the Kommodore of
JG27, this ad hoc force was later rechristened the Gefechtsverband (Combat unit) Woldenga.

On 9 February 3./JG27's Gerhard Homuth and Hans-Joachim Marseille had been level at 40 kills each. By month's end, however, the mercurial young Berliner was beginning to draw steadily ahead of his Staffelkapitän. Likewise, across at II. Gruppe, Otto Schulz – heaving downed five Tomahawks in ten minutes on 15 February – was also forging ahead of Gustav Rödel, Kapitän of 4. Staffel.

Leutnant Hans-Joachim Marseille and Oberfeldwebel Otto Schulz were each finally awarded the Knight's Cross on 22 February (for 50 and 44 victories respectively, the original ‘20-kill' benchmark having long gone by the board). For Marseille, it was the first significant official recognition (since the German Cross) of a burgeoning combat career that would see him wearing the Diamonds little more than six months later. For Schulz, it heralded the approaching end. Promoted to Oberleutnant and appointed II./JG27's Gruppen-TO, he would be shot down and killed claiming his 51st victim, a Hurricane of No 274 Sqn, during a freie Jagd mission near Sidi Rezegh on 17 June.

On 23 March III./JG27 had sent a small detachment to Crete. Based at Kastelli, the Jagdkommando Kreta would be slowly strengthened during the remaining months of the year as the eastern Mediterranean island grew in strategic significance. Commanded since near the close of their eastern front service by Hauptmann Erhard ‘Jack' Braune (Max Dobislav having been appointed chief instructor at JFS 1 Werneuchen), III. Gruppe was already beginning to see itself as the Geschwader's ‘jack-of-all-trades' unit. This view was reinforced on 5 May when a fourth Staffel was added to its numbers. As its designation indicates, 10.(Jabo)/JG27 was intended specifically for the fighter-bomber role.

On 18 April ‘Edu' Neumann had organised the desert equivalent of a village fete to celebrate the anniversary of his Gruppe's first year in Africa. The bare expanse of Martuba was transformed by a colourful and motley collection of home-made stalls, sideshows and roundabouts. Guests from all the neighbouring German and Italian units were invited to the day-long festivities. But for I. and II. Gruppen's Experten it was soon back to business as usual. On 20 May Oberleutnant Gustav Rödel was appointed Kommandeur of II./JG27. He replaced Hauptmann Erich Gerlitz, who was to take over III./JG53, currently flying in to Martuba from Sicily to bolster the Luftwaffe's fighter presence in North Africa.

Two of the twelve Tomahawks and Kittyhawks claimed by II. Gruppe on 23 May were credited to the new Kommandeur, taking Rödel's total to 41. I. Gruppe's Oberleutnant Marseille was also regularly scoring daily doubles during this period. The two bombers he downed south-east of Tobruk on 23 May – victories number 63 and 64, claimed as Douglas DB-7s – were, in reality, a pair of No 223 Sqn Martin Baltimores flying that unit's first operational mission with the new type.

Three days later, on 26 May, Generaloberst Erwin Rommel launched the offensive which would take his Afrika Korps all the way to El Alamein. But first he had to smash a breach in the Allied lines, which now stretched from Gazala, on the coast, some 40 miles (65 km) inland down into the desert to the fortress of Bir Hacheim.

Released from their Gefechtsverband Woldenga duties, JG27's fighters, reinforced by Gerlitz's III./JG53, played a decisive part in the first six weeks of chaotic fighting that was the Battle of Gazala. On 3 June Hans-Joachim Marseille had his most successful day yet, destroying six Tomahawks in little more than ten minutes to the west of Bir Hacheim. Remarkably, he achieved this feat using just his two machine-guns, as his cannon having jammed after firing only ten rounds! These six Tomahawks of No 5 Sqn SAAF raised Marseille's total to 75, for which he was awarded the Oak Leaves on 6 June.

At the other end of the scale Oberstleutnant Bernhard Woldenga had not added to the four victories he had achieved in Russia. In fact, ill-health had prevented him from leading the Geschwader on operations over the desert. And on 10 June he was promoted to the first of the staff postings which would elevate him to the position of Jafü Balkan. He did, however, leave one tangible memento of his time as CO of the Geschwader – a Stab emblem based on the shield he had earlier designed for I./JG1. The main difference was that the three small Bf-109 silhouettes were now pointing upwards. Critics of the original badge had expressed the view that the nose-down attitude of its three fighters suggested they were fleeing!

Woldenga's departure set in train a whole string of new appointments. Major Eduard Neumann replaced him as Geschwaderkommodore, Hauptmann Gerhard Homuth became Kommandeur of I./JG27 and Oberleutnant Hans-Joachim Marseille took over as Kapitän of 3. Staffel.

Exactly one week later, on 17 June, a brace each of Tomahawks and Hurricanes, claimed near Gambut, took Marseille's score to 99. He was exhausted and ready to call it a day but, encouraged by the other three members of his Schwarm – ‘Come on, Jochen, now for the hundredth!' – he felt honour-bound to oblige.

A lone Hurricane shot down in flames into an anti-aircraft emplacement south of Gambut airfield made Hans-Joachim Marseille only the 11th Luftwaffe fighter pilot to reach a century – but the first to achieve this total against the western Allies alone!

He even found time to go into a steep climb three minutes after despatching the low-level Hurricane in order to add number 101 (a high-flying photo-reconnaissance Spitfire which, if identified correctly, was the first for the Geschwader since the Battle of Britain), before returning to the familiar surroundings of Ain-el-Gazala, which I./JG27 had re-occupied just 24 hours earlier.

The following day, 18 June, Marseille departed in a Ju 52/3m for Berlin, where he was to be presented with the Swords to his Oak Leaves. He was delighted with the ceremonial of the occasion, but revelled even more in the rapturous welcome his hometown accorded him during his subsequent weeks' leave. It was the celebrities and stars whose attention he had once courted who were now falling over themselves to be seen in the company of the Reich's newest national hero.

Meanwhile, back in the desert things were happening fast. On 21 June the ‘fortress' of Tobruk, which had withstood an eight-month siege the year before, had been taken within a matter of days. Seventy-two hours later the Afrika Korps crossed the Egyptian border in force. Rommel's Panzers did not stop until they bumped into the main Allied line of defence, the northern flank of which was anchored at a small halt on the coastal railway called El Alamein.

During this period ‘Jack' Braune's somewhat overshadowed III. Gruppe were also achieving a number of successes. On 15 June Oberleutnant Hans-Joachim Heinecke – Kapitän of 9./JG27, and recently posted in from JG53 with 18 kills already to his credit – had claimed the Geschwader's first four-engined heavy bomber . . . a portent of things to come! The B-24 Liberator had been part of a small Anglo-American force searching for Italian naval units off the Egyptian coast.

Another of Braune's newly-appointed Staffelkapitäne, Leutnant Werner Schroer of 8./JG27 (ex-Adjutant of I. Gruppe), also began to make his presence felt. Taking over on 23 June with his score standing at 11, he would more than double this figure within a fortnight.

Between 24 and 26 June Major Neumann's Stab and all three Gruppen staged forward from their fields around Gazala and Tmimi, via Gambut, to gather briefly at Sidi Barrani. It was the first time their wheels had touched down on Egyptian soil – or should that be sand? In the next couple of weeks JG27's fighters would move up closer still to the Alamein front, as both sides prepared for the decisive battle which neither could afford to lose. From early July until late October I. and II. Gruppen would operate primarily out of Quotaifiya, little more than 30 miles (50 km) from the frontline.

Throughout July Homuth and Rödel's pilots whittled away at the opposition. Their victims included nearly every operational type to be found in the Allied Air Forces' armoury – and possibly one that wasn't, for the ‘Gladiator' claimed by 2. Staffel's Leutnant Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt near El Daba on 7 July appears more likely, in retrospect, to have been an Italian CR.42! Unabashed, ‘Fifi' Stahlschmidt brought down a trio of Hurricanes the next day, taking his score to 30, before adding a further 17 kills by mid-August to earn himself a Knight's Cross.

It was another imminent Knight's Cross winner, Feldwebel Günther Steinhausen of 1. Staffel, who was credited with JG27's second B-24. One of six USAAF machines sent to attack an Axis convoy on 9 July, B-24D Eager Beaver went down into the sea in flames. The bomber was victory number 34 for Steinhausen. His total was standing at 40 when he
himself crashed to his death during a dogfight south-east of El Alamein on 6 September. Promotion to Leutnant and award of the Knight's Cross were both posthumous.

Twenty-four hours after Steinhausen was posted missing, Leutnant Stahlschmidt, by then Kapitän of 2. Staffel, would be lost in similar circumstances, and in the same area. He, too, would be honoured posthumously, being awarded the Oak Leaves for his final total of 59 desert victories.

Coincidentally, one Knight's Cross had been awarded on 6 September. It went to 2./JG27's Leutnant Friedrich Körner, a 36-victory Experte who had also been shot down in combat near El Alamein two months earlier on 4 July, but who had survived to become a PoW.

July had also seen Geschwader-Adjutant Hauptmann Ernst Düllberg continue a tradition which had been started back in the days of the Battle of Britain and the Balkans by claiming the Geschwaderstab's one and only kill of the entire North African campaign – a Hurricane south-west of Alamein in the early evening of the 13th.

It was on 7 August that a Schwarm from 5./JG27, led by Oberfeldwebel Emil Clade, chanced upon another of the occasional Bombay transports of No 216 Sqn. But this machine was not carrying SAS troops (who had long since taken to using jeeps for their forays behind Axis lines). It was instead on the daily flight from Heliopolis to pick up wounded from the front for transport back to hospital in Cairo.

At one forward landing ground, however, the Bombay's 18-year-old pilot, Sgt H E James, was ordered to wait for a special passenger. This turned out to be Lt Gen W H E Gott, who, only hours previously, had been appointed Commander of the 8th Army, and who now needed to get back to Cairo for an urgent meeting.

Rather than fly at the stipulated 50 ft (15 m) to escape the attentions of Axis fighters, the pilot elected to climb to 500 ft (150 m) on account of an overheating engine. It was his undoing. Clade's first pass forced the lumbering Bombay to crash-land in the desert to the south-east of Alexandria. Some of the crew and passengers attempted to escape from the still moving machine. All but one of those remaining inside, including Gott, were killed when Unteroffizier Bernd Schneider carried out a strafing run to finish off the stricken machine. Lt Gen Gott was the highest ranked British soldier to be killed by enemy fire in World War 2. His death led to the hurried appointment of a replacement commander for the 8th Army – a relative unknown named Bernard Law Montgomery.

The Bombay was 5. Staffel's only claim for the fortnight between 4 and 19 August. Over the same period all that 6./JG27 managed to bring down was a pair of Kittyhawks. But the remaining 4. Staffel of II. Gruppe – or, to be more precise, just one Schwarm of that Staffel – submitted claims during that time for no fewer than 59 Allied fighters destroyed! This huge discrepancy in numbers, and the lack of any witnesses other than the Schwarm members themselves, gave rise to grave suspicions. But rather than take the matter to higher authority, and possibly throw doubt and disrepute on the rest of the Gruppe, it was decided simply to break up the offending Schwarm. It should be noted that a full two months were to pass before the erstwhile Schwarmführer claimed his next victory, and that one of his NCO pilots disappeared over the Mediterranean on 19 August ‘for reasons unknown' (some suggested he chose deliberately to dive into the sea rather than face accusations of making false claims and possible court-martial). The other two, however, went on to attain legitimate and respectable scores.

While tension may have been high at Quotaifiya, life for III./JG27 at Quasaba during August was more hum-drum. Only three Kittyhawks were added to the Gruppe's scoreboard, and much of the month was spent on coastal convoy patrol duties. 10.(Jabo) Staffel, which had carried out fighter-bomber raids on targets as far afield as Alexandria early in July, was now being employed against vehicle parks and gun emplacements closer to the front. And at the end of August the Staffel was withdrawn from III. Gruppe's control altogether to become part of the autonomous JaboGruppe Afrika. Finally, 31 August also saw the loss of Oberleutnant Hermann Tangerding, Kapitän of 7. Staffel, who took a direct anti-aircraft hit during a Stuka escort mission south of El Alamein. III. Gruppe's woes were not echoed back at I./JG27's Quotaifiya dispersals. And for good reason. Wearing his Swords, the Kapitän of 3. Staffel was back in Africa, and back in business. On that same 31 August Oberleutnant Marseille had claimed a couple of Hurricanes in the morning, likewise while escorting Stukas south-east of El Alamein, plus a single Spitfire in the early evening.

But it was the events of the following day which are still a source of no little controversy. Many, including RAF pilots who fought in the desert war, question the validity of Marseille's claims for the 17 Allied fighters he is reported to have shot down on 1 September (a total exceeded only by the world-record 18 achieved by Emil Lang on the eastern front – see Osprey Aviation Elite 6 - Jagdgeschwader 54 ‘Grünherz'). Post-war research has failed to identify all 17 of Marseille's alleged victims. It has proved,
however, that whereas he claimed all but one (a Spitfire) as Kittyhawks, at least half were in fact Hurricanes.

Although possibly two, and maybe even as many as four, of Marseille's opponents were not actually destroyed, the victories he did amass during his three sorties east of El Alamein on that 1 September make it without doubt the most successful day of his career.

Twenty-four hours later another five claims took Oberleutnant Marseille's score to 126, which won him the Diamonds. On this occasion there was to be no immediate summons to Berlin. And by the time the award was announced on 4 September his total had already risen to 132. A further dozen kills were added in the week that followed. Then, on 15 September, the sixth of seven enemy fighters credited to Marseille (all identified as ‘P-46s', JG27's erroneous designation for the Kittyhawk) gave him his 150th. He was only the third Luftwaffe pilot to reach this figure.

Although Marseille's 150 brought no further decorations (at the time there was nothing higher than the Diamonds), it did result in his immediate promotion to Hauptmann. Still three months short of his 23rd birthday, Hans-Joachim Marseille had become the youngest Hauptmann in the Luftwaffe. He was also by far the highest scorer against the western Allies. But seven more victories were still to be added. They were claimed on 26 September, the 158th, and last of all – a Spitfire – going down near El Hamman, another halt on the coastal railway two stops to the east of El Alamein.

But Nemesis was already at hand. The two missions of 26 September had both been flown in new Bf 109G-2/trops. The first six of these machines, which were to replace the Gruppe's trusty Friedrichs, had just been delivered, and all had been allocated to Hauptmann Marseille's 3. Staffel. One of them, Gustav Wk-Nr. 14256, was to bring about the unthinkable, and something which 158 aerial opponents had signally failed to accomplish – the death of Hans-Joachim Marseille.

On 30 September Marseille was leading his Schwarm on yet another freie Jagd behind the Alamein front when his engine began to burn. Within seconds the cockpit was full of smoke. Choking on the fumes and unable to see, Marseille sought desperately to get back to the German lines guided by instructions over the R/T from his wingman, Oberleutnant Jost Schlang. Nine minutes after the fire had first broken out, the Gustav – on its first operational flight – suddenly flipped onto its back and plunged earthwards in a steep dive. Marseille managed to extricate himself, but his body slammed heavily against the tailplane. Parachute unopened, his lifeless form crashed to the desert floor near the tiny white mosque of Sidi Abd el Rahman, just to the rear of Rommel's forward minefield defences.

Geschwaderkommodore Major Eduard Neumann, who had once prophesied that he would make a fighter pilot out of the precocious young Berliner, issued an Order of the Day. It ended with these sentences;

‘His successes against our toughest aerial opponents, the English, are unique. We can be happy and proud to have counted him as one of us. There are no words eloquent enough to convey what his loss means to us. He leaves behind an obligation for us to follow his lead, both as a human being and as a soldier. His spirit will remain an example to the Geschwader for ever.'

The pilots of 3. Staffel had their own way of mourning the loss of their ‘Jochen'. They shared a fig cake and listened to his favourite tune, ‘Rumba Azul', on the wind-up gramophone.

Forty-eight hours later, whether at the instigation of a particularly understanding member of the Higher Command, or simply as a result of operational expediency, I./JG27 was offered a complete change of scenery. Staging via the heel of Italy, where it converted fully on to the Bf 109G-2/trop, the Gruppe transferred to Sicily to take part in the renewed air offensive against Malta. During its near three-week stay at Pacino, the unit had accounted for seven RAF Spitfires. But two pilots had been lost, one to unknown causes and the other crashing into the sea due to yet another engine failure.

By this time III./JG27 had moved forward from Quasaba to Turbiya, closer to the Alamein front. But the Gruppe's morale was at a low ebb.

Successes were still hard to come by, and its pilots were fed up of being treated as the Geschwader's ‘poor relations'. This had only been heightened when they were handed II./JG27's war-weary Friedrichs, which they would continue to fly while the other two Gruppen converted to the Bf 109G – although given the latter model's early accident rate, this may have been a blessing in disguise!

Knowing of his imminent promotion to the staff of XI. Fliegerkorps, and also fully aware of his Gruppe's problems, it is reported that ‘Jack' Braune had even suggested that Hans-Joachim Marseille should be appointed his successor in an attempt to inject some spirit into the unit. Whether this proposal was given serious consideration is not known. But the ‘Star of Africa' was no more. And when Hauptmann Erhard Braune departed on 11 October, his replacement was ex-Geschwader-Adjutant Hauptmann Ernst Düllberg.

One bright spot in III./JG27's sea of woes was provided by Leutnant Werner Schroer. Although not in the same league as Marseille, the Kapitän of 8. Staffel had continued to score steadily. On 20 October his 49th kill earned him the Knight's Cross. Less than 72 hours later, on the morning of 23 October, a pair of ‘P-46s' east of El Alamein took his tally to 51.

But III. Gruppe's troubles, imagined or otherwise, were to be overwhelmed by a far greater disaster which was to affect not just JG27, but the whole of the Axis forces in North Africa. For later that same evening 882 artillery pieces opened fire as one. Night turned into day. Gen Montgomery had begun the Battle of El Alamein.

I./JG27 was rushed back from Sicily, but not even this most experienced of desert Jagdgruppen could do anything to influence events on the ground now. By 3 November it had claimed its final 13 victories over Egypt, two of which had been credited to Kommandeur Hauptmann Gerhard Homuth, raising his total to 61.

The top scorers of all three Gruppen were remarkably level at this stage. A trio of P-40s downed over the battlefield on the opening morning of Montgomery's offensive had been numbers 63-65 for Hauptmann Gustav Rödel, Kommandeur of II./JG27. Further to the west, one of a pair of B-24s claimed by III. Gruppe on 4 November provided the now Oberleutnant Werner Schroer with his 60th.

4 November was the day British and Commonwealth forces broke through the Axis front at El Alamein. Rommel's great retreat had begun. By 12 November the last German and Italian troops had been chased out of Egypt. For the British the ‘Third Benghazi Stakes' were off and running. And this time it was to be a one-way race. This latest advance across Cyrenaica would not be driven back. It would continue through the Arco Philaenorum (inevitably, ‘Marble Arch' to the passing British), across Tripolitania and only end with the total surrender of all Axis forces in Tunisia.

‘Edu' Neumann's JG27 was spared this final ignominy. After retiring to fields in western Cyrenaica, and having been forced to abandon many of their machines on the way, Stab I. and III. Gruppen handed over most of their remaining Bf-109s to JG77. They were then evacuated from North Africa on 12 November.

II./JG27 was to remain nearly a month longer before it too passed its aircraft over to JG77 and finally departed. During that time, based latterly at Merduma, just across the provincial border in Tripolitania, it lost three pilots killed but claimed six Allied fighters destroyed. The last one of all, fittingly a Kittyhawk, went to a tyro of 6. Staffel (Leutnant Hans Lewes – it was his first victory) during the Gruppe's final sortie on the morning of 6 December.

Jagdgeschwader 27's 20-month African odyssey was over.

Reference: http://www.clubhyper.com/reference/jg27bookextractjw 1.htm

Biography
Hans-Joachim Marseille was born to Charlotte and Siegfried Marseille, a family with French-Huguenot ancestry in Charlottenburg-Berlin. It is thought his father Siegfried was a fighter pilot in World War I, however this is unconfirmed. What is known about Siegfried Marseille (according to the book German Fighter Ace Hans-Joachim Marseille -'The Star Of Africa') is that he was promoted to general in the Army in 1935. Other sources claim he was killed in action against Soviet Forces in the Stalingrad area in early 1943, once again this is not certain.

His mother and father divorced when Marseille was still a young child, his mother married again and took the name Reuter, which affected Marseille, although he retook the name Marseille in adulthood. His lack of discipline afforded him the reputation of a rebel, often getting himself into mischief, something that would plague him early on in his Luftwaffe career. During the Battle of Britain in 1940 Marseille served in Jagdgeschwader 52[1], where he claimed 7 kills, flying alongside the likes of Johannes Steinhoff and Gerhard Barkhorn. One Bf-109E which he had crash-landed (he had written off 4 aircraft in action) has been recovered, rebuilt, and repainted in the colours of 'White 14' in which he had flown the aircraft.

As punishment for insubordination (rumoured to be derived from his penchant for American jazz music, womanising and his overly 'playboy' lifestyle) and inability to fly as a wingman, he was transferred by Steinhoff [2] out to Jagdgeschwader 27 which was soon relocated to North Africa. He scored two more kills before being shot down by Sous. Lt Denis, a Free French pilot with 73 Squadron in a Hurricane. However, his Geschwaderkommodore Eduard Neumann soon saw potential in Marseille and encouraged him to self-train to improve his abilities. By this time, he had crashed or damaged another four Bf-109E aircraft, including a tropicalized aircraft that he was ferrying.

His Staffel was rotated to Germany in late 1941/early 1942, to convert onto the Bf-109F-4/Trop, in which Marseille became a star. Marseille created a unique self-training program for himself, both physical and tactical, which resulted not just in outstanding situational awareness, marksmanship, and confident control of the aircraft, but also in a unique attack tactic that preferred a high angle deflection shooting attack and shooting at the target's front from the side, instead of the common method of chasing an aircraft and shooting at it directly from behind.

His innovative and unique attack method, which was perfected by him to a method for attacking aircraft formations, resulted in his fantastic lethality ratio, and in rapid multiple victories per attack, and it is this talent that made him one of the greatest and most innovative fighter aces in history.

On June 6, 1942, Marseille attacked alone a formation of 16 P-40 fighters and shot down 6 aircraft of No. 5 Squadron South African Air Force, five of them in six minutes, including the aces Captain Pare (6 claims), Lieutenant Goulding (6.5 claims), and Captain Botha (5 claims). On September 1 he was even more successful, claiming 17 enemy aircraft shot down on one day, 8 of them in 10 minutes.

Marseille flew 4 different Bf-109F-4/Trop aircraft:

Werk Nummer 8693, in which his score rose to 50 on February 23, 1942,
W.Nr. 10056, with 58 victory bars on the rudder,
the well-known W.Nr. 10137, with the number '70' within an open-topped wreath and 31 victory bars on the rudder, and
his final F-4/Trop, W.Nr. 8673 with the early-F Variant rear-fuselage horizontal support bars welded along the lower rear fuselage seam joining the fin/rudder and the stabilizer/elevators to the next forward fuselage section, a black-outlined yellow 14, and, on the rudder, '100' enclosed within a wreath, atop 51 victory bars.
 

The 1995 French-American WWII drama Diamond Swords is very loosely based on Marseille's life; its main character (played by Jason Flemyng) is named Hans-Joachim Avignon.

Death
On the 30 September 1942 Hauptmann Marseille was leading his staffel on a Stuka escort mission, during which no contact with enemy fighters was made. While returning to base, his new Bf-109 G-2/trop's cockpit began to fill with smoke; blinded and half asphyxiated by the smoke, he was guided by his wingmen Jost Schlang and Pottgen back to the German lines. By the time they reached their own lines, 'Yellow 14' had lost power and was drifting lower and lower. Pottgen called out after about ten minutes that they had reached the White Mosque of Sidi Abd el Rahman, and thus had reached friendly lines. At this point Marseille deemed his aircraft no longer flyable and decided to bail out, his last words to his friends being 'I've got to get out now, I can't stand it any longer'.

His Staffel who had been flying a tight formation around him peeled away to give him the necessary room to manoeuvre, and Marseille rolled his aircraft onto its back in standard procedure for bale-out, but due to the smoke and slight disorientation he failed to notice that the aircraft had entered a shallow dive and was now travelling at a considerably faster speed (approximately 400mph). He worked his way out of the cockpit and into the rushing air only to be carried backwards by the slipstream, the left side of his chest striking the vertical stabilizer of his stricken fighter, either killing him instantly or rendering him unconscious to the point that he could not deploy his parachute. He fell almost vertically, hitting the desert floor 7 km south of Sidi Abd el Rahman. As it transpired, a gaping 30 cm hole had been made in his parachute and the canopy had spilled out, but after recovering the body, the parachute release handle was still on 'safe', revealing Marseille had not even attempted to open it.

Hans-Joachim Marseille lay in state in the Staffel sick bay. His comrades coming to pay their respects throughout the day. As a tribute to their comrade they put on the record the 'Rhumba Azul' that he enjoyed listening to so much, it played over and over again until for the rest of the day. Marseille's funeral took place on 1 October 1942 at the heroes cemetery in Derna where Generalfeldmarschall Albrecht Kesselring and Eduard Neuman delivered an emotional eulogy.

His grave bears a one-word epitaph, Undefeated.

A war-time pyramid was constructed by Italian engineers at the site of his fall but over time it decayed. In 1989 Eduard Neuman and other JG27 survivors in co-operation with the Egyptian government erected a new pyramid that stands there to this day. It is understood that after the war, Hans-Joachim Marseille's remains were brought from Derna and reinterred in the memorial gardens at Tobruk - it was there that his mother visited his grave in 1954.

Achievements
8 victories in 10 minutes, 17 victories in one day, 54 victories in one month.
Average lethality ratio of just 15 rounds per victory.
Awarded Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds, Germany's highest military honor. (one of only 27 awarded during the course of the war, ten of them to ace pilots).
Awarded Italian Gold Medal for Bravery (awarded only twice to Germans during the course of the war).
Youngest Captain in the Luftwaffe.
His 151 claims in North Africa included:
101 P-40/Tomahawk/Kittyhawks
30 Hurricanes
16 Spitfires
2 Baltimore medium bombers
1 Blenheim bomber
1 Martin Maryland bomber
Recent research has suggested that of his 151 North Africa claims, 81 can be directly attributed to Marseille via cross reference to Allied loss records, 24 can be safely rejected as no aircraft were lost or matched his combat reports, and 46 'possibles' which match to definite Allied losses shot down by German fighters, but could not definitely be attributed to Marseille or any other Luftwaffe pilot.

This discrepancy of claims to actual losses proves to be fairly typical of all WW2 combat claims for both Axis and Allied fighter aces.

The I./JG27 fighter Gruppe claimed 588 aircraft shot down April 1941 - November 1942. Marseille accounted for 151 of these; 26% of the unit's total.

Hans Joachim Marseille
The most amazing fighter pilot of World War 2
Hans Joachim Marseille, a young German fighter pilot, was the most amazing, unique, and lethal ace of World War 2. A non-conformist and brilliant innovator, he developed his own personal training program and combat tactics, and achieved amazing results, including 17 victories in one day, and an average lethality ratio of just 15 gun rounds per victory. Marseille was described by Adolf Galland, the most senior German ace, with these words : 'He was the unrivaled virtuoso among the fighter pilots of World War 2. His achievements were previously considered impossible.'

Marseille, who later became one of the ten most highly decorated German pilots of World War 2 and was nicknamed 'The Star of Africa' by the German propaganda, ('Jochen' by his friends), had a very unpromising and problematic start. At age 20 he graduated the Luftwaffe's fighter pilot school just in time to participate in the Battle Of Britain in the summer of 1940. He initially served in fighter wing 52 under Johannes Steinhoff (176 victories). In his third combat sortie he shot down a Spitfire and by the end of the Battle Of Britain he had seven victories, but he was also shot down four times, and his behavior on the ground got him into trouble. A charming person, he had such busy night life that sometimes he was too tired to be allowed to fly the next morning. He also loved American Jazz music, which was very politically incorrect in the Nazi military. As a result, he was transferred to another unit as a punishment for 'Insubordination'. His new unit, fighter wing 27, was relocated in April 1941 to the hot desert of North Africa, where he quickly achieved two more victories but was also shot down again and still had disciplinary problems.

Luckily for him, his new Wing Commander, Eduard Neumann, recognized that there might be a hidden potential in the unusual young pilot and helped him get on the right track. With his problems on the ground finally over, Marseille began to deeply analyze his combat activity, and started to improve his abilities as a fighter pilot with an intense self-training program, both physical and professional, that he developed for himself.

Marseille's self-training program
Vision - Marseille decided to adapt his eyes to the powerful desert sun and the dry desert atmosphere and to adapt his body to the desert's conditions. He stopped wearing sun glasses, deliberately exposed his eyes to the desert sun, and shifted from alcohol to milk. He also noticed that in the intensely lit dry desert atmosphere, aircraft can be detected from greater distances than over Europe and deduced that hiding and surprise are less practical over the desert than in the cloudy sky over Europe.
G-Force - Marseille worked endlessly to strengthen his abdominal and leg muscles in order to enhance his ability to sustain higher G-Force and for longer durations during dogfights better than the average fighter pilot. G-Force is the enormous centrifugal force experienced when a fighter aircraft makes sharp turns during dogfight. The modern G-suit that helps pilots sustain it was not yet invented in World War 2.
Aerobatics - Marseille used every opportunity to perform breathtaking aerobatics. In addition to free entertainment to his friends on the ground, this also gave him an outstanding control and confidence in extremely maneuvering his Messerschmitt 109 aircraft.

Marksmanship - Marseille spent his unused ammunition practicing firing at ground objects and trained a lot not just in plain strafing but also in high deflection shooting while in a sharp turn, which is much harder.

Intelligence - he began to read every possible intelligence information he could find in order to maximize his knowledge and understanding of the enemy.

Tactics - That's where Marseille marked himself as a great innovator of air warfare, and he kept improving. He claimed that in the perfect visual conditions over the desert, large formations are in a visual disadvantage against highly maneuvering single aircraft. He preferred to fight alone, with a single wingman providing warnings from a safe distance. He claimed that when fighting alone in a short range dogfight, he could quickly fire at anything he saw, while the attacked formation's pilots were confused, hesitated, and switched to a defensive position that further increased the lone attacker's chances. He also claimed that fighting alone eliminates the high risk of firing at or colliding with a wingman in such extreme maneuvering. Marseille said that in such conditions, there's a lower chance and too little time for the usual chase attack method, and preferred to use high angle deflection firing from short range while making a sharp turn. In doing so, he never used his gun sight and instead fired a very short burst at the passing target in the split second when its leading edge, its propeller, disappeared from his eyes behind his aircraft's nose. He calculated that when firing a short burst at this position, his gun rounds will hit the target's engine and cockpit, and he trained in this unorthodox aiming method on his friends (without firing) many times and perfected his ability to use it. He deduced that over the desert, a fighter pilot can become 'invisible' only by extreme maneuvers at close range, and that the intensity of the maneuvering was more important than the speed of flying.

The Hans Joachim Marseille that emerged from this self-training program was a fighter pilot with superior abilities. He saw enemy aircraft before others did and from greater distances, he could sustain higher G-Force and for longer durations, he made unbelievably sharp turns and generally achieved better performance with the Me-109 than others. He greatly outmaneuvered his enemies, nullifying the significant numerical advantage they had, often becoming 'invisible' to the enemy pilots by maneuvering so fast, and using his high-deflection short range firing method he achieved an amazing record of lethality, shooting down enemy aircraft with just 15 gun rounds on average.

The Star of Africa
He first demonstrated his new abilities on Sept. 24, 1941. During a fighter sweep, he suddenly broke formation and hurried to a direction where no one saw anything. When the formation caught up with him, he already shot down a bomber. Later the same day, his formation of six Me-109s met a formation of 16 Hurricanes. Marseille and his wingman were ordered to provide cover to the other four Me-109s which attacked the Hurricanes, but after three Hurricanes were shot down, Marseille told his wingman to cover him and attacked a formation of four Hurricanes. He dived at them, leveled at their altitude, and shot down two Hurricanes in a single burst while in a sharp turn. He then dived below the Hurricanes to gather some speed again, and then climbed back to them and shot down a third Hurricane. At that stage, the two formations disengaged each other, but Marseille climbed alone to a higher altitude and later dived at the retreating Hurricanes and shot down a 4th Hurricane, his 5th victory that day, and only then flew alone back to base. 'I believe now I got it' he said to a friend.

This was the beginning of his amazing series of dogfight victories, which lasted a year until his death in an accident. His most 'classic' combat, by some analysts, was on June 6, 1942 at noon. While in a bomber escort mission, he saw a formation of 16 P-40 Tomahawk fighter and ground attack aircraft, but initially remained with his formation, escorting the German bombers. After ten minutes, he left his formation with the escorted bombers and flew alone to attack the 16 Tomahawks, but his faithful wingman followed him. Marseille climbed above a tight formation of four, then dived at them. From a range of just 200ft he selected his first victim and turned at him. From a very short range of just 150ft he fired and shot it down. He then pulled up, turned, and dived at his 2nd victim, shooting it down from a range of 150ft. The others began to dive, but Marseille dived at them, turned at his 3rd victim and shot it down at altitude of about 3500ft (1km). He passed thru the smoke from his 3rd victim and leveled at low altitude, and then climbed again. He then dived again, at his 4th victim. He fired from just 100ft, but his guns didn't fire, so he fired his machine guns from very short range and passed thru the debris from his 4th victim. At the moment he hit his 4th victim, his 3rd victim hit the ground after falling 3500ft, approximately 15 seconds between victories, an indication of Marseille's speed. The remaining Tomahawks were now all at very low altitude. He leveled at them and quickly closed distance. He found himself beside one of the Tomahawks, he turned at him and fired, hitting his 5th victim in the engine and the cockpit. He climbed again, watched the remaining Tomahawks, selected a target, dived, levelled, and fired, and passed just above his 6th victim. He then climbed to his wingman which observed the battle from 7500ft above, and then, short of fuel and ammunition, flew back to base.

In 11 minutes of combat, fighting practically alone against a large enemy formation, he shot down six victims, five of them in the first six minutes. He was the only attacker in the battle, and not a single round was fired at him. The surviving Tomahawk pilots said in their debriefing that they were attacked 'by a numerically superior German formation which made one formation attack at them, shot down six of their friends, and disengaged'. In a post-war analysis of this dogfight these pilots testified the same.

The fatal accident
The 22 years old Hans Joachim Marseille became a star, and he kept improving with experience. On Sept. 1, 1942, a month before his death, he shot down 17 enemies in one day, including 8 victories in 10 minutes, in his 2nd sortie that day. During this month he shot down 54 enemy aircraft. Already the youngest Captain in the German Air Force, he was promoted to Major. He taught his methods to his friends, but none of them were able to match his level of achievements in using these methods.

On Sept. 26, he shot down his last victims, making a total of 158 confirmed air victories. He received a new Me-109 aircraft but refused to replace his faithful aircraft. His status was such that only an order by Fieldmarshal Kesselring, the supreme commander of the German forces in the southern front, convinced him three days later to use the new aircraft.

The next morning, Sept. 30, 1942, he flew his 382nd combat mission, a fighter sweep over British territory. They met no enemies, and turned back towards the German lines. Marseille then had a technical problem. His new aircraft's engine cooling system failed, the engine caught fire, and his cockpit was full of smoke. Encouraged by his fellows, Marseille flew his burning new Me-109 three more minutes until he was again over German held territory. He then turned his aircraft upside down, jettisoned the canopy, and then released himself and fell outside of the burning fighter. Bailing out is not always safe, and Marseille was hit in the chest by the rudder of his Me-109 and lost consciousness, so he did not open his parachute, and fell down to the ground and died.

Already highly decorated, he was posthumously awarded the highest German medal, the Knights Cross with Oak leaves, Swords, and Diamonds. Only 9 other German aces were awarded this medal. On his grave, his comrades wrote his name and rank, and added just one word: undefeated.

Hans-Joachim Marseille
By Major Robert Tate, USAF
With the Messerschmitt's left wingtip pointed vertically toward the bluish-green bay below, the hapless Hurricane fighter stands virtually motionless in front of the young Berliner's windscreen. Through the heavy metal framed canopy of the Messerschmitt Bf-109F-4, the British Hurricane with its yellow, blue, white, and red centered cockade remains clearly recognizable against the crystal blue, cloudless North African sky. Pulling back on the stick, the G forces increase and the gut-wrenching turn tightens. The German pilot's body feels as though several hundred extra pounds have been saddled around him as the high G turn presses his body firmly into his seat. From underneath his black leather and mesh flight helmet, beads of sweat roll down the German's face, burning his eyes as they remain open and fixed on the revi-optical gun sight. 3G, 3.5G, 4G. The strain increases and the young man's arm starts to weaken and grow fatigued. Tired, numb, and aching from a mission already full of air combat, there are no distractions allowed; he mustn't let his quarry get away.

A quick, cursory look inside and a firm but positive input with right rudder, Jochen, as he is known by his friends, corrects the aircraft's slight skid. Throttle full aft and maximum power, more pull on the stick and the Messerschmitt starts to gain rapidly on the brown and tan camouflaged British fighter.

 The Bf-109 begins to shudder under the ever increasing strain of the battle as the airspeed rapidly bleeds off from 300 knots indicated airspeed down to 140 knots. The tan colored Messerschmitt with the sky blue underside responds like the thoroughbred she is. Physics demands the Messerschmitt's nose to drop as the airspeed and corresponding lift falls away. Defying this law of nature, Jochen aggressively applies full top rudder with his heavy, fleece lined leather flying boot and the 109 now hangs precariously between stall and slow flight. A slight indication of stall warning and between 140 and 130 knots indicated airspeed, there is a large metallic clang that momentarily distracts the German pilot as the leading edge slats automatically slam into the extended position. This aeronautical feature increases wing camber and simultaneously decreases stall speed and decreases the British pilot's chances of survival.

Like an artist working and molding clay to create the perfect masterpiece, the 22 year old German pilot works his aircraft as an extension of his own body. Sweat pours down his back underneath his black leather flight jacket. There is a definite cold chill in the cockpit at his altitude made even more noticeable by the cool winter sun hanging high and listless in the Libyan sky. The webbed shoulder harnesses bite into his neck and stings as the sweat creeps into the raw and irritated skin. He is suddenly aware of the additional weight of the flight helmet on his head as the crushing forces of high G maneuvering continue to take hold of his thin and nearly frail body. These minor distractions however, no longer affect the German ace. He has been here before and the only thing that now matters is another victory.

Looking over his left shoulder, the RAF pilot sees the tan Messerschmitt with white wing tips perched ominously off his left hind quarter. The white propeller spinner housing the deadly 20 mm cannon and the twin 7.9 mm machine guns on the nose slowly pulling lead and setting up for the proper firing position. Fear completely grips the British pilot for he now realizes it is no rookie pilot on his tail. Every evasive maneuver attempted has been flawlessly matched and countered by the German pilot who at the same time has been able to close the distance between the two adversaries with every turn. This is definitely an expert he is fighting today! With his fate evidently sealed, the ruddy faced Englishman, paralyzed with fear, takes a final look over his left shoulder to see the Messerschmitt approaching firing position. . .

As Jochen's Messerschmitt closes in, the Hurricane begins to disappear beneath the nose of the German warbird. Young Jochen cocks his head slightly to the left and bites down on his lower lip. His large brown eyes see only the space in time where he calculates his deadly ordinance and the enemy plane will meet. It is time. FIRE!!!!

The brown leather gloved index finger closes firmly around the red firing trigger and the control column shakes violently in his right hand. The cockpit immediately fills with the acrid smell of cordite as more than thirty pounds of steel per second of 7.9 mm machine gun and 20 mm cannon shells hurtle toward the Hurricane in beautiful yellow colored tracer arcs. A quick two-second burst and the German rolls his aircraft inverted and dives down and away, certain his aim was true.

One thousand feet above the melee, the young Berliner's wingman watches the action in amazement, awe, and a certain amount of disbelief. As if by magical forces guiding Jochen's ammunition, the shells and the Hurricane meet in deadly unison. With perfect timing and precision accuracy, the bullets and cannon shells first strike the Hurricane's engine with fantastic, dazzling sparks, immediately rendering it a furnace of uncontrollable fire. Angry orange and red tongues of flame lap hungrily from the engine, belching sickening black and gray smoke extending more than 100 feet behind the stricken airplane. The damage, just beginning, gets worse as the shells quickly walk their way back along the fuselage to the cockpit. The destruction there is swift and complete, reducing the once proud British fighter pilot to a bloody, lifeless form inside the burning cockpit of his winged tomb.

'Horrido Jochen!!', exclaims his wingman. 'Victory!!'

'Hast du den aufschlag gesehen?' 'Did you see them crash?'

'Jawohl Jochen!' 'Confirmed!'

Within seconds, the 7500 pound Hurricane, a sheet of flaming metal, thunders vertically into the ocean near the Libyan harbor of Tobruk. As German fighter ace Hans-Joachim Marseille turns for home, a total of four, oily black spills are left fouling the otherwise beautiful ocean surface, marking the graves of four British fighter pilots that will be mourned by family and squadron members alike yet celebrated as four more victory marks on the rudder of German fighter ace Hans-Joachim Marseille, known throughout Germany as 'The Star of Africa,' who is to become the most successful of all German fighter pilots in the North African theater.

The morning of 30 September, 1942 was like most other late summer mornings in the North African desert, with the weather forecasted to be hot, dry and unrelenting. For the men of German fighter Gruppe I./JG-27, the anticipation of another full day of combat weighed heavily on everyone's mind. As well it should have. For the first time, Field Marshall Erwin Rommel's Afrika Korp was in a position to be thoroughly routed and thrown out of Africa by Lt. General Bernard Montgomery's British 8th Army who, under new and more aggressive leadership, had gained their second wind and rekindled their fighting spirit. Not only were the men of JG-27 fully aware of Rommel's recent defeat at the Battle of Alam el Halfa in early September, they seemed to be caught in a perpetual battle with the harsh desert climate, a severe lack of supplies, the constant strain of aerial combat, and the ever-present threat of British commando attacks against their airfields. However, as difficult as the situation appeared for the Gruppe, and despite the recent loss of two of the more experienced pilots in the unit, individual morale was extremely high. Problems affecting other fighter units in the area seemed somewhat removed from the men at this lonely desert outpost in northern Egypt.

Captain Hans-Joachim Marseille rolled out of bed on the morning of 30 September, 1942 and was greeted by Mathias, his personal batman from the Transvaal. The strain of one and a half years of almost continual aerial combat showed heavily on his young face of 22 years. Marseille, the youngest captain in the Luftwaffe, appeared to have everything going his way. He was confident, cocky, and by far the most famous and successful fighter pilot in the North African desert. After a slow start as a fighter pilot on the Channel Front during the Battle of Britain, having downed seven aircraft while losing several aircraft himself, Marseille overcame initial weaknesses as a pilot and made his Messerschmitt Bf-109 fighter, with the big yellow 14 painted on the side, the scourge of the desert air war. During the previous 29 days, he had coolly dispatched no less than 54 British, South African, and Australian fighter aircraft, 17 of those in one day. Fourteen days earlier he had been promoted to Captain and had just been notified of being the fourth man awarded Germany's highest military award: The Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords, and Diamonds. Without a doubt, young Marseille was well on his way to becoming among the first group of Luftwaffe pilots to shoot down 200 enemy aircraft.

The morning of 30 September brought the prospect of another day's hunt in the skies over Egypt. More victories and more glory bestowed upon the young man from Berlin. But this morning, a freak accident would reduce perhaps the greatest fighter pilot of the war from the hero of the German nation to a lifeless historical footnote on the floor of the North African desert.

1997 will mark the 55th anniversary of the death of Hans-Joachim Marseille, arguably the greatest of all World War II fighter pilots. With the coming of the anniversary, the debate as to just how great the young Berliner was will certainly continue to rage within historical aviation circles.

The basis of the debate stems from Marseille's actual, yet almost mythical, combat record in North Africa. He was credited with destroying 158 Allied aircraft, all but seven of those within an intense eighteen month period in the desert. All but four of his victories were against fighter aircraft, and all were against pilots of the western nations. No other pilot destroyed as many aircraft on the Western Front as did Marseille. During this same period, although shot down several times himself, Marseille escaped death from the angry guns of Allied pilots in over 388 combat missions. Twenty-nine other German pilots would go on to score more victories than Marseille, however, those pilots scored the majority of their victories against Russian opponents on the Eastern Front.

Marseille, a German of French Huguenot ancestry, was in the words of the General of the German Fighter Arm, Adolf Galland, 'The unrivaled virtuoso of fighter pilots.' His ability to sometimes destroy entire squadrons of enemy aircraft in a single sortie is the substance legends are made of, and the kind of material ripe for critics to study and either deny or defend. Marseille is still regarded by most German Luftwaffe pilots to have been the best of the best; excelling as a marksman, an acrobatic pilots, as well as one of the best combat tacticians in the Luftwaffe. Together, the synergy created by the accumulation of these talents forged one of the most lethal fighter pilots of his era.

Marseille's superb ability as a pilot was only outshined by his uncommon, gregarious, and sometimes boyish behavior on the ground. He wore his hair long, had a penchant for practical jokes, and listened to taboo music like American jazz and swing, which was often referred to as 'Jew' and 'Nigger' music. Marseille also had a fairly popular, and sometimes unpopular, reputation as being a 'playboy.' Early in his career, he was transferred from JG-52 by his commander, the famous Johannes 'Macky' Steinhoff who said, 'Marseille was remarkably handsome. He was a gifted pilot and fighter, but he was unreliable. He had girlfriends everywhere, who took up so much of his time that he was often too tired to be allowed to fly. His often irresponsible understanding of duty was the primary reason I sent him packing. But he had an irresistible charm.' He was quickly shipped off to JG-27 and upon his arrival in North Africa, his commanders were in possession of a thick file containing his breeches of military discipline and unorthodox behavior. To say Marseille was not the typical German fighter pilot or stereotypical Aryan Teutonic Knight would be a gross understatement.

'Jochen was a practical joker; he was forever playing pranks. He came to see me and my squadron - No. 8 Staffel - one day in his colorful Volkswagen jeep. He called it Otto. After a talk, a cup of sweet coffee and a glass of Italian Doppio Kümmel, he got into his jeep and drove it straight at my tent flattening everything. Then he drove off with a grin stretching across his face.'
Werner Schrör, 8/JG27, 61 Kills in N. Africa

Much of the debate and refusal to substantiate Marseille's combat record originates from one day of furious air combat on 1 September, 1942 in which he claimed to have destroyed 17 aircraft in three sorties. Not only did Marseille claim 17 aircraft, but he did it in a fashion that was unheard of at the time. His victims were shot out of the sky in such a rapid fashion that many Allied critics still refuse to believe Marseille's claims as fact. But it is precisely the speed and fury involved with these kills that has been the center of the Marseille debate for the past half century. For years, many British historians and militarists refused to admit that they had lost any aircraft that day in North Africa. Careful review of records however do show that the British did lose more than 17 aircraft that day, and in the area that Marseille operated. The British simply refused to believe, as many do today, that any German pilot was capable of such rapid destruction of RAF hardware.

Facts are that Marseille is still acknowledged as among the best marksmen in the Luftwaffe. The Germans were very meticulous in filing combat reports with all relevant data to include time of battle, area of operation, opposition encountered, as well as an in-depth armorers report. At the end of a mission, the armorers would count the number of bullets and cannon shells expended during the fight. Marseille would often average an astonishing 15 bullets required per victory, and this with a combat resulting in his downing of several allied aircraft. No other German pilot was close to Marseille in this area.

'Yeah, everybody knew nobody could cope with him. Nobody could do the same. Some of the pilots tried it like Stahlschmidt, myself, and Rödel. He, he was an artist. Marseille was an artist.' Using his hands to illustrate. 'He was up here and the rest of us were down here somewhere.'
Friedrich Körner, 36 victories, Knight's Cross winner, 2 JG-27

But what made Marseille so effective in a theater of combat where so many other pilots achieved little or no success? Several factors accounted for his success in the desert with one being attributed to his superior eyesight. Legend has it that Marseille would stare at the sun for extended  periods of time in order to acclimate his eyes to the desert glare. Marseille, like American fighter legend Chuck Yeager, had the ability to see enemy aircraft long before anyone else in his formation. Since Marseille tended to see the enemy first, he was consistently able to position himself in desirable attacking positions with many of his victims obviously succumbing to the speed and surprise of Marseille's attacks. Another critical factor for his success was his superb flying ability. Through constant practice and a desire to be the best pilot in his unit, Marseille was one of the few pilots who was able to totally master his Messerschmitt fighter through the full flight envelope. He would practice his techniques over and over again, often against men in his own squadron while returning home from sorties. He was so comfortable and confident in his flying abilities that he would often break standard rules of aerial combat  by pulling his power to idle and using flaps to help tighten his turns. He would also regularly attack numerically superior enemy formations in lightening fast strikes that used the enemy's formation size as its own disadvantage. But most critical to Marseille's success was the exploitation of his superior Messerschmitt fighter over the majority of enemy fighters deployed and encountered in the desert in concert with exposing weaknesses inherent within the standard allied fighter formations used in the desert.

The DAF (Desert Air Forces: Royal Air Force, Royal Australian Air Force, and South African Air Force) sometimes used what was called a Lufbery Circle, named after the American WW I fighter pilot who developed the formation, Raoul Lufbery. When encountered by a real or perceived superior force of enemy fighters, the DAF pilots would often form up in a defensive circle with one aircraft behind the other. This formation was much like the 2-dimensional wagon train circling in a attempt to both dissuade Indian  attack and to afford the best defensive firepower. In theory, if a German aircraft attacked a British fighter from behind, another British fighter would be in place to immediately shoot down the enemy aircraft daring to intrude into the defensive circle. Marseille, one not to be discouraged or scared away, developed tactics, unfortunately at the expense of several of his own Messerschmitt fighters early in his North African career, that enabled him to enter and then defeat the otherwise efficient DAF formations.

Starting at a point several thousand feet above the circle and displaced laterally a mile or so, Marseille would dive down below the formation and attack from underneath. There he would select one unsuspecting victim, line him up in his sights, and hammer one very short and deadly burst of cannon and machine gun fire from his aircraft. His aim was so accurate that he usually placed all of his shells from the engine back into the cockpit, often killing the pilot. After his firing run, Marseille would either slice through the top of the formation or stall the aircraft and spin down to safety. Once the full maneuver was complete, Marseille would set himself up for another run. By repeating this and variations of this deadly sequence, Marseille often shot down four, five, and six, aircraft in a single sortie. His movements were so fast that it was common for the unsuspecting allied pilots to think they were under attack by a large formation of aircraft. On 15 September, 1942, for example, Marseille destroyed 7 Australian fighter aircraft within an eleven minute period and on 17 June, 1942, Marseille destroyed six aircraft within a seven minute period. The table below illustrates the quickness of many of Marseille's multiple kills.

A Sample of Multiple Kill Sorties Achieved by Marseille

Victories  Date   Times of Victories
88  thru 91  15 Jun 42  1902, 1903, 1904, 1905 
92 thru 95  16 Jun 42  1902, 1910, 1911, 1913 
96 thru 101 17 Jun 42  1202, 1204, 1205, 1208, 1209, 1212 
105 thru 108  01 Sep 42  0828, 0830, 0833, 0839* 
109 thru 116  01 Sep 42  1055, 1056, 1058, 1059, 1101, 1102,  1103, 1105* 
117 thru 121  01 Sep 42  1846, 1847, 1848, 1849, 1853*
127 thru 132  03 Sep 42  0820, 0823, 0829, 1608, 1610, c.1611 
137 thru 140  06 Sep 42  1803, 1813, 1814, 1820 
145 thru 151  15 Sep 42  1751, 1753, 1755, 1757, 1759, 1800, 1802
152 thru 158  26 Sep 42  0910, 0913, 0915, unk, 1656, 1659, 1715
  * Indicates a total of 17 aircraft shot down on this day.

Marseille's ingenious tactics were made successful because of his unique and masterful flying abilities. Other pilots who tried to emulate Marseille, but failed to master their own aircraft, were not as successful. It is interesting to note that two of the other most successful German pilots in the desert also used Marseille's tactics to achieve many their victories. Still many Allied historians refuse to believe that Marseille was as successful and deadly as the Germans claim. Keep in mind that during the Marianas Turkey Shoot, on June 19, 1944, US Navy pilot David McCambell shot down 7 Japanese aircraft on a single sortie, and another 9 on 24 October, 1944. Major William Shomo was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for downing 7 Japanese aircraft in a single sortie on 11 January, 1945. Many pilots on both sides of the war were credited with multiple kills on single sorties. Marseille just happened to make a deadly habit of it.

'However, there is no doubt that my true schoolmaster was Marseille; I studied his tactics for attacking the British defensive circles for a long time, tried it myself often without success - and finally, learned the lesson. . . During the fights over the convoys to Tobruk, the British introduced the defensive circle. It was very efficient, but then Marseille disenchanted it; he would dive down near the circle, pull out and zoom into it from below. He reached the level of the circle just before stalling, just in time to level off, shoot down a Tommy and start to spin to sea level, where he pulled out at the last second (it was impossible to follow him). He then climbed back to his own formation and repeated the performance until the circle broke up. No other German pilot was able to copy Marseille's tricks, although all made attempts to do so, and sometimes succeeded in breaking up the circle.'
Werner Schrör,

Fighters Over the Desert, p.232

30 September, 1942. At the height of both the desert war in North Africa and the career of young 'Jochen' Marseille, tragedy was to strike the Luftwaffe such that they would never again be a serious threat in North Africa. Scheduled to fly a new Messerschmitt Bf 109G-2 fighter, W.Nr. 14256, Marseille was called upon to once again escort the now painfully obsolete Stuka dive bombers against ground targets in Egypt. At 1047, Hans-Joachim Marseille took off for his final sortie. After the escort mission was complete, Marseille and his squadron were directed to intercept a flight of enemy aircraft sighted south of Imayid, Egypt. No contact with the enemy fighters was made and the flight of Messerschmitts set a course for home.

At 1135, Marseille indicated that he had smoke pouring into his cockpit and it was becoming difficult to either breathe or see. Other members in the flight urged Marseille to remain with his aircraft for another couple minutes since they were still over enemy-held territory. By 1139, smoke in the cockpit was now unbearable and Marseille was forced to leave his airplane. Marseille's last radio transmission was, 'I've got to get out now. I can't stand it any more'. Now over German territory, at approximately 10000 feet, Marseille rolled his aircraft inverted in a standard maneuver to prepare for bailout. Suffering from probable spatial disorientation, possible toxic hypoxia, as well as being blinded by the smoke in the cockpit, Marseille's aircraft entered an inverted dive with an approximate dive angle of 70 to 80 degrees. At a speed of approximately 400 knots, Marseille jumped out of his damaged aircraft. Unfortunately, the left side of Marseille's chest struck the tail of his airplane, either killing him instantly or incapacitating him to the point where he was unable to open his parachute. As the other members of Marseille's squadron watched in horror, Jochen's body landed face down 7 km South of Sidi Abd el Rahman, an unfitting end to the 'African Eagle' and a foreshadowing of things to come for the Luftwaffe.

The men of Marseille's squadron were so devastated by his death that the entire I Gruppe ceased to function as a combat unit and was subsequently withdrawn from combat operations for a period of almost one month. Marseille was buried in the desert with full military honors in the military cemetery in Derna, Egypt. To this day, a pyramid, newly dedicated in 1989 stands as both a testimony and honor to his achievements on the site of some the most severe fighting in North Africa, El Alamein.

Marseille's career is one of the most interesting and stellar of any Second World War aviator. In 388 combat missions, 482 missions total, he destroyed 158 allied aircraft. All of these on Western Front. For the remaining skeptics, please note the following: In the North Africa campaign, some 1300 victories were claimed by German pilots. Of those, 674 victories were claimed by only 15 pilots, and the top 55 scoring pilots accounted for 1042 kills. This points out another very basic difference between German and Allied combat philosophy. While the Allies tended to hunt in packs and compete vigorously for kills, the Germans, at least in North Africa, tended to let the best pilots 'have at it' while the novices would tend to sit back and enjoy the show. This is one reason the loss of an asset like Marseille was so devastating to the Luftwaffe in Africa. That kind of emotional destruction would not likely occur in Allied squadrons.

Through complete and intense research of many of Marseille's claims in the desert, it can be argued that he may have indeed been guilty of some over claiming towards the end of his short and prolific career. Not that it was intentional but rather as matter of circumstances of the circus like environment his character brought to the unit. Everyone expected him to be successful on a daily basis and achieve more and more glory for their unit. Marseille in turn, certainly influenced by their enthusiasm, was so sure of his own abilities that he would sometimes fire at the enemy, break off the attack and seek the next victim without confirming the destruction of the previous target. A large percent of his victims did indeed crash land in the desert or limp back home as opposed to being utterly blown out of the sky. Regardless, even with the possibility of slight over claiming due to youthful bravado and a twinge of wishful thinking, a conservative estimate of over 130 definite, indisputable victories, equivalent to approximately ten percent of all aircraft claimed by Luftwaffe pilots in North Africa, is still a testament to this man's achievements.

Marseille: The Luftwaffe's master of the rapid, multiple kill. So deadly and effective in the aerial arena that more than 50 years after his death, much debate is still centered on his accomplishments. Was he the best? My personal opinion aside, it is difficult to compare combat pilots to one another. It is much like trying to compare boxers like Marciano, Ali, Liston, Lewis, and Tyson. Too many factors play a role in the fortunes of a pilot's combat career. Marseille's record however, does speak for itself. Do I think he would have survived the war had he continued to fly and fight for another two and one-half years? Possibly not. The strain of combat in the desert had already begun to take its toll on Marseille, evident in his constant smoking and sometimes uncontrollable shaking after an intense combat sortie. Marseille tended to be much too impetuous and impatient - not being the sort of man who would pace himself for the duration. Where men like top scoring ace of all time Erich Hartmann would look over a situation and then decide to attack only when he had favorable odds, the young, brazen Marseille and his wingmen would often dive into large groups of enemy aircraft regardless of the advantage the enemy may have enjoyed. It is possible Marseille would have met a fate similar to countless other Luftwaffe 'Experten' in the skies over Germany, combating the scores of Allied bomber and fighter aircraft that roamed over fortress Europe between 1943-1945. Regardless of the speculation about Marseille and his achievements, the study of WW II combat aviation would not be complete without a look at this young Berliner's contribution to this arena and trying to understand the attributes and influences he brought to the airmen in the North African desert.

'When Marseille came to JG-27 he brought a very bad military reputation with him, and he was not at all a sympathetic fellow. He tried to show off, and considered his acquaintance with a lot of movie stars to be of great importance.

In Africa, he became ambitious in a good way, and completely changed his character. After some time there, it became a matter of some importance to movie stars to know him.

He was too fast and too mercurial to be a good leader and teacher, but his pilots adored him. He thanked them by protecting them and bringing them home safely.

He was a mixture of the fresh air of Berlin and French champagne-a gentleman.'
Eduard Neumann, Kommodore JG-27
Horrido, p.116

Marseille Facts

Born: 13 December, 1919 in, Berlin- Charlottenburg, Germany
Died: 30 September, 1942 near Sidi Abd el Rahman, Egypt

Kills: 158 154 Fighter aircraft and  4 Bomber aircraft
Awards:
- Iron Cross 2nd Class - September 1940
- Iron Cross 1st Class - Fall 1940
- German Cross in Gold - 24 November, 1941
- Knight's Cross - 22 February, 1942
- Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves - 6 June, 1942
- Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords - 18 June, 1942
- Italian Medaglia d' Oro for bravery - 6 August, 1942
- Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords, and Diamonds
  3 September, 1942

Promotions:
Leutnant - 1 July, 1941
Oberleutnant - April, 1942
Hauptmann - 3 September, 1942

The views expressed by Major Tate are his own and do not necessarily reflect those of the United States Air Force. Major Tate can be contacted on the Internet at: rtate@worldnet.att.net
Picture Credits:
luft0340.jpg Author's HJM Collection
luft0338.jpg Scanned from Ring And Shores Fighters Over The Desert
luft0341.jpg Author's HJM Collection
luft0345.jpg John Crandall's The Star Of Africa
luft0339.jpg German Fighter Aces HJM
luft0343.jpg German Fighter Aces HJM

I wish to thank Major Tate for his fine contribution to the Luftwaffe Resource Page.
Scott Rose



Heinrich Bartels

Heinrich Bartels was born on 13 July 1918 at Linz in Austria. From early summer 1941, Bartels served with Ergänzungsstaffel/JG26 on the Channel front. He recorded his first victory on 19 August, when he shot down a RAF Spitfire fighter. He claimed a second Spitfire shot down on 27 August.

Bartels was transferred to 11./JG1 on 27 January 1942. On 10 March, 11./JG1 was redesignated 8./JG5. Bartels was to become one of the most successful pilots of 8./JG5. This unit was under the command of Hauptmann Hermann Segatz (40 victories, DK-G) and was based on the Northern or Polar front. Bartels recorded 47 Russian aircraft shot down in 100 missions in this theatre, including 21 victories in September alone.

On 13 November 1942 he was awarded the Ritterkreuz for 46 victories. In the spring of 1943, Bartels was transferred to JG27 based in the Mediterranean theatre. Oberfeldwebel Bartels was assigned to 11./JG27. He had 49 victories to his credit at this time. Bartels gained 14 victories in October 1943, including three USAAF P-38 twin-engine fighters shot down on 8 October (54-56) and five victories, including a further three P-38s, shot down on 25 October (57-61). By the end of 1943, Bartels score stood at 73, including four victories on 15 November (67-70), all P-38 fighters shot down on one mission over Greece. Bartels operated on Reichsverteidigung duties in April and May 1944. He claimed 12 victories, including three victories in a day on two occasions, before deploying to the Invasion front.

Here, in five missions, he recorded 11 victories. For these achievements, Bartels was nominated for the Eichenlaub. By 23 December 1944, Bartels' victory count had increased to 98. At this time he was serving with 15./JG27 formed on 12 June 1944. On 23 December, he took off at 11:00 with his flight. His wingman was Oberfähnrich Rolf Brand. Gaining altitude they flew to the Köln – Bonn area. Over Bonn, at 7500 metres, they saw fuel tanks dropping in front of their noses. Those drop tanks came from P-47 fighters of the USAAF 56th Fighter Group 'Red Noses' in pursuit of the aircraft flown by Heinz Rossinger (3 v.). Bartels promptly shot down one of the American fighters on Rossinger's tail. It was his 99th and last victory. Heinrich Bartels failed to return. 24 years later, on 26 January 1968, Bartels' Bf 109G-10 (W.Nr. 130359) Yellow 13 was found at Villip near Bad Godesberg. In the cockpit was the intact parachute...

Heinrich Bartels flew about 500 combat missions and shot down 99 enemy aircraft: 49 on the Eastern
front with JG5 and 50 with JG27 in the Mediterranean and in defence of Germany. His score included
nine P-47s eleven P-51s and fourteen P-38s!

Asisbiz database list of aerial victories for Heinrich Bartels

No Date Time Enemy A/C Type Unit Location / Comments
1. 19.8.1941   Spitfire Erg./JG26  
2. 27.8.1941   Spitfire Erg./JG26  
? 24.1.1942   8./JG5 MiG-3  
? 5.11.1942 1055 8./JG5 LaGG-3 36 Ost/2928
3. - 49. 1942   47 victories 8./JG5 21 victories in September 1942
50. 1.10.1943   Boston 11./JG27 NW Kos
51. 1.10.1943   Boston 11./JG27 NW Kos
52. 5.10.1943 12:23 B-24 11./JG27 Marikon
53. 5.10.1943 12:33 B-24 11./JG27 Petralona
54. 8.10.1943 13:15 P-38 11./JG27 20km S Levahdia
55. 8.10.1943 13:52 P-38 11./JG27 1km SW Kap Vourlas
56. 8.10.1943 13:55 P-38 11./JG27 5km W Kap Velanida
57. 23.10.1943 13:11 Spitfire 11./JG27 SSW Podgorica
58. 25.10.1943 13:17 Whitley 11./JG27 S Bar
59. 25.10.1943 13:20 P-38 11./JG27 S Bar
60. 25.10.1943 13:22 P-38 11./JG27 S Bar
61. 25.10.1943   P-38 11./JG27 N Kap Rodonit
62. 31.10.1943 15:15 P-38 11./JG27 Kap Rodonit
63. 31.10.1943 15:20 P-38 11./JG27 SW Kap Rodonit
64. 2.11.1943 13:47 Spitfire 11./JG27 WSW Skutari
65. 2.11.1943   Spitfire 11./JG27 WSW Skutari
66. 4.11.1943 16:25 Boston 11./JG27 W Durazzo
67. 15.11.1943 13:10 P-38 11./JG27 SE Kalamaki
68. 15.11.1943 13:10 P-38 11./JG27 SE Kalamaki
69. 15.11.1943 13:11 P-38 11./JG27 SE Kalamaki
70. 15.11.1943 13:12 P-38 11./JG27 SE Kalamaki
71. 17.11.1943 12:50 B-25 11./JG27 NE Kalamaki
72. 17.11.1943 12:52 B-25 11./JG27 NE Kalamaki
73. 17.11.1943 12:58 P-38 11./JG27 E Marathon
74. 11.4.1944 16:32 P-38 11./JG27 20 km NW Graz
75. 23.4.1944 8:20 Spitfire 11./JG27 10 km SW Cilli
76. 23.4.1944 8:22 Spitfire 11./JG27 15 km SW Cilli
77. 23.4.1944 8:23 Spitfire 11./JG27 20 km SW Cilli
78. 24.4.1944 13:45 P-51 11./JG27 10 km W Muhldorf
79. 24.4.1944 13:47 P-51 11./JG27 10 km W Muhldorf
80. 24.4.1944   P-51 11./JG27 N Waldkraiburg
81. 28.4.1944 10:38 P-51 11./JG27 15 km NE Laibach
82. 28.4.1944 10:39 P-51 11./JG27 15 km NE Laibach
83. 19.5.1944 13:25 P-47 11./JG27 15 km SW Quenstedt
84. 19.5.1944 13:27 P-47 11./JG27 Quedlinburg
85. 19.5.1944 13:30 P-51 11./JG27 S Aschersleben
86. 14.6.1944 7:28 P-47 11./JG27 Argentan
87. 14.6.1944 7:29 P-47 11./JG27 Falaise
88. 14.6.1944 7:30 P-47 11./JG27 Argentan
89. 14.6.1944 8:05 P-47 11./JG27 15 km SW Paris
90. 16.6.1944 20:47 P-47 11./JG27 W Dives-sur-Mer
91. 16.6.1944 20:48 P-47 11./JG27 Dives-sur-Mer
92. 22.6.1944 14:10 Spitfire 11./JG27 WSW Caen
93. 22.6.1944 14:17 P-51 11./JG27 10 km SW Caen
94. 24.6.1944 15:05 P-51 11./JG27 S Flers
95. 24.6.1944 15:08 P-51 11./JG27 10 km SW Flers
96. 25.6.1944 9:05 P-38 11./JG27 15 km SE Blois
97. 8.12.1944 9:50 P-51 15./JG27 NW Achmer
98. 18.12.1944 13:48 P-51 15./JG27 Eifelraum
99. 23.12.1944   P-47 15./JG27 near Bad Godesberg

Victories : 99
Awards : Ehrenpokal (5 October 1942)
Deutsches Kreuz in Gold (20 October 1942)
Ritterkreuz (13 November 1942)
Units : Erg./JG26, JG1, JG5, JG27
http://www.luftwaffe.cz/bartels.html

Asisbiz Database of 99 aerial victories for Heinrich Bartels

Date Name Unit A/c Type Height Time Comments
19-Aug-41 Heinrich Bartels 1.Erg.JG26 Spitfire      
27-Aug-41 Heinrich Bartels 1.Erg.JG26 Spitfire 1400m    
29-Jul-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-61 4000m 10.15 N Murmansk
29-Jul-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-61 4000m 10.16 N Murmansk
05-Aug-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-40 Warhawk 3000m 12.40 S Schonginji
05-Aug-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-40 Warhawk 3500m 12.45 S Murmaschi
10-Aug-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 Hurricane 500m 18.50 20 854
10-Aug-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 Hurricane 400m 18.55 20 882
10-Aug-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 Hurricane 200m 19.05 20 884
11-Aug-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 Hurricane 600m 20.20 20 342
13-Aug-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-40 Warhawk 3700m 15.20 30 773
13-Aug-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-153 3500m 15.06 30 784
13-Aug-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-40 Warhawk 3500m 15.15 30 783
02-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-39 Aircobra 4500m 11.15 36 Ost 3913
02-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-180 4000m 11.20 36 Ost 3072
02-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-40 Warhawk 3500m 11.25 36 Ost 2927
05-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-61 3500m 08.40 36 Ost 3912
05-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 Hurricane 4500m 08.25 36 Ost 3077
05-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-61 4500m 08.30 36 Ost 3079
08-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-40 Warhawk 3500m 15.08 36 Ost 2928
08-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-40 Warhawk 3500m 15.09 36 Ost 2927
08-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-39 Aircobra 5000m 11.35 36 Ost 2995
09-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-39 Aircobra 3500m 10.35 36 Ost 3912
11-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-61 3500m 15.35 37 Ost 3079
11-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-61 3000m 15.37 37 Ost 3081
11-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-180 3500m 15.30 37 Ost 3077
22-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 Hurricane 3000m 12.08 SE Murmansk
22-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-61 1000m 15.12 2km NE Murmaschi
22-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 Hurricane 3000m 12.13 NNE Murmansk
22-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 Hurricane 3000m 12.07 E Murmansk
22-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-61 1500m 15.21 7km SE Murmaschi
22-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 Hurricane 3000m 12.15 NNE Murmansk
29-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-180 1800m 12.55 2km ostw Murmansk
29-Sep-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-180 1300m 12.56 2km ostw Murmansk
20-Oct-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-61 2300m 13.25 37 Ost/3077
20-Oct-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 I-61 1500m 13.28 37 Ost/3079
29-Oct-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 LaGG-3 2500m 13.45 37 Ost 3078
29-Oct-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 LaGG-3 2500m 13.55 36 Ost 3921
29-Oct-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 LaGG-3 3000m 13.56 36 Ost 3925
05-Nov-42 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 LaGG-3 300m 10.55 36 Ost/2928
23-Mar-43 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-39 Aircobra 2000m 14.15 29 270
23-Mar-43 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-40 Warhawk 2000m 14.18 39 150
23-Mar-43 Heinrich Bartels 8./JG5 P-40 Warhawk 2000m 14.20 29 250
01-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 A-20 Boston     NW of Kos
01-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 A-20 Boston     NW of Kos
05-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 B-24 Liberator 5000m 12.23 Marikon (Salonika)
05-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 B-24 Liberator 5000m 12.33 Petralona
08-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 800m 13.50 20km South of Lebadeia
08-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 40m 13.52 1km SW Kap Vourlas
08-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning   13.15 South Akrotiri Vourlias
08-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 10m 13.55 5km W Kap Velanida
23-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 Spitfire 2000m 13.11 SSW FlPl Podgorica
25-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning     North of Kap Rodonit
25-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 500m 13.22 South of Bar (Montenegro)
25-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 800m 13.20 South of Bar (Montenegro)
25-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 Whitley V 1500m 13.17 South of Bar (Montenegro)
31-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38F Lightning 50m 15.20 SW Kap Rodonit
31-Oct-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38F Lightning 400m 15.15 Kap Rodonit
02-Nov-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 Spitfire     WSW Scutari
02-Nov-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 Spitfire 900m 13.47 WSW Scutari
04-Nov-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 Spitfire 200m 16.25 West of Durazzo
15-Nov-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 3500m 13.12 SE Kalamaki
15-Nov-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 3500m 13.11 SE Kalamaki
15-Nov-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 4000m 13.10 SE Kalamaki
15-Nov-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 4000m 13.10 SE Kalamaki
17-Nov-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 B-25 Mitchell 4000m 12.50 NE Kalamaki
17-Nov-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 B-25 Mitchell 4000m 12.52 NE Kalamaki
17-Nov-43 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 2000m 12.58 E Marathon
11-Apr-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 500m 16.32 20-25km NW Graz
23-Apr-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 Brit. Flgz. 2500m 08.23 10-20km SW Cilli
23-Apr-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 Spitfire 2500m 08.20 10-15km SW Cilli
23-Apr-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 Brit. Flgz. 2500m 08.22 10km SW Cilli
24-Apr-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-51 Mustang     North of Waldkraiburg
24-Apr-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-51 Mustang 4500m 13.45 10km W Muhldorf
24-Apr-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-51 Mustang 5000m 13.47 10km W Muhldorf
28-Apr-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-51 Mustang 400m 10.38 15km NE Laibach
28-Apr-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-51 Mustang 300m 10.39 15km NE Laibach
19-May-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-51 Mustang   13.30 South of Aschersleben
19-May-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt   13.25 15km S Quenstedt (S Aschersleben)
19-May-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt   13.27 Quedlingburg
14-Jun-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 200m 08.05 15km SW Paris
14-Jun-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 5000m 07.28 Raum Argentan
14-Jun-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 4500m 07.20 Raum Falaise
14-Jun-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt   07.30 Raum Argentan
16-Jun-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt   20.48 Dives-sur-Mer
16-Jun-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 5000m 20.47 West of Dives-sur-Mer
22-Jun-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 Spitfire 800m 14.10 SW Caen
22-Jun-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-51 Mustang 1000m 14.17 10km SW Caen
24-Jun-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-51 Mustang 2300m 15.05 South of Flers
24-Jun-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-51 Mustang 2000m 15.08 5-10km SW Flers
25-Jun-44 Heinrich Bartels 11./JG27 P-38 Lightning 400m 09.05 04 Ost N/FC 9 (SE Blois)
08-Dec-44 Heinrich Bartels 15./JG27 P-51 Mustang 600m 09.50 NW Achmer
18-Dec-44 Heinrich Bartels Stab IV./JG27 P-51 Mustang 450-500m 13.48 PN (Bullingen)



Eberhard Bock

Units: 3./JG3 (5/40), Stfkpt 3./JG3 (9/40), Stfkpt 6./JG1 (2/42), 2./JG104 (2/44), Stfkpt 5./JG27 (5/44)

Awards: DK-G(8/21/42), EP, EK 1 & 2, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109F-2 WNr 5477 'Yellow 3' (lost 6/24/41; MIA, returned), Bf 109E-7 WNr4131 in Staffel(75% dam, 12/40), Fw 190A in JG-1, Bf 109G-6 WNr441324 'Black 6' (lost in JG-27)

Remarks: KIA 28 May, 1944 during aerial combat with P-51's near Helmstedt. Bailed safely but struck the tail and was killed. On 2 December, 1940, forced to make a belly landing at Cadzand in #4131 after running out of fuel. Another force landing with minor injuries behind Russian lines on 24 June, 1942 in Bf 109F2 Wk# 5477 'Yellow 3' after Russian flak hit his oil line. Returned safely. A 3rd force landing at Vassilkov airfield 10 August, 1941 in F-2 #6818 after aerial combat with Soviets in the Kiev area. Assigned to JG-104 after the death of his brother. Three bomber victories, a B-17 and two B-24's, while in JG-104. One known victory, his 1st, a Morane 406 southeast of Charleroi, 15 May, 1940. His 2nd, a Morane 406 15 km southeast of Amiens, 26 May, 1940. His 3rd, a Blenheim at St. Valery/Abbeville, 6 June, 1940. Partial credit with Walter Binder, on an unidentified seaplane at Loiremündung, 21 June, 1940. His 1st victory in the S.U., his 9th, an I-153 on 22 June, 1941. Victories 22 & 23 were Hampdens 10 km west of Katwijk-aan-Zee on 12 February, 1942. His 27th & 28th, a B-17 and a B-17 (HSS) at Merzhauzen on 12 May, 1944. Magnus.

Asisbiz database list of 17 aerial victories for Eberhard Bock

Date Name Unit A/c Type Height Time Comments
Wednesday, May 15, 1940 Eberhard Bock 3./JG3 Morane 406   13:15 SE Charleroi
Sunday, May 26, 1940 Eberhard Bock 3./JG3 Morane 406   09:31 15km SE Amiens
Thursday, June 06, 1940 Eberhard Bock 3./JG3 Blenheim     St Valery-Abbeville
Friday, June 07, 1940 Eberhard Bock 3./JG3 Hurricane     Abbeville
Friday, June 21, 1940 Eberhard Bock 3./JG3 Float-plane     Loire Estuary
Monday, September 02, 1940 Eberhard Bock 3./JG3 Morane     sudEast of London
Thursday, September 05, 1940 Eberhard Bock 3./JG3 Hurricane     Raum London
Monday, September 09, 1940 Eberhard Bock 3./JG3 Morane      
Monday, September 09, 1940 Eberhard Bock 3./JG3 Morane      
Sunday, June 22, 1941 Eberhard Bock 3./JG3 I-153      
Thursday, February 12, 1942 Eberhard Bock 6./JG1 Hampden   17:37 Sea 7km W Katwijk-aan-Zee
Thursday, February 12, 1942 Eberhard Bock 6./JG1 Hampden   17:39 Sea 10km W Katwijk-aan-Zee
Tuesday, August 17, 1943 Eberhard Bock 2./JG104 B-17 Fortress 4000m 12:45 4km SE Hanau
Tuesday, February 22, 1944 Eberhard Bock 2./JG104 B-24 Liberator 6000m 13:07 Obertraubling (Bayern)
Friday, February 25, 1944 Eberhard Bock 2./JG104 B-24 Liberator 6000m 12:57 3km W Hienheim
Friday, May 12, 1944 Eberhard Bock 5./JG27 B-17 Fortress Hss 6000m 12:28 vor Merzhausen
Friday, May 12, 1944 Eberhard Bock 5./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6000m 12:25 FlPl Merzhauzen

USAAF mission 376 mission brief 28th May 1944.

Mission 376: 1,341 bombers and 697 fighters are dispatched to hit oil targets in Germany; 32 bombers and 9 fighters are lost; they claim 64-30-31 Luftwaffe aircraft:

1. 610 B-17s are dispatched against an oil targets at Ruhland/Schwarz-Heide (38 bomb) and aircraft factory at Dessau (12 bomb); secondary targets are aviation factories at Zwickau (15 bomb) and Leipzig (28 bomb); 14 bomber hit Bohlen, 15 hit Meissen, 19 hit Brandis/Polenz Wusten-Sachsen Airfield, 12 hit Frankfurt marshalling yard, 32 hit Ubigau, 20 hit Dessau, 4 hit Frankfurt, 5 hit Camburg and 22 hit targets of opportunity; they claim 20-21-18 Luftwaffe aircraft; 17 B-17s are lost, 1 is damaged beyond repair and 107 damaged; 3 airmen are KIA, 15 WIA and 155 MIA.

2. 255 B-17s are dispatched to an oil dump at Konigsburg/Magdeburg (105 bomb) and oil industry at Magdeburg/Rothensee (55 bomb); 17 hit Dessau and 6 bomb the marshalling yard at Gera; they claim 16-8-6 Luftwaffe aircraft; 9 B-17s are lost and 64 damaged; 3 airmen are KIA, 2 WIA and 90 MIA.

3. 106 B-24s are dispatched to Lutzkendorf/Halle (66 bomb); 10 hit Wetzlar and 6 hit a target of opportunity; 3 B-24s are lost and 16 damaged; 1 airman is WIA and 3 MIA.

4. 311 B-24s are dispatched to oil targets at Merseburg/Leuna (63 bomb) and Zeitz-Troglitz (187 bomb); 10 hit Limburg, 8 hit Memmingen, 9 hit Saalfeld and 10 hit targets of opportunity; they claim 1-0-0 Luftwaffe aircraft; 3 B-24s are lost and 23 damaged; 1airman is KIA, 1 WIA and 26 MIA.

5. 58 of 59 B-17s hit Cologne/Eifeltor marshalling yard without loss; glide bombs are used but the weapon proves unsuccessful. Escort is provided by 182 P-38s, 208 P-47s and 307 P-51s; no P-38s are lost; P-47s claim 2-0-1 Luftwaffe aircraft in the air and 0-0-1 on the ground with the loss of 4 P-47s (pilots are MIA), 2 damaged beyond repair and 3 damaged; P-51s claim 25-1-5 Luftwaffe aircraft with the loss of 5 (pilots are MIA), 1 damaged beyond repair and 8 damaged. 527 9AF fighters also fly escort and claim 33-0-10 Luftwaffe aircraft in the air and 5-0-7 on the ground for the loss of 5 fighters.

The 10 USAAF 8AF P-51 Mustang Losses

42-103004 P-51C 363FG380FS Code:A9-A shot down by fighters crashed in Schackensleben Germany Feodor Clemovitz POW MACR-5136
42-106481 P-51B 363FG382FS Code:C3-? Lost when shot down by fighters crashed in Bennstedt Germany Curry P. Wilson POW May 28 1944 MACR-5134
42-106486 P-51B 363FG382FS Code:C3-A Lost when saddly it collided with a P-47 42-26016 and crashed in Sichau Germany Anthony E. Ladas KIA May 28 1944 MACR-5138
42-106635 P-51B 352FG486FS Bluenosed Bastards of Bodney Code:PZ-A Name:'Texas Bluebonnet - artwork, map of Texas' Pilot:Capt. Woodrow W Anderson Nickname:Clyde' Lost in this a/c when shot down by fighters probably crashed in Achersleben Germany May 28 1944 - KIA. MACR-5099.
42-106712 P-51B 354FG353FS Fighting Cobra's Code:FT-L Name:'Ho Tei II' aircraft flown by an ace Pilot:Donald McDowell but was lost due to mechanical troubles ditched North Sea. 1 KIA MACR-5133
42-106846 P-51B 4FG334FS The Eagles Code:QP-H lost when ran out of fuel crashed Aumont France May 28 1944 - Lt. Richard L Bopp POW MACR-5726
43-6631 P-51B 355FG354FS Strafers Code:WR-T lost May 28 1944 when shot down by fighters probably crashed in Zerbst Germany Lt. Clarence R Barger KIA. MACR-5360.
43-6933 P-51B 4FG334FS The Eagles Code:QP-Y Pilot:Lt. Aubrey E Hewatt lost in this a/c when shot down by fighters and crashed in Vogelsang Germany May 28 1944 -POW MACR-5397
43-6983 P-51B 355FG354FS Strafers Code:WR-O Pilot:Lt. Walter M Christensen Jr. lost in this a/c when he was shot down by fighters and crashed in Buhlendorf Germany May 28 1944 - KIA. MACR-5202
43-7195 P-51B 354FG353FS Fighting Cobra's Code:FT-X Pilot: Glenn H. Pipes became a POW when his plane was hit by flak and belly landed in Ruppersdorf Germany May 28 1944 MACR-5137

The 4 USAAF 8AF P-47 Thunderbolt Losses

42-26016 P-47D22 78FG83FS Duxford - Eagles Code:HL-A lost saddly when collided with P-51B 42-106486 and crashed in Jeggau Germany May 28 1944 - Capt. Alwin M Juchheim Jr. POW MACR-5280.
42-26064 P-47D22 78FG82FS Duxford - Eagles Code:MX-Y lost when shot down by flak crashed in Gildehaus Germany May 28 1944 - Lt. Philip H Hazelett KIA. MACR-5028.
42-76318 P-47D15 78FG82FS Duxford - Eagles Code:MX-W Lost when shot down by flak and crashed near Osnabrück Denmark May 28 1944 - Lt. William S Orvis Jr. KIA. MACR-5026. One source has the location as Elbergen Germany.
42-75457 P-47D11 353FG351FS Slybirds - Bill's Buzz Boys Code:YJ-A Lost when shot down by flak and crashed in Loddenheide Germany May 28 1944 - Lt. Joseph R Farley KIA. MACR-5027

The 33 USAAF 8AF Bomber Losses

42-31389 B-17G Fortress 100BG351BS The Bloody Hundredth Code:EP-J Name:'Lucious Lucy' shot down by fighters and crashed Barleben Germany 7 POW 3 KIA. MACR-5382 Lucius Lacy Claude Schindler Lost Magdeburg/Gera May 28, 1944
42-107028 B-17G Fortress 303BG358BS Hell's Angles Code:VK-I shot down by flak and crashed Albrechtshain, Germany 3 POW 7 KIA May 28, 1944. MACR-5340.
42-39878 B-17G Fortress 305BG365BS Can Do Code:XK-S Lost due to mechanical troubles belly-landed in Zerf Germany 8POW 2EVD May 28, 1944
42-31757 B-17G Fortress 351BG508BS Code:YB-G Name:'Round Trip' missions flown:23 Assigned to the 351BG:Feb. 25, 1944 lasted flown by the group:May 28, 1944. A/C History:Mar. 29 1944 landed at (Deenethorpe). Pilot:Lt. Howard R. Evans May 28 1944 shot down by fighters and crashed Waldau Germany 3 POW 6 KIA Pilot:Lt. William J. Condon who was KIA. Targer Dessau
42-31721 B-17G Fortress 351BG510BS Code:TU-S Name:'Black Magic' missions flown:36 Assigned to the 351BG:Jan. 29, 1944 lasted flown by the group:May 28, 1944. A/C History:Feb. 20 1944 landed at Glatton. Pilot:Lt. William R. Raser. May 28 1944 shot down by fighters. Pilot:Lt. Clyde Mclelland. Target:Dessau Another source shot down by flak and crashed Mernes Germany 8 POW 1 KIA May 28 1944.
42-39987 B-17G Fortress 351BG511BS Code:DS-D Name:'Pin Ball' missions flown:29 Assigned to the 351BG:Jan. 30, 1944 lasted flown by the group:May 28, 1944. A/C History:May 28 1944 shot down by fighters and crashed Lonnewitz Germany 6 POW 4 KIA Pilot:Lt. Robert E. L. Probasco POW. Target:Dessau
42-97191 B-17G Fortress 351BG511BS Code:DS-X Name:'Silver Ball' missions flown:17 Assigned to the 351BG:Mar. 25, 1944 lasted flown by the group:May 28, 1944. A/C History:shot down by fighters and crashed between Deetz and Neditz Germany 8 POW 2 KIA May 28, 1944 on mission to Dessau. MACR-5326 Pilot:Lt. Carl F. Miller. Target:Dessau
42-97472 B-17G Fortress 351BG511BS Code:DS-H missions flown:23 Assigned to the 351BG:Feb. 25, 1944 lasted flown by the group:May 28, 1944. A/C History:May 28 1944 shot down by fighters and crashed in Westdorf near Aschersleben Germany 9 POW Pilot:Lt. Charles F. Anderson. Target:Dessau
42-97847 B-17G Fortress 385BG549BS Van's Valiants Code:XA-Q Name:'Hunter' Shot down by flak and crashed Albrechtshain Germany May 28, 1944 10 POW. MACR-5265
42-102485 B-17G Fortress 388BG562BS Fortress For Freedom Code:Square-H crashed in Groenekan, Holland May 28, 1944. 3 KIA, 7 POW
42-39845 B-17G Fortress 388BG563BS Fortress For Freedom Code:B Lost May 28, 1944, on a mission to Magdeburg when hit by flak and lost two engines and belly-landed near Mengsberg. 10POW MACR-5317. Pilot Lt. M.G. Fjelsted, Copilot Lt. C.W. Hudson, Navigator Lt. H.J. Houlihan, Bombenschütze Lt. C. Tracewski, Funker S/Sgt. J.R. Shatz, MG Schütze S/Sgt. S.E. Mc Bien, MG Schütze Sgt. G.F. Hoover, MG Schütze Sgt. S.L. Perry, MG Schütze Sgt. L.G. Brown, MG Schütze E.S. Stringer
42-110074 B-24J Liberator 389BG567BS The Sky Scorpions Code:HP-P Lost due to mechanical troubles crashed west of Gravelines France 1 POW 3 KIA 3 MIA 2 RTD May 28 1944 MACR-5387
42-102440 B-17G Fortress 390BG568BS Wittan's Wallopers Code:BI-K Name:'Silver Slipper Previous A/C History:Commissioned 4 Mar 44. Cheyenne Mod Center 6 Mar 45. MacDill 20 Mar 44. Kearney 27 Mar 44. Presque Isle 1 Apr 44. Dow Field 4 Apr 44. 8AF 5 Apr 44. MIA Magdeburg 28 May 44. Shot down by fighters. crashed near Burg Germany 10 POW MACR-5254
42-31985 B-17G Fortress 390BG570BS Wittan's Wallopers Code:DI-P Name:'Devil's Aces' Previous A/C History:Commissioned 10 Jan 44. Cheyenne Mod Center 13 Jan 44. Great Falls 14 Jan 44. Kearney 28 Jan 44. Presque Isle 22 Feb 44. Grenier 20 Feb 44. 8AF 20 Feb 44. Lyle D. Stufflebeam WIA 18 Apr 44 at Berlin. Robert V. Lewis WIA 8 May 44 at Laon-Athies. shot down by fighters and crashed Lostau Germany 5 KIA 2 MIA 3 Pow Magdeburg 28 May 44. Shot down by fighters. Part of Vertical stabilizer Shot away. Crashed at Ebendorf. Cosgrove, Buntin, Czyz POW, rest KIA.
42-32089 B-17G Fortress 390BG570BS Wittan's Wallopers Code:DI-W Name:'Mountaineer' Previous A/C History:Commissioned 13 Jan 44. Cheyenne Mod Center 16 Jan 44. Great Falls 18 Jan 44. Grand Isle 28 Jan 44. 8AF 9 Feb 44. MIA Magdeburg 28 May 44. Shot down by fighters. Nr. 1 engine cowling Shot off. crashed near Holzhausen. All POW. shot down by fighters and crashed Colbitz Germany 10 POW
42-31651 B-17G Fortress 390BG571BS Wittan's Wallopers Code:FC-G Name:'Decatur Deb' Previous A/C History:Commissioned 27 Nov 43. Cheyenne Mod Center 30 Nov 43. Gowen Field 5 Dec 43. Salt Lake City 6 Dec 43. Rock Springs 7 Dec 43. Laramie 9 Dec 43. Cheyenne 12 Dec 43. Kearney 17 Dec 43. Romulus 6 Jan 44. Presque Isle 8 Jan 44. 8AF 12 Jan 44. James Matney WIA 20 Apr 44 at La Glacerie. Louis G. Mathews, navigator on cre 70, slightly wounded at Le Culot, Frankce on 27 Apr 44. MIA Magdeburg 28 May 44. Shot down by fighters. Fire in cockpit and part of vertical stabilizer Shot away. Wnet down in a spin and crashed Ebendorf near Magdeburg 3 POW 7 KIA. Milenock, Bolton, Stoy POW, rest KIA.
42-37806 B-17G Fortress 390BG571BS Wittan's Wallopers Code:FC-Z Previous A/C History:Commissioned 25 Apr 44. Dallas Mod Center 25 Apr 44. Kearney 2 Jun 44. Grenier 17 Jun 44. 8AF 19 Jun 44. MIA Merseburg 7 Jul 44. Prop wash caused collision over Zuider Zee with 42-107070. Both planes exploded. Outman, Coffey, Clarence Brown, Grove POW, Arthur Brown evaded, returned. Rest KIA. Another source has this aircraft shot down by fighters and crashed Walternienburg Germany 9 POW 1 KIA May 28th 1944
42-31034 B-17G Fortress 401BG612BS Code:SC-G Name:'Bonnie Donnie' Lost when shot down by fighters and crashed between Otterwisch and Pomssen Germany 7 POW 3 KIA May 28, 1944. MACR-5309 Previously Base:Gore Field, Great Falls Field, MT crashed near Pueblo Field, CO USA Pilot:Sweet, Phillip Date:Sep 10, 1943
42-39837 B-17G Fortress 401BG612BS Code:SC-L Name:'Red's Rogues' Mechanical troubles ditched North Sea 10 RTD May 28, 1944
42-31557 B-17G Fortress 401BG613BS Code:IN-R Lost when shot down by fighters and crashed 8 km South East of Belzig Germany 6 POW 4 KIA May 28, 1944. MACR-5308
42-102580 B-17G Fortress 401BG613BS Code:IN-Q shot down by fighters and crashed between Aken and Dessau Germany 5 POW 5 KIA May 28 1944 Target:Dessau MACR-5307
42-102581 B-17G Fortress 401BG613BS Code:IN-L Name:'Lonesome Polecat' shot down by fighters and crashed Glienicke Germany 6 POW 4 KIA May 28, 1944
42-102647 B-17G Fortress 401BG613BS Code:IN-M, then later IY-G and was shot down by fighters and crashed Niemegk Germany 5 POW 5 KIA May 28, 1944. MACR-5305
42-97073 B-17G Fortress 401BG615BS Code:IY-N Lost when shot down by fighters and crashed Muhro Germany 2 POW 8 KIA May 28, 1944. MACR-5311
42-50346 B-24H Liberator 445BG703BS Code:RN-? Lost when shot down by flak and crashed Stossen Germany 9 POW 1 KIA May 28, 1944. MACR-5302
42-110045 B-24J Liberator 44BG506BS The Flying Eightballs Name:'The Banana Barge' Code:GJ-K shot down by flak and crashed Dummerlohausen Germany 9 POW May 28, 1944. MACR-5353
42-97067 B-17G Fortress 457BG748BS The Fireball Outfit Code:RUW-067 Code:Y Name:'Black Puff Polly/Georgia Peach' shot down by fighters and flak crashed Osterholz Germany 9 POW 1 KIA 05/28/1944 Dessau
42-31520 B-17G Fortress 457BG751BS The Fireball Outfit Code:MJA-520 Code:A Lost May 28 1944 on a mission to Dessau I/A when shot down by fighters and crashed near Fulda - Dollbach Germany 9 POW MACR-5300
42-97452 B-17G Fortress 457BG751BS The Fireball Outfit Code:MJA-452 Code:L Failed to Return when shot down by fighters and crashed North Sea 9 MIA May 28, 1944 Dessau - Ditched in Channel. MACR-5296
41-29384 B-24H Liberator 466BG787BS The Flying Deck Code:6L-R Name:'Polaris, The Heavenly Body'
42-50345 B-24H Liberator 486BG832BS Bats out of Hell Code:3R-B assigned on:05/23/44 last operated by 486BG on:05/28/44 4 Replaced #496 was shot down by flak crashed in the English Channel, off Zuydcoote, France 3 POW 7 MIA (MACR:5389)
42-52764 B-24H Liberator 486BG833BS Wyverns/Pathfinders Code:4N-O assigned on:05/08/44 last operated by 486BG on:05/28/44 4 shot down by flak crashed in Charly des Bois Belgium 5 POW 5 EVD (MACR:5390)
42-52651 B-24H Liberator 487BG838BS Code:4F-R Name:'Starduster' Lost when shot down by flak May 28 1944, became a straggler on return was abandoned by crew and crashed 1 km W of Xhoris, 21 km S. or Liege, Belgium 6 POW 4 EVD. Target:Lutzkendorf MACR-5223. In original deployment - was presented to Pete Riegel's crew at Alamogordo. Purchased with War Bonds by the people of Franklin County, MO & approved by Gen. Arnold & others.



Arnulf Gottschall

Awards: EK 1 & 2, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109G6

Remarks: One known victory, his 1st, a B-17 8 km SW of Quackerbrück on 29 November, 1943.

Asisbiz Database of 1 aerial victories for Arnulf Gottschall

Date Name Unit A/c Type Height Time Comments
29th Nov 1943 Arnulf Gottschall 5./JG27 B-17 Fortress 8000m 15.17 8km SW Quakenbruck



Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch

Wilhelm Kientsch was born on 12 May 1921 at Kisslegg in Wurttemberg. Kientsch was posted to the Erganzungs-Staffel/ JG27 on 27 May 1941 for operational training. At the beginning of 1942, Oberfahnrich Kientsch was transferred to the Stabsstaffel of II./JG27 based in North Africa. He gained his first two victories on 18 March when he shot down two RAF P-40 fighters. By late June 1942, by which time Kientsch was serving with 5./JG27, he had eight victories to his credit and, by the end of 1942, he had increased his score to 16. On 1 June 1943, Kientsch was appointed Staffelkapitan of 6./JG27. He was particularly successful over Sicily and southern Italy in the spring and summer of 1943 claiming 25 victories, including his 20th victory, a USAAF P-38 twin-engined fighter on 16 April, one of eight he was to claim during his Mediterranean theatre service. Also included in his victories were nine four-engined bombers.

He claimed his 30th victory on 6 June, another P-38 near Pantelleria, and his 40th victory on 17 July, a USAAF B-24 fourengined bomber near Salerno. In August 1943, 6./JG27 was relocated to bases in Germany to engage in Reichsverteidigung duties. Leutnant Kientsch was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 22 November for 44 victories. On 20 December, he claimed his 50th victory when he shot down a B-24 bomber near Bremen. Kientsch was killed in Bf 109G-6 (WNr 440073) "Yellow 3" when he became disorientated in cloud during aerial combat and crashed into the ground near Wurrisch/Hunsruck in Germany on 29 January 1944. Kientsch was posthumously awarded the Eichenlaub (Nr 527) on 20 July.

'Willy' Kientsch was credited with 53 victories. All his victories were recorded over the Western front. Included in his total are 20 four-engined bombers.

List of 55 aerial victories for Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location - Comments
1. 18.3.1942 8:20 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 15km SW Ain-el-Gazala
2. 18.3.1942 8:40 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 10km SE Tobruk
3. 7.4.1942 15:45 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 S Ain-el-Gazala / Kittyhawk of 450 Sqn RAF
4. 23.5.1942 9:40 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 10km NE Ras-el-Tin / Hurricane of 33 Sqn RAF
5. 23.5.1942 9:55 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 3km NE Ain-el-Gazala / Hurricane of 33 Sqn RAF
6. 4.6.1942 8:20 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 10km SW Mteifel Chebir / Tomahawk of 4 Sqn SAAF
7. 9.6.1942 19:05 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 NE Bir Hacheim
8. 17.6.1942 10:25 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 E Sidi Rezegh
9. 21.7.1942 18:20 Hurricane 5./JG 27 SE El Alamein
10. 20.10.1942 11:40 P-40 5./JG 27 SE Bir el Abd
11. 21.10.1942 8:50 P-40 5./JG 27 SE El Daba / Hurricane of 213 Sqn, RAF flown by P/O WH Stephenson
12. 23.10.1942 7:55 P-40 5./JG 27 NE El Alamein
13. 24.10.1942 16:40 P-40 5./JG 27 SE El Alamein
14. 26.10.1942 6:40 P-40 5./JG 27 SW El Alamein / Kittyhawk of 3 Sqn, SAAF flown by F/Sgt Bullwinkel, baled out
15. 18.11.1942 9:20 P-40 5./JG 27 ENE Sidi Ahmed el Magrun / Hurricane of 33 Sqn, RAF flown by S/L Mannix
16. 27.11.1942 15:25 Spitfire 5./JG 27 15km SW Agedabia / Spitfire of 1 Sqn, SAAF flown by Capt Breidenkamp
17. 5.4.1943 12:50 P-38 6./JG 27 35km W Maréttimo
18. 13.4.1943 13:30 B-17 6./JG 27 10km N Trapani
19. 16.4.1943 16:45 P-38 6./JG 27 30km NNW Maréttimo
20. 16.4.1943 16:55 P-38 6./JG 27 60km NW Maréttimo
21. 29.4.1943 11:35 P-38 6./JG 27 25km W Maréttimo
22. 30.4.1943 10:30 Spitfire 6./JG 27 30km SE Kelibia
23. 9.5.1943 13:45 B-17 6./JG 27 WNW Trapani
24. 21.5.1943 11:20 B-17 6./JG 27 SSW Granitola Torreta
25. 22.5.1943 16:00 B-17 6./JG 27 SW Maréttimo
26. 25.5.1943 11:30 B-17 6./JG 27 NW Maréttimo
27. 28.5.1943 18:10 P-38 6./JG 27 SSW Granitola Torreta
28. 28.5.1943 18:13 P-38 6./JG 27 SSW Granitola Torreta
29. 9.6.1943 14:02 P-38 6./JG 27 N Pantelleria
30. 9.6.1943 14:10 P-38 6./JG 27 20km S Pantelleria
31. 10.6.1943 12:28 Spitfire 6./JG 27 20km NW Pantelleria
32. 10.6.1943 12:32 Spitfire 6./JG 27 20km WSW Pantelleria
33. 15.6.1943 8:40 B-25 6./JG 27 30km SW Maréttimo
34. 15.6.1943 8:45 P-38 6./JG 27 40km S Maréttimo
35. 15.6.1943 10:15 Spitfire 6./JG 27 1km N Maréttimo
36. 2.7.1943 11:30 B-24 6./JG 27 20km SW Gallipolo
37. 10.7.1943 16:05 Spitfire 6./JG 27 15km E Syracusa
38. 13.7.1943 15:35 Spitfire 6./JG 27 20km SW Syracusa
39. 16.7.1943 13:10 B-24 6./JG 27 5km NE Molfetta
40. 17.7.1943 14:10 B-24 6./JG 27 30km SW Salerno
41. 19.7.1943 11:00 B-24 6./JG 27 100km S Spartivento
42. 6.9.1943 10:53 B-17 6./JG 27 SE Schorndorf
43. 6.9.1943 11:00 B-17 6./JG 27 SSW Böblingen
44. 4.10.1943 11:42 B-17 6./JG 27 Valmy
45. 26.11.1943 13:30 B-17 6./JG 27 Duurswoude
46. 26.11.1943 13:35 B-24 6./JG 27 SE Leeuwarden
47. 1.12.1943 12:20 B-17 6./JG 27 Bonn
48. 19.12.1943 12:32 B-17 HSS 6./JG 27 80km SSE Innsbruck
49. 19.12.1943 12:35 B-17 HSS 6./JG 27 80km SSE Innsbruck
50. 20.12.1943 12:05 B-24 6./JG 27 NW Bremen
51. 5.1.1944 11:30 P-47 6./JG 27 Hagen-Bergisch Gladbach-Prüm
52. 7.1.1944 12:20 B-17 6./JG 27 Neunkirchen
53. 11.1.1944 12:12 B-24 6./JG 27 E Assen

Victories : 53
Awards : Knight`s Cross with Oak Leaves
Units : JG27
http://www.luftwaffe.cz/kientsch.html

Asisbiz Database of 55 aerial victories for Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch

Date Name Unit A/c Type Height Time Comments
18-Mar-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 2000m 08.20 15km SW Ain-el-Gazala
18-Mar-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 2000m 08.40 20km SW Tobruk
07-Apr-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   15.45 South of Ain-el-Gazala
23-May-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 5000m 09.40 10km NE Ras-el-Tin
23-May-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.55 3km NE Ain-el-Gazala
04-Jun-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.20 10km SW Mteifel Chebir
09-Jun-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   19.05 NE Bir Hacheim
17-Jun-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.25 East of Sidi-Rezegh
21-Jul-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 5./JG27 Hurricane II   18.20 SE El-Alamein
20-Oct-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 5./JG27 Curtiss P-46   11.40 SW Bir-el-Abd
21-Oct-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.50 sudEast of El-Daba
23-Oct-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.55 NW El-Alamein
24-Oct-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.40 S El-Alamein
26-Oct-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   06.40 SW El-Alamein
18-Nov-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 20m 07.20 ENE Sidi Ahmed-el-Magrun
27-Nov-42 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 5./JG27 Spitfire 2500m 15.25 15km SW Agedabia
05-Apr-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-38 Lightning 1000m 12.50 35km W Insel Marettimo
13-Apr-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17F 5000m 13.30 10km N Trapani
16-Apr-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-38F Lightning 4000m 16.55 60km NW Insel Marettimo
16-Apr-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-38F Lightning 5500m 16.45 30km NNW Insel Marettimo
29-Apr-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-38F Lightning 500m 11.35 25-30km W Marettimo
30-Apr-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 Spitfire 2800m 10.30 25-30km SE Kelibia
09-May-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress 4500m 13.45 80km WNW Trapani
21-May-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17F 6000m 11.20 SSW Granitola Toretta
22-May-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17F 7000m 16.00 20km SW Marettimo
25-May-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17F 3000m 11.30 20km NNW Ustica
28-May-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-38 Lightning 1000m 18.10 50km SW Granitola Torretta
28-May-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-38 Lightning 20m 18.13 20km NW Pantellaria
09-Jun-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-38F Lightning 2000m 14.02 Nordostecke Pantalleria
09-Jun-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-38F Lightning 50m 14.10 20km S Pantalleria
10-Jun-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 Spitfire 4500m 12.28 10km NW Pantellaria
10-Jun-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 Spitfire 3000m 12.32 20km WSW Pantellaria
15-Jun-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-38F Lightning   08.45 40km S Marettimo
15-Jun-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 Spitfire   10.15 1km N Marettimo
15-Jun-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-25 Mitchell 4000m 08.40 30km SW Marettimo
02-Jul-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-24 Liberator 7000m 11.30 20km SW Gallipoli
10-Jul-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 Spitfire 1000m 16.05 15km E Syracuse
13-Jul-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 Spitfire 5700m 15.35 20km SW Syracuse
16-Jul-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-24D Liberator 4500m 13.10 5km NE Molfetta
17-Jul-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-24D Liberator 6500m 14.10 30km SW Salereno
19-Jul-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-24D Liberator 4-2000m 11.00 100km S Cap Spartivento
06-Sep-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress   11.00 SSWBoblingen SWStuttgart
06-Sep-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress   10.53 SESchorndorf E Stuttgart
04-Oct-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress   11.42 Valmy
26-Nov-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-24 Liberator 6000m 13.10 Raum Leeuwarden
26-Nov-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress 7500m 13.30 DN-8
01-Dec-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-24 Liberator 4000m 12.30 Raum Bonn
01-Dec-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress 8000m 12.10 Raum Bonn
19-Dec-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress Hss   12.35 80km ssE Innsbruck
19-Dec-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress Hss   12.32 80km ssE Innsbruck
20-Dec-43 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-24 Liberator 8000m 12.05 NW Bremen
05-Jan-44 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt      
07-Jan-44 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress   12.20 Neunkirchen 15km NESaarbrucken
11-Jan-44 Wilhelm 'Willy' Kientsch 6./JG27 B-24 Liberator   12.12 E Assen



Antonius 'Anton' Wöffen

Units: 5./JG-27 (5/43 as a Fw), Acting Kdr II./JG-27 (1/45), Stffüh 6./JG-27 (3/45)

Awards: EK 1 & 2, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109G (Trop) in Staffel, Bf 109G-10 (Yellow 24' (lost)

Remarks: POW 11 March, 1945 after being hit in the radiator by light AA fire, while attacking a light observation AC. He belly landed his 'Yellow 24' W of Rheinberg, near Wesel, and was quickly captured by the Americans. Flugbuch (9/40 to 8/41). One known Desert victory, a P-38 50 km northwest of Marettimo on 10 May, 1943. His 2nd, a P-38 east of Marettimo Sicily on 22 May, 1943. His 3rd victory, also in Sicily, a B-24D 10 km southwest of Altamura on 16 July, 1943. His 4th, a Tempest W of Osnabrück on 2 March, 1945. His 5th, an Auster at Xanten on 11 March, 1945.

Asisbiz Database of 5 aerial victories for Anton Woffen

Date Name Unit A/c Type Height Time Comments
10-May-43 Anton Woffen 5./JG27 P-38 Lightning 6000m 14.00 50km NW Marettimo
22-May-43 Anton Woffen 5./JG27 P-38 Lightning 20m 16.20 E. Marettimo 20m
16-Jul-43 Anton Woffen 5./JG27 B-24D Liberator 6000m 13.18 10km SW Altamura
02-Mar-45 Anton Woffen 6./JG27 Tempest   07.51 W. Osnabruck
11-Mar-45 Anton Woffen 6./JG27 Auster   15.25 Xanten



Ludwig 'Zirkus' Franzisket

Ludwig 'Zirkus' Franzisket was born on 26 June 1917 at Düsseldorf. Fähnrich Franzisket was serving with JG26 in 1938. On 1 August 1939, he transferred to 1./JG1. He participated in the invasion of Poland and the Low Countries and France. On 11 May 1940, Franzisket claimed his first two victories. He ended the French campaign with nine victories to his credit, including two French LeO 451 twin-engine bombers shot down near Nesle on one mission and a French Morane fighter shot down near Roye on a later mission to record his 7th through 9th victories on 5 June. On 9 July, 1./JG1 was redesignated 7./JG27.

On 1 October 1940, Franzisket was transferred as Adjutant of I./JG27. In spring 1941, I./JG27 was relocated to North Africa. Franzisket had 14 victories to his credit at this time. On 14 June, Franzisket intercepted a lone RAF Maryland twin-engine bomber escorted by a Hurricane fighter. He shot down both aircraft. The Hurricane was piloted by South African ace, Captain Ken Driver (10 destroyed and 1 damaged victories) of 1Sqn, SAAF, who baled out to become a prisoner of war.

Oberleutnant Franzisket was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 23 July for 22 victories in 204 missions. Franzisket was appointed Staffelkapitän of 1./JG27 on 6 December 1941. On 25 December, Franzisket was wounded when his Bf-109 F-4trop was damaged by flak 40km south of Agedabia. On 11 April 1942 he shot down a P-40 to raise his victory total to 30. On 29 October 1942, Franzisket was shot down in aerial combat with RAF Spitfire fighters. He baled out of his stricken Bf-109 G-2trop (W.Nr. 10616) but struck the tailplane breaking a leg. When I./JG27 was withdrawn from North Africa at the end of 1942, Franzisket had 39 victories to his credit. From 1 July 1943, Franzisket led 1./Ergänzungs-Jagdgruppe Süd. He attended a fighter leader's course from 15 July before being appointed Gruppenkommandeur of I./JG27 based in Germany performing Reichsverteidigung duties.

On 14 October, he claimed two USAAF B-17 four-engine bombers from the formations raiding Schweinfurt. On 12 May 1944, in aerial combat with four-engine bombers over Bad Orb, Franzisket's Bf-109 G-6/U4 (W.Nr. 441097) was hit by return fire and he was badly wounded. He successfully baled out of his stricken aircraft despite his wounds.

Following his recovery, Franzisket led the fighter leaders' courses at Königsberg in Neumark from 1 October 1944. He was able to shoot down two USAAF B-17 four-engine bombers on 6 October. On 15 December 1944, Franzisket joined the Geschwaderstab of JG27. He was appointed Kommodore of JG27 on 30 December 1944. Franzisket died on 23 November 1988 at Münster. ‘Zirkus' Franzisket was credited with 43 victories in over 500 missions. He recorded all his victories over the Western front. Included in his victory total are four four-engined bombers.

List of aerial victories for Ludwig Franzisket

No Date Time Enemy A/C Type Unit Location Comments
1 11.5.1940 6:53 Gladiator 1./JG1 Near Maastricht Gladiator of 1/I/2 of Armee de l'Air Belge flown by Sgt Denis Rolin, baled out
2 11.5.1940 19:55 Morane 1./JG1 Riemst  
3 17.5.1940 13:05 Potez 63 1./JG1 Laon  
4 19.5.1940 13:50 Mureaux 1./JG1 Amiens  
5 23.5.1940 14:12 Hurricane 1./JG1 Douai  
6 23.5.1940 14:20 Hurricane 1./JG1 Douai  
7 5.6.1940 10:45 LeO 451 1./JG1 Nesle  
8 5.6.1940 10:50 LeO 451 1./JG1 Nesle  
9 5.6.1940 21:22 Morane 1./JG1 Roye  
10 11.7.1940 9:03 Hurricane 7./JG27 S Portland Spitfire (L1069) of 609Sqn, RAF flown by F/Lt PH Barran, killed
11 8.8.1940 13:25 Hurricane 7./JG27 S Isle of Wight  
12 16.8.1940 14:20 Hurricane 7./JG27 Portsmouth  
13 25.8.1940 18:55 Hurricane 7./JG27 Portland  
14 8.9.1940 13:42 Blenheim 7./JG27 Calais  
15 23.4.1941 10:40 Hurricane Stab I./JG27 Tobruk Hurricane of 73Sqn, RAF
16 23.4.1941 11:05 Hurricane Stab I./JG27 Tobruk Hurricane of 73Sqn, RAF
17 14.6.1941 5:05 Hurricane 3./JG27 S Ain el Gazala Hurricane (V7818) of 1Sqn, SAAF flown by Capt KW Driver (10/0/1 victories), baled out, POW
18 14.6.1941 5:06 Martin 167 3./JG27 SE Ain el Gazala Maryland of 24Sqn, SAAF
19 15.6.1941 16:30 Hurricane 3./JG27 SE Gambut Hurricane of 274Sqn, RAF
20 26.6.1941 13:45 P-40 3./JG27 Ain el Gazala Tomahawk of 250Sqn, RAF
21 30.6.1941 16:35 P-40 3./JG27 N Marsa Luccech Hurricane of 73Sqn, RAF flown by P/O JFC Kent
22 19.7.1941 18:15 P-40 3./JG27 N Ras Asaz  
23 9.9.1941 17:15 Hurricane 3./JG27 30km E Sidi Barrani Hurricane of 33Sqn, RAF
24 12.10.1941 8:08 P-40 3./JG27 Bir Sheferzen Tomahawk of 1 or 2Sqn, SAAF
25 17.12.1941 11:12 P-40 1./JG27 Martuba  
26 17.12.1941 11:20 P-40 1./JG27 SE Tmimi  
27 23.12.1941 12:24 Maryland 1./JG27 NE Agedabia Maryland of 12 or 21Sqn, SAAF
28 21.3.1942 7:55 P-40 1./JG27 N Ain el Gazala Kittyhawk of 94Sqn, RAF flown by P/O RH Mackillop
29 27.3.1942 16:55 P-40 1./JG27 S Ain el Gazala Hurricane of 80Sqn, RAF
30 11.4.1942 10:55 P-40 1./JG27 20km NE Bir Habex Tomahawk of 4Sqn, RAAF
31 22.5.1942 7:41 P-40 1./JG27 20km E Derna Kittyhawk of 112 or 250Sqn, RAF
- 22.5.1942   P-40 1./JG27 Near Martuba Not confirmed
32 9.6.1942 7:50 P-40 1./JG27 SW Hagfa el Beda Tomahawk of 4 or 5Sqn, SAAF
33 12.6.1942 18:50 Hurricane 1./JG27 El Adem  
34 26.6.1942 12:12 P-40 1./JG27 SW Mersa Matruh  
35 27.6.1942 8:55 Martin 167 1./JG27 SW El Daba Baltimore of 223Sqn, RAF
36 27.6.1942 18:25 Hurricane 1./JG27 SW Fuka  
37 5.7.1942 13:50 Spitfire 1./JG27 20km S El Alamein Spitfire V of 145Sqn, RAF
38 17.7.1942 13:12 Hurricane 1./JG27 SW El Alamein Hurricane of 92 or 238Sqn, RAF
39 12.10.1942   Spitfire 1./JG27 La Valetta, Malta Spitfire of 229Sqn, RAF
40 14.10.1943 14:50 B-17 Stab I./JG27 10km E Schweinfurt  
41 14.10.1943 14:55 B-17 Stab I./JG27 20km SE Schweinfurt  
? 14.10.1943 15:02 B-17 Stab I./JG27 15km WSW Rothenburg  
42 6.10.1944   B-17 ?    
43 6.10.1944   B-17 ?    

Victories : 43
Awards : Ehrenpokal (20 October 1940)
Deutsches Kreuz in Gold (12 January 1943)
Ritterkreuz (23 July 1941)
Units : JG1, JG27
http://www.luftwaffe.cz/franzisket.html

Asisbiz database list of aerial victories for Ludwig Franzisket

Date Name Unit A/c Type Height Time Comments
11-May-40 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG1 Gladiator   06.53 Raum Maastricht
11-May-40 Ludwig Franzisket 3./JG1 Morane   19.55 Riemst
17-May-40 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG1 Potez 63   13.05 Laon
17-May-40 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG1 Potez 63   13.05 Laon
19-May-40 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG1 Mureaux   13.50 Amiens
19-May-40 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG1 Mureaux   13.50 Amiens
23-May-40 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG1 Hurricane   14.20 Douai
23-May-40 Ludwig Franzisket 3./JG1 Hurricane   14.12 Douai
05-Jun-40 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG1 LeO 451   10.45 Nesle
05-Jun-40 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG1 Morane 406   21.22 Roye
05-Jun-40 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG1 LeO 451   10.50 Nesle
11-Jul-40 Ludwig Franzisket 7./JG27 Hurricane   09.03 South of Portland
08-Aug-40 Ludwig Franzisket 7./JG27 Hurricane   13.25 South of Isle of Wight
16-Aug-40 Ludwig Franzisket 7./JG27 Hurricane   14.20 Portsmouth
25-Aug-40 Ludwig Franzisket 7./JG27 Hurricane   18.55 Portland
08-Sep-40 Ludwig Franzisket 7./JG27 Blenheim   13.42 Calais
23-Apr-41 Ludwig Franzisket Stab I./JG27 Hurricane   11.05 Tobruk
23-Apr-41 Ludwig Franzisket Stab I./JG27 Hurricane   10.40 Tobruk
14-Jun-41 Ludwig Franzisket 3./JG27 Martin 167   05.06 SE Ain-el-Gazala
14-Jun-41 Ludwig Franzisket 3./JG27 Hurricane   05.05 S Ain-el-Gazala
15-Jun-41 Ludwig Franzisket 3./JG27 Hurricane   16.30 SE Gambut
26-Jun-41 Ludwig Franzisket 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.45 Ain-el-Gazala
30-Jun-41 Ludwig Franzisket 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.35 North of Marsa Luccech
19-Jul-41 Ludwig Franzisket 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.15 North of Ras Asaz
09-Sep-41 Ludwig Franzisket Stab I./JG27 Hurricane   17.15 30km E Sidi Barrani
12-Oct-41 Ludwig Franzisket 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.00 Bir Sheferzan
17-Dec-41 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.20 SE Tmimi
17-Dec-41 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.12 Martuba
23-Dec-41 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 Maryland   12.24 NE Agebadia
21-Mar-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.55 N Ain-el-Gazala
27-Mar-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.55 South of Ain-el-Gazala
11-Apr-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.55 20km NE Bir Habex
22-May-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.41 20km E Derna
09-Jun-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 P-40 Kittyhawk   07.50 SW Hagfa-el-Beda
12-Jun-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 Hurricane II   18.50 El Adem
26-Jun-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.12 SW Marsa Matruh
27-Jun-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 Martin 167   08.55 SW El Daba
27-Jun-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 Hurricane   18.25 SW of Fuka
05-Jul-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 Spitfire   13.50 20km S El-Alamein
17-Jul-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 Hurricane II   13.12 SW El-Alamein
12-Oct-42 Ludwig Franzisket 1./JG27 Spitfire     La Valetta
14-Oct-43 Ludwig Franzisket Stab I./JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 14.55 20km SE Schweinfurt
14-Oct-43 Ludwig Franzisket Stab I./JG27 B-17 Fortress   15.02 20km WSW Rothenburg



Emil Josef Clade

Place of birth Hambach, Neustadt an der Weinstra?e
Allegiance Nazi Germany
Service/branch Luftwaffe
Years of service 1936 - 1945
Rank Hauptmann
Unit JG27
Commands I./JG27
Battles/wars Battle of France
Mediterranean Theatre
Operation Bodenplatte

Emil Josef Clade (born February 26, 1916 in Hambach, now part of Neustadt an der Weinstra?e in Rheinland-Pfalz) was a Luftwaffe fighter ace in World War II, and figured in German civilian aviation after the war.

Originally trained to become a merchant, he first came in touch with aviation in 1934, became a glider pilot, and participated in the German national civilian aviator's competition before joining the Luftwaffe in April 1937. Initially certified to fly the Junkers Ju 52 transporter-bomber, he quickly moved to become a fighter pilot instead.

Contents
1 Luftwaffe Ace in World War II
2 Life after the war
3 Awards
4 References

Luftwaffe Ace in World War II
Clade was with 1./JG1 when he scored his first kill on the early morning of May 11, 1940 near Maastricht, Belgium against a Belgian Air Force Gloster Gladiator biplane. On the evening of the same day, he prevailed over a French LeO 451 twin-engine bomber, also in the Maastricht area. At this time he was already flying a Messerschmitt Bf 109 which should remain his type aircraft throughout the war.

In March 1941, Clade was made an instructor attached to Jagdgeschwader 27 into which JG1./1 had meanwhile been merged, and stayed with this fighter unit for essentially all his remaining wartime career.

Clade was assigned to the Mediterranean theatre with 5./JG27 from bases in North Africa when on August 7, 1942 (still as a Oberfeldwebel, a non-commissioned officer) he indirectly made a potentially decisive impact on the future course of the African campaign, although he was most likely unaware of the fact at the time. He was airborne over the desert south of Alexandria in Egypt when he chanced upon a Bristol Bombay transport of No. 216 Squadron RAF which was taking Lt. Gen. W.H.E. Gott, the newly appointed Commander of the British 8th Army, to a staff meeting in Cairo. Clade's attack forced the transport to crash-land, and the subsequent strafing run by another fighter from the squadron killed Gott and most other British troops inside the wreckage on the ground. (In March 2005, the 89-year old Clade and the British pilot would have an emotional meeting in Bonn, compare their accounts of the incident, and then take to the skies together.) Gott's replacement commander for the 8th Army was Bernard Law Montgomery.

Still posted in Egypt, Clade recorded his 10th air kill in on July 5, 1942 when he shot down a RAF Spitfire fighter near El-Daba. An officer (Leutnant, lieutenant) meanwhile, and with 17 air victories to his credit, Clade was appointed Staffelkapitan (squadron commander) of 7./JG27 on May 23, 1943. From 1944 onward he piloted a Me 109 G/R-9 ('White 9'). In February 1945, Oberleutnant Clade was appointed acting Gruppenkommandeur (wing commander) of III./JG27. The war was over for Hauptmann (Captain) Clade when he and his squadron comrade Major Peter Werfft disbanded the remainders of their unit near Saalbach between May 3 and May 8, 1945, and became U.S. prisoners of war.

Clade was himself shot down six times, including aerial combat occasions on October 5, 1943 (during a mission resulting in his 18th victory), on November 26, 1944, and on February 25, 1945 (immediately after his 27th air kill - the last one). He also sustained severe injuries in a Resistance attack on February 16, 1944 when he was posted in France near Avignon. In his memoirs he emphasized how lucky he had actually been to survive all this tumultous events.

Life after the war
According to his own representation, Clade survived on various minor jobs after his release. He applied to become a civilian pilot with the newly re-emerged Lufthansa in 1956 but was turned down because he exceeded the age limit by two years. However, he continued as a private aviator, was successful in various German competitions, and helped setting up local aviation associations.

Emil Clade celebrated his 90th birthday in 2006, and appears to be still alive.

Awards
German Cross in Gold
Iron Cross 1st Class

Asisbiz Database of 25 aerial victories for Emil Josef Clade

Date Name Unit A/c Type Height Time Comments
11-May-40 Josef-Emil Clade 1./JG1 LeO 45   19.50 West of Maastricht
11-May-40 Josef-Emil Clade 1./JG1 Gladiator   07.01 Maastricht
17-May-40 Josef-Emil Clade 1./JG1 Morane   12.58 Compiegne
26-May-40 Josef-Emil Clade 1./JG1 Spitfire   09.45 Raum Calais
25-Aug-40 Josef-Emil Clade 7./JG27 Spitfire   18.42 West of Portland
06-Sep-40 Josef-Emil Clade 9./JG27 Spitfire   10.03 Kenley
12-Jun-42 Josef-Emil Clade 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.20 South of El Adem
16-Jun-42 Josef-Emil Clade 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 4400m 16.42 Bu-Ahmed
26-Jun-42 Josef-Emil Clade 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 20m 14.50 35km SW Marsa Matruh
05-Jul-42 Josef-Emil Clade 5./JG27 Spitfire   13.55 40km SE El-Daba
19-Jul-42 Josef-Emil Clade 5./JG27 Hurricane II   09.18 Bir Ibrahim
03-Aug-42 Josef-Emil Clade 5./JG27 Spitfire   18.05 North of El-Bahrein
02-Sep-42 Josef-Emil Clade 5./JG27 Spitfire   17.05 SSW El-Hammam
11-Nov-42 Josef-Emil Clade 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 2000m 09.12 15km ssE Sollum
03-Mar-43 Josef-Emil Clade 5./JG27 Spitfire 5000m 08.48 20km S Ragusa
11-May-43 Josef-Emil Clade 4./JG27 P-38 Lightning 3000m 12.14 15km W Marsala
13-May-43 Josef-Emil Clade 5./JG27 P-38 Lightning 8000m   35km SW Cagliari
05-Oct-43 Josef-Emil Clade 7./JG27 B-24 Liberator 5300m 12.43 20km NW Lebadeia
08-Nov-43 Josef-Emil Clade 7./JG27 Beaufighter 400m 10.35 10km S Syphonos
13-Nov-43 Josef-Emil Clade 7./JG27 Beaufighter 20m 08.55 N N Levita
16-Nov-43 Josef-Emil Clade 7./JG27 Beaufighter 30m 12.35 NNW Insel Kos
20-Dec-43 Josef-Emil Clade 7./JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 12.45 NNE Megara
29-Jan-45 Josef-Emil Clade 12./JG27 Typhoon   16.22 Wallenbruck
22-Feb-45 Josef-Emil Clade 12./JG27 B-26 Marauder   15.10 Warendorf
25-Feb-45 Josef-Emil Clade 12./JG27 P-38 Lightning   08.35 Much

References:
Clade, Emil. Gluck gehabt. Ein deutscher Jagdflieger berichtet. Self-published, ca. 1996. 124 p., in German.
Aces of the Luftwaffe. Emil Clade. Retrieved on 7 June 2007.



Franz Büsen

Awards: EK 1 & 2, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109G (Trop), Bf 109G

Remarks: KIA 9 June, 1944. Magnus. One known Desert victory, a Spitfire 5 km east of Korbous on 8 May, 1943. Another, a Baltimore 40 km S of Gaudurra on 24 January, 1944. His 3rd & 4th, both Beaufighters; one 2 km NW of Insel Samos, the other S of Insel Samos, on 9 February, 1944. His 5th, a B-17 in the Zerbst area on 28 May, 1944. His 6th, a B-24 (HSS) SW of Sankt-Pölten on 29 May, 1944.

Asisbiz database list of aerial 5 victories for Franz Büsen

Date Name Unit A/c Type Height Time Comments
Monday, January 24, 1944 Franz Busen 7./JG27 Baltimore Low Level 10:26 40km S Gaudurra (Rhodes)
Wednesday, February 09, 1944 Franz Busen 7./JG27 Beaufighter Low Level   S Insel Samos
Wednesday, February 09, 1944 Franz Busen 7./JG27 Beaufighter Low Level 12:06 2km NW Insel Samos
Sunday, May 28, 1944 Franz Busen 7./JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 14:20 Raum Zerbst
Monday, May 29, 1944 Franz Busen 7./JG27 B-24 Liberator Hss 7300m 09:55 SW Sankt-Polten



Rudolf Moycis

Awards: EP, EK 1 & 2, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109F & G (Trop)

Remarks: KIA 12 October, 1944 (Magnus). Shot down 5 July, 1942 by a P-40 of SAAF No. 2 Sq., piloted by either Lt Burdon or Lt Bryant. He force landed 8 miles E of El Alamein. One known victory, a Spitfire of RAF No. PRU 2, piloted by Flt Lt Day, north of Rethymon N. Africa on 22 September, 1942. Another Spitfire of PRU 2, piloted by P/O Leng (POW), over Tymbaktion, S. Crete on 30 September, 1942. His 3rd, a B-24 10 km west of Amfissa Greece, 5 October, 1943. His 4th, a Baltimore north of Insel Crete, 31 December, 1943. A 5th, a B-26 10 km W of Insel Leros (Greece) on 25 February, 1944. A 6th, a B-26 in northern Crete on 4 March, 1944. A 7th & 8th, both SM 84's (?) 30 km NE of Brindisi on 14 May, 1944. A 9th, a P-51 NW of Meru on 18 August, 1944.

Asisbiz Database of 11 aerial victories for Rudolf Moycis

Date Name Unit A/c Type Height Time Comments
22-Sep-42 Rudolf Moycis 9./JG27 Spitfire   15.20 N Rethymon
30-Sep-42 Rudolf Moycis 9./JG27 Spitfire   09.45 Tympaktion S Kreta
05-Oct-43 Rudolf Moycis 7./JG27 B-24 Liberator 5000m 12.48 10km W Amfissa
31-Dec-43 Rudolf Moycis 7./JG27 Baltimore Low Level 11.03 North of Insel Kreta
25-Feb-44 Rudolf Moycis 7./JG27 B-26 Marauder 3500m 12.52 10km W Insel Leros
04-Mar-44 Rudolf Moycis 7./JG27 B-26 Marauder   15.07 North of Kreta
14-May-44 Rudolf Moycis 7./JG27 SM.84 3000m 16.18 30km NE Brindisi
14-May-44 Rudolf Moycis 7./JG27 SM.84 3000m 16.23 30km NE Brindisi
14-May-44 Rudolf Moycis 7./JG27 SM.84 3000m 16.23 30km NE Brindisi
14-May-44 Rudolf Moycis 7./JG27 SM.84 3000m 16.18 30km NE Brindisi
18-Aug-44 Rudolf Moycis 10./JG27 P-51 Mustang Low Level 19.40 NW Meru



Franz Stadler

Units: EJG Süd, 7./JG-77 (2/44 Greece), 5./JG-51 (5/45)

Awards: EK 2, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109G-5 'White 3' in JG-77

Remarks: In Greece, he was posted at the Cretan airfield of Kastelli. One known victory, an SM 84 (?) 30 km NE of Brindisi Italy on 14 May, 1944. Flugbuch.

Asisbiz Database of 1 aerial victories for Franz Stadler

Date Name Unit A/c Type Height Time Comments
14-May-44 Franz Stadler 7./JG27 SM.84 3000m 16.26 30km NE Brindisi



Max Winkler

Units: I./JG-27 (7/42), 4./JG-1 (5/43), 2./JG-27 (4/44), JG-3

Awards: DK-G(1/1/45), EP, EK 1 & 2, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109F, Bf 109G-6/U4 (lost 2/25/44))

Remarks: Forced to bail after aerial combat on 25 February, 1944, over Ennstal. Friend of Franz Mörl. Survived the war. One known victory, a Hurricane II northeast of El-Hammam N. Africa on 22 July, 1942. Another, a Beaufighter 30 km east of Marsa Matruh on 19 August, 1942. His 5th, a Ventura north of Amsterdam on 3 May, 1943. Numbers 6 and 7 were both P-51's 20 and 45 km west of Bergen on 14 May, 1943. Three known victims, a Ventura on 4 April, 1943, a second Ventura on 3 May, 1943 3 km south of Haarlem, and a B-26 of 322BG on 17 May, 1943, 80 km west of Nordwijk. A P-38 50 km S of Budapest on 3 April, 1944. Another P-38 NE of Varazdin on 6 April, 1944. A B-17 near Dünavoldvar on 13 April, 1944. A B-17 30 km S of Wiener Neustadt on 10 May, 1944. His 14th, a P-47 NW of Magdeburg on 19 May, 1944. His 15th, a B-24 at Markersdorf on 29 May, 1944. His 17th, a Spitfire 15 km ENE of Caen on 15 June, 1944. An Auster III 15 km W of St Lo on 19 July, 1944. A Mosquito at Nozay, 30 km N of Nancy, on 25 July, 1944. A P-51 S of Flers on 26 July, 1944. His 21st, a P-47 SW of Rheine on 31 December, 1944 (Perry Claims). Deceased 14 May, 2000.

Asisbiz Database of 21 aerial victories for Max Winkler

Date Name Unit A/c Type Height Time Comments
22-Jul-42 Max Winkler 2./JG27 Hurricane II   12.10 NE El-Hammam
19-Aug-42 Max Winkler 2./JG27 Beaufighter   07.03 30km E Marsa Matruh
06-Sep-42 Max Winkler 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.11 SSE El-Alamein
18-Mar-43 Max Winkler 2./JG27 B-17 Fortress 100m 16.17 55-5-6 (120km N Terschelling)
03-May-43 Max Winkler 2./JG27 Ventura 300m 17.49 4366 (N Amsterdam)
14-May-43 Max Winkler 2./JG27 P-51 Mustang 10m 15.08 43/3/2 (20km W Bergen)
14-May-43 Max Winkler 2./JG27 P-51 Mustang 10m 15.10 35/4/3 (45km W Bergen)
23-Feb-44 Max Winkler 2./JG27 B-24 Liberator 6000m 12.07 West of Wels
24-Feb-44 Max Winkler 2./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6700m 12.48 gegend Mondsee/Traunsee
03-Apr-44 Max Winkler 2./JG27 P-38 Lightning 7000m 10.39 50km S Budapest
06-Apr-44 Max Winkler 2./JG27 P-38 Lightning 2500m 16.40 MN-MO (NE Varazdin)
13-Apr-44 Max Winkler 2./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6000m 15.15 bei Dunavoldvar
10-May-44 Max Winkler 2./JG27 B-17 Fortress   11.08 FN-14 30km S Wiener Neustadt
19-May-44 Max Winkler 2./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt   13.25 GC (NW Magdeburg)
29-May-44 Max Winkler 2./JG27 B-24 Liberator 7500m 09.38 Markersdorf
14-Jun-44 Max Winkler 2./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 400m 12.14 SE Caen
15-Jun-44 Max Winkler 1./JG27 Spitfire 35-4000m 19.43 15km ENE Caen
19-Jul-44 Max Winkler 1./JG27 Auster III 200m 15.05 15 West S/US 5 (15km W St Lo)
25-Jul-44 Max Winkler 1./JG27 Mosquito Low Level 17.30 FR-6 (Nozay 30km N Nantes)
26-Jul-44 Max Winkler 1./JG27 P-51 Mustang 2000m 14.43 14 Ost N/BT-23 (S Flers)
31-Dec-44 Max Winkler 1./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt   12.35 SW Rheine



Werner Schroer

Werner Schroer was born on 12 December 1918 at Mülheim in Ruhr. His Luftwaffe career began in 1937 as a member of the ground staff. In May 1940 he completed his flying training. On 27 August 1940 he joined 2./JG27 based on the Channel front. He flew his first combat missions during the Battle of Britain but did not claim any confirmed victories. In March 1941, I./JG27 was deployed toin order to support the Schroer claimed his first victory, a RAF Hurricane, on 19 April 1941, however, his Bf-109E (WNr 3790) was hit and he had to make a forced-landing near his airfield with 48 bullet holes in his aircraft.

On 21 April, in an engagement with RAF Hurricanes, an aircraft collided with his Bf-109E (WNr 4170) slightly injuring him and requiring him to make another forced-landing. By the end of 1941 his score stood at seven. In March 1942, he was appointed Adjutant of I./JG27. He was appointed Staffelkapitän of 8./JG27 on 22 June. In July he recorded 16 victories.

On 9 September, he was awarded the Deutsches Kreuz in Gold. He shot down 13 enemy aircraft in September, including six on 15 September to record his 35th through 40th victories. In October, Schroer claimed 15 victories. Leutnant Schroer was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 21 October for 49 victories. On 4 November, Schroer, with Alfred Stückler (10 victories), shot down two four-engined B-24s. On 11 February 1943, Schroer reportedly although he claimed them as B-26s.

When Major Gustav Rödel (98 victories, including 13 four-engined bombers, RK-EL) was appointed Kommodore of JG27, Hauptmann Schroer took his place as Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG27 on 22 April 1943. Operating over Sicily and southern Italy, between 29 April and 23 July, Schroer was to claim 22 Allied aircraft shot down, including 12 four-engined bombers. On 2 August, he became the 268th recipient of the Eichenlaub, awarded for his 84 victories. In August 1943, II./JG27 was redeployed to Wiesbaden-Erbenheim in Germany for Reichsverteidigung duties. On 6 September, Schroer led the Gruppe on an interception of a formation of 262 B-17s. In all 45 American bombers were lost including four shot down by II./JG27, three of which were claimed by Schroer as his victories 86 through 88.

On 3 March 1944, Major Schroer scored his 99th victory and was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of III./JG54, relieving Major Rudolf Sinner (39 victories, DK) who had been badly wounded on 6 March attacking a formation of four-engined bombers III./JG54 was based at Lüneberg and flew the Bf-109G-6.

On 24 May, Schroer shot down a P-51 and two P-47s for his 100th to 102nd victories. On 21 July 1944, Schroer relinquished command of III./JG54 to Hauptmann Robert 'Bazi' Weiss (121 victories, RK-EL, killed in action 29 December 1944). Schroer was transferred to a fighter pilot school as an instructor. On 4 August, he had to make a forced-landing when his engine malfunctioned. From November 1944 to February 1945 Schroer was retained in a training role.

On 14 February 1945, Schroer was appointed Kommodore of JG3. With this unit he quickly claimed 12 Russian aircraft destroyed. On 19 April 1945 he became the 144th recipient of the Schwertern. Werner Schroer survived the war. He died on 10 February 1985 in Munich, aged 67.

Werner Schroer was credited with 114 victories flying 197 missions. 102 of his victories were scored on the Western front, including 61 claimed over North Africa, and 26 four-engined bombers.

Asisbiz database list of aerial victories for Werner Schroer

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location / Comments
1. 19.4.1941 - 1./JG27 W Tobruk
2. 25.6.1941 - 1./JG27 S Sidi Barrani
3. 8.7.1941 - 1./JG27 W Bardia
4. 19.7.1941 18:17 P-40 1./JG27 NE Ras Asaz
5. 21.8.1941 18.20 1./JG27 NE Bardia
6. 29.8.1941 18:10 P-40 1./JG27 NW Sidi Barrani
7. 14.9.1941 15:55 1./JG27 S El Hambra
8. 30.5.1942 14:05 P-40 Stab I./JG27 NE Bir Hacheim
9. 10.6.1942 7:49 P-40 Stab I./JG27 5km W Bir Hacheim
10. 15.6.1942 18:06 P-40 Stab I./JG27 NW El Adem
11. 15.6.1942 18:11 P-40 Stab I./JG27 NW El Adem
12. 23.6.1942 14:40 P-40 8./JG27 10km S Sidi Omar
13. 26.6.1942 11:40 P-40 8./JG27 SW Mersa Matruch
14. 26.6.1942 11:44 8./JG27 SW Mersa Matruch
15. 26.6.1942 16:10 P-40 8./JG27 SW Mersa Matruch
16. 2.7.1942 7:00 P-40 8./JG27 SE El-Alamein
17. 2.7.1942 7:05 P-40 8./JG27 E El-Alamein
18. 3.7.1942 14:40 8./JG27 S Imayid
19. 3.7.1942 14:47 8./JG27 SE El-Hammam
20. 3.7.1942 14:50 P-40 8./JG27 SE El-Hammam
21. 4.7.1942 18:40 P-40 8./JG27 SE El-Alamein
22. 6.7.1942 11:45 P-40 8./JG27 20km SW El-Alamein
23. 6.7.1942 11:48 P-40 8./JG27 21km SW El-Alamein
24. 11.7.1942 16:05 8./JG27 SE El-Alamein
25. 11.7.1942 16:10 P-40 8./JG27 SW El-Alamein
26. 13.7.1942 9:57 8./JG27 S El Hammam
27. 13.7.1942 10:02 8./JG27 S El Hammam
28. 13.7.1942 10:05 8./JG27 S El Hammam
29. 14.7.1942 10:15 P-40 8./JG27 SW El-Alamein
30. 16.7.1942 18:30 P-40 8./JG27 SW El-Alamein
31. 17.7.1942 18:25 P-40 8./JG27 W El-Alamein
32. 8.9.1942 12:45 8./JG27 Deir-El-Tarfa area
33. 8.9.1942 12:50 8./JG27 Deir-El-Tarfa area
34. 13.9.1942 17:25 P-40 8./JG27 7km SW El-Alamein
35. 15.9.1942 11:40 P-40 8./JG27 W El-Alamein
36. 15.9.1942 11:43 P-40 8./JG27 W El-Alamein
37. 15.9.1942 11:55 P-40 8./JG27 S El-Alamein
38. 15.9.1942 16:45 P-40 8./JG27 NE Deir-El-Tarfa
39. 15.9.1942 16:55 P-40 8./JG27 NE Deir-El-Tarfa
40. 15.9.1942 17:03 8./JG27 El-Alamein area
41. 16.9.1942 9:25 P-40 8./JG27 S El-Alamein
42. 20.9.1942 16:33 P-40 8./JG27 8km SW El-Alamein
43. 21.9.1942 16:30 8./JG27 N El-Hammam
44. 30.9.1942 10:30 8./JG27 Abu-Dweis
45. 2.10.1942 15:40 P-40 8./JG27 NNE Deir-El-Tarfa
46. 9.10.1942 9:25 Boston 8./JG27 NE El-Daba
47. 9.10.1942 16:15 8./JG27 NW El-Daba
48. 9.10.1942 16:20 8./JG27 SE Bir-el-Abd
49. 20.10.1942 14:12 P-40 8./JG27 SW Deir-El-Tarfa
50. 23.10.1942 8:00 P-46 8./JG27 NE El-Alamein
51. 23.10.1942 8:30 P-46 8./JG27 SE El-Alamein
52. 24.10.1942 8:25 P-40 8./JG27 NE El-Alamein
53. 24.10.1942 16:45 8./JG27 SW El-Alamein
54. 26.10.1942 13:10 P-40 8./JG27 W El-Alamein
55. 27.10.1942 - P-40 8./JG27 NW Quotaifiya
56. 27.10.1942 - P-40 8./JG27 N Quotaifiya
57. 27.10.1942 - P-40 8./JG27 NE El-Daba
58. 29.10.1942 12:25 8./JG27 S El-Alamein
59. 30.10.1942 9:20 P-39 8./JG27 SSE El-Daba
60. 4.11.1942 12:15 B-24 8./JG27 between Sollum and Benghasi
61. 16.11.1942 15:20 P-40 8./JG27 S Tecis
62. 11.2.1943 13:30 B-26 8./JG27 NNE Karpathos / in fact Beaufort
63. 11.2.1943 13:34 B-26 8./JG27 NNE Karpathos / in fact Beaufort
64. 29.4.1943 18:08 P-38 Stab II./JG27 60km SE Maréttimo
65. 29.4.1943 18:10 P-38 Stab II./JG27 60km SE Maréttimo
66. 5.5.1943 15:00 B-24 Stab II./JG27 NW Maréttimo
67. 9.5.1943 13:10 B-24 Stab II./JG27 E Capo Gallo
68. 9.5.1943 13:40 P-38 Stab II./JG27 70km NW Capo San Vito
69. 11.5.1943 11:46 P-38 Stab II./JG27 60km NE Cap Bon
70. 11.5.1943 12:14 B-17 Stab II./JG27 S Marsala
71. 18.5.1943 13:45 B-17 Stab II./JG27 NW Trapani
72. 19.5.1943 13:42 P-38 Stab II./JG27 W Maréttimo
73. 21.5.1943 11:21 B-17 Stab II./JG27 S Marsala
74. 21.5.1943 11:28 Stab II./JG27 NW Pantelleria
75. 25.5.1943 11:17 B-17 Stab II./JG27 NW Maréttimo
76. 31.5.1943 14:40 B-17 Stab II./JG27 WNW Trapani
77. 7.6.1943 6:44 P-40 Stab II./JG27 5km N Pantelleria
78. 10.6.1943 9:26 P-46 Stab II./JG27 3km SSW Granitola Torreta
79. 10.6.1943 9:27 P-46 Stab II./JG27 4km SSW Granitola Torreta
80. 10.6.1943 - Boston Stab II./JG27  
81. 15.6.1943 8:23 B-17 Stab II./JG27 2km W Favignana
82. 11.7.1943 13:20 B-24 Stab II./JG27 25km S Crotone
83. 16.7.1943 13:00 B-24 Stab II./JG27 5km SW Santeramo in Colle
84. 16.7.1943 13:15 B-24 Stab II./JG27 10km WSW Bari
85. 23.7.1943 14:10 B-17 Stab II./JG27 20km N Stromboli
86. 6.9.1943 11:08 B-17 Stab II./JG27 E Geislingen
87. 6.9.1943 - B-17 HSS Stab II./JG27 S Echterdingen
88. 6.9.1943 - B-17 HSS Stab II./JG27 SE Stuttgart
89. 14.10.1943 - B-17 Stab II./JG27 Alzey
90. 29.11.1943 14:48 B-17 Stab II./JG27 SSW Bremen
91. 19.12.1943 12:38 B-17 Stab II./JG27 Krimml
92. 7.1.1944 12:07 P-38 Stab II./JG27 N Saarbrücken
93. 7.1.1944 12:20 P-38 Stab II./JG27 N Saarbrücken
94. 11.1.1944 12:25 B-24 Stab II./JG27 SE Assen
95. 11.1.1944 13:30 B-17 HSS Stab II./JG27 W Almelo
96. 29.1.1944 11:02 B-17 HSS Stab II./JG27 St. Wendel
97. 25.2.1944 12:28 B-17 Stab II./JG27 20km NE Chiemsee
98. 25.2.1944 12:31 B-17 Stab II./JG27 Altötting
99. 3.3.1944 12:23 P-38 Stab II./JG27 Magdeburg
100. 24.5.1944 - B-17 Stab III./JG54  
101. 24.5.1944 - B-17 Stab III./JG54  
102. 24.5.1944 - P-51 Stab III./JG54  
103. 11.3.1945 - P-39 Stab JG3  
104. 11.3.1945 - Pe-2 Stab JG3  
105. 11.3.1945 - Pe-2 Stab JG3  
106. 15.3.1945 - P-39 Stab JG3  
107. 15.3.1945 - La-5 Stab JG3  
108. 15.3.1945 - Yak-3 Stab JG3  
109. 19.4.1945 - Il-2 Stab JG3  
110. 19.4.1945 - Yak-3 Stab JG3  
111. 24.4.1945 - Yak-3 Stab JG3  
112. 24.4.1945 - Yak-9 Stab JG3  
113. 26.4.1945 - La-5 Stab JG3  
114. 26.4.1945 - La-5 Stab JG3  

Victories : 114
Awards : Knight`s Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords
Units : JG27, JG54, JG3
http://www.luftwaffe.cz/schroer.html

Asisbiz database list of aerial victories for Werner Schroer

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
19-Apr-41 Werner Schroer 1./JG27 Hurricane I     West of Tobruk
25-Jun-41 Werner Schroer 1./JG27     S Sidi Barrani
08-Jul-41 Werner Schroer 1./JG27     West of Bardia
19-Jul-41 Werner Schroer 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.17 NE Ras Asaz
21-Aug-41 Werner Schroer 1./JG27   18.20 NE Bardia
29-Aug-41 Werner Schroer 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.10 NW Sidi Barrani
14-Sep-41 Werner Schroer 1./JG27 Hurricane I   15.55 South of El Hambra
30-May-42 Werner Schroer Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.05 NE Bir Hacheim
10-Jun-42 Werner Schroer Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.49 5km W Bir Hacheim
15-Jun-42 Werner Schroer Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.11 NW El Adem
15-Jun-42 Werner Schroer Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.06 NW El Adem
23-Jun-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.40 10km S Sidi Omar
26-Jun-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.40 SW Marsa Matruh
26-Jun-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   11.44 SW Marsa Matruh
26-Jun-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.10 SW Marsa Matruh
02-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.00 SE El-Alamein
02-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.05 E El-Alamein
03-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   14.47 SE El-Hammam
03-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.50 SE El-Hammam
03-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   14.40 South of El-Imayid
04-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk     SE El-Alamein
06-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.45 20km SW El-Alamein
06-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.48 21km SW El-Alamein
11-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 300m 16.05 10km SE El-Alamein
11-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 150m 16.10 10km SE El-Alamein
13-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   10.05 S El-Hammam
13-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   09.57 S El-Hammam
13-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   10.02 S El-Hammam
14-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.15 SW El-Alamein
16-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.30 SW El-Alamein
17-Jul-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.25 West of El-Alamein
08-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   12.45 Raum Dir-el-Tarfa
08-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   12.50 Raum Dir-el-Tarfa
13-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.25 7km SW El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   17.03 Raum El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.55 NE Deir-el-Tarfa
15-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.40 West of El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.43 West of El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.55 South of El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.45 NW Deir-el-Tarfa
16-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.25 South of El-Alamein
20-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.33 8km SW El-Alamein
21-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   16.30 North of EL-Hammam
30-Sep-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   10.30 bei Abu Dweis
02-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   15.40 NNE Deir-el-Tarfa
09-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   16.20 SE Bir-el-Abd
09-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 A-20 Boston   09.25 NE El-Daba
09-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   16.15 NW El-Daba
20-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.12 SW Deir-el-Tarfa
23-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 Curtiss P-46   08.30 NE El-Alamein
23-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 Curtiss P-46   08.00 NE El-Alamein
24-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.25 NE El-Alamein
24-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   16.45 SW El-Alamein
26-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.10 West of El-Alamein
27-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk     NW Quotaifiya
27-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk     NW Quotaifiya
27-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk     NE El-Daba
29-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27   12.25 South of El-Alamein
30-Oct-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-39 Aircobra   09.20 SSE El-Daba
04-Nov-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 B-24 Liberator   12.15 zw Sollum u Benghazi
16-Nov-42 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   15.20 South of Tecis
11-Feb-43 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 Beaufort   13.30 NNE Insel Karpathos (Aegean)
11-Feb-43 Werner Schroer 8./JG27 Beaufort   13.34 NNE Insel Karpathos (Aegean)
29-Apr-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 P-38F Lightning 50m 18.08 61km SE Marettimo
29-Apr-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 P-38F Lightning 50m 18.10 60km SW Marettimo
05-May-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-24D Liberator   15.00 NW Marettimo
09-May-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-24 Liberator   13.10 1km E Cap Gallo
09-May-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 P-38 Lightning 8500m 13.40 70km NW Cap San Vito
11-May-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress 3000m 12.14 25km S Marsala
11-May-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 P-38 Lightning 6500m 11.46 60km NE Cape Bon
18-May-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress II 4500m 13.45 50km NW Trapani
19-May-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 P-38 Lightning 1000m 13.42 10km W Marettimo
21-May-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 800m 11.28 20km NW Pantellaria
21-May-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17F 7000m 11.21 35km S. Marsala
25-May-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17F 2200m 11.17 40km NW Marettimo
31-May-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17F 100m 14.40 300° Trapani
07-Jun-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 Curtiss P-46   06.44 5km N Pantellaria
10-Jun-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 P-40E Warhawk 100m 09.26 3km SSW Granitola Toretta
10-Jun-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 A-20 Boston      
10-Jun-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 P-40E Warhawk 150m 09.27 3-4km SSW Granitola Toretta
15-Jun-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17F 3600m 08.23 2km W Favignana
11-Jul-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-24D Liberator 5500m 13.20 25km S Crotone in See
16-Jul-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-24D Liberator 6500m 13.00 5km SW Santeramo in Colle
16-Jul-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-24D Liberator 6300m 13.15 10km SW Bari
23-Jul-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress   14.10 20km North of Stromboli
06-Sep-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6000m 11.08 E Geislingen (N Neu Ulm)
06-Sep-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress Hss     SEStuttgart
06-Sep-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6000m 11.00 10km W Echterdingen
14-Oct-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress     Alzey 15km SE Bad Kreuznach
14-Oct-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6500m 14.20 Alzey (NW Worms)
29-Nov-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress 8500m 14.48 SW Bremen
19-Dec-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6000m 12.28 Krimmel (Memmingen)
19-Dec-43 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6000m 12.28 Krimmel (Memmingen)
07-Jan-44 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 P-38 Lightning   12.07 NSaarbrucken
07-Jan-44 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 P-38 Lightning   12.20 N Saarbrucken
11-Jan-44 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-24 Liberator   12.25 SE Assen
11-Jan-44 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-24 Liberator Hss   13.30 West of Almelo
29-Jan-44 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress Hss   11.02 Sankt Wendel 25km NE Saarbrucken
25-Feb-44 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6500m 12.28 20km NE Chiemsee
25-Feb-44 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6500m 12.31 vermbAltotting
03-Mar-44 Werner Schroer Stab II./JG27 P-38 Lightning   12.23 Magdeburg
24-May-44 Werner Schroer Stab III./JG54 P-51 Mustang 7000m 11.15 Berlin-Stadt
24-May-44 Werner Schroer Stab III./JG54 B-17 Fortress 6500m 11.40 bei Wittstock
24-May-44 Werner Schroer Stab III./JG54 B-17 Fortress 6500m 11.45 bei Wittstock
11-Mar-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 Pe-2   - -
11-Mar-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 Pe-2   - -
11-Mar-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 P-39 Aircobra   - -
15-Mar-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 P-39 Aircobra   - -
15-Mar-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 La-5   - -
15-Mar-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 Jak-3   - -
19-Apr-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 Il-2   - -
19-Apr-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 Jak-3   - -
24-Apr-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 Jak-9   - -
24-Apr-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 Jak-3   - -
26-Apr-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 La-5   - -
26-Apr-45 Werner Schroer StabJG3 La-5   - -



Otto Schulz

Otto Schulz was born on 11 February 1911 at Treptow an der Rega in the Greifenberg region of Pommern. He joined the Luftwaffe in 1934 and served for many years as an instructor. On 3 January 1940, Schulz was transferred to 4./JG27. He participated in the French campaign and the Battle of Britain. He recorded his first victory on 31 August 1940, when he shot down a RAF Spitfire fighter near Dover. By the end of 1940, he had four victories to his credit. In April 1941, Schulz participated in the Balkans invasion. He recorded two victories over Greece, including a Greek PZL fighter shot down over the airfield at Larissa on 15 April and a RAF Hurricane fighter shot down near Megara on 20 April.

Schulz participated in the invasion of Russia. He claimed three victories during June 1941, before the unit was transferred to the Mediterranean theatre in September. Operating over the deserts of North Africa, Schulz was to be particularly successful. On each of the days 6 October 1941, 20 October and 28 November, he recorded three victories. Schulz shot down two RAF P-40 fighters on 30 November to record his 23rd and 24th victories. Both were piloted by notable Allied pilots: Australian, Sergeant Alan 'Tiny' Cameron (6.5 confirmed, 1 probable and 7 damaged victories) of 3Sqn, RAAF, who crash-landed and British pilot Pilot Officer Neville Duke (26.833 confirmed, 1 probable and 6 damaged victories) of 112Sqn, RAF.

He claimed another notable RAF pilot on 15 December (30), when he shot down and killed Pilot Officer Geoffrey Ranger (5.333 confirmed, 1 probable and 1 damaged victories) of 250Sqn, RAF. It is also thought that Schulz was the victor, when he shot down a Curtiss P-40 flown by the Australian ace, Flying Officer Andrew 'Nicky' Barr (11 confirmed, 3 probable and 8 damaged victories) of 3Sqn, RAAF , who crash-landed in the Agedabia-El Brega area, wounded on 11 January. He shot down five Curtiss P-40 fighters in 10 minutes on 15 February 1942 (40-44), including another British ace, S/L Ernest 'Imshi' Mason (15.4 confirmed and 3.6 damaged victories) of 94Sqn, RAF, who was killed in this engagement.

Oberfeldwebel Schulz was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 22 February. He was promoted to the rank of Leutnant in April. On 31 May, Schulz recorded another Curtiss P-40 victory (49), flown by yet another notable Allied ace, South African Major Andrew Duncan (5.5 confirmed and 1 probable victories) of 5Sqn, SAAF, who was killed in the engagement. On 17 June 1942, Schulz was shot down and killed in aerial combat. He had shot down an RAF Hurricane fighter, flown by Canadian ace Flight Lieutenant Walter 'Wally' Conrad (6.5 confirmed, 3 probable and 11 damaged victories) of 274Sqn, RAF, who suffered wounds in the engagement, for his 51st, and last, victory. However, Schulz was then shot down in Bf 109F-4 (W.Nr 10271) <+ by a RAF Curtiss P-40 in the Sidi Rezegh area. It is thought his victor was Canadian ace Flight Sergeant James 'Eddie' Edwards (16.083 confirmed, 8.5 probable and 13 damaged victories) of 260Sqn, RAF.

Otto Schulz was credited with 51 victories in approximately 400 missions. He recorded three victories over the Eastern front and 48 victories over the Western front.

Asisbiz database list of 51 aerial victories for Otto Schulz

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location Comments
1 31.8.1940 13:40 4./JG27 Dover -
2 1.9.1940 15:15 4./JG27 Ashford -
3 3.9.1940 11:35 4./JG27 Themsemündung -
4 28.10.1940 15:30 4./JG27 Gravesend -
5 15.4.1941 6:55 PZL P.24 4./JG27 W Trikkala -
6 20.4.1941 17:10 4./JG27 Megara -
7 22.6.1941 8:20 I-15 4./JG27 N Olytus -
8 26.6.1941 9:25 SB-3 4./JG27 NNW Wilna -
9 26.6.1941 14:40 SB-3 4./JG27 E Paratjanowo -
10 10.10.1941 9:10 P-40 4./JG27 SE Sidi Omar Tomahawk of 2Sqn SAAF
11 10.10.1941 9:15 4./JG27 SE Sidi Omar -
12 10.10.1941 9:20 4./JG27 SE Sidi Omar -
13 30.10.1941 9:30 4./JG27 S Bardia -
14 30.10.1941 9:35 4./JG27 10km E Sidi Omar -
15 30.10.1941 9:43 4./JG27 25km SW Sollum -
16 17.11.1941 7:10 Bombay 4./JG27 NE Ain-el-Gazala -
17 21.11.1941 9:55 Wellington 4./JG27 SW El Adem Wellington of 109Sqn RAF
18 22.11.1941 16:55 P-40 4./JG27 20km SE Bir Hacheim Tomahawk of 112Sqn RAF or 3Sqn RAAF
19 25.11.1941 16:00 P-40 4./JG27 N Tobruk -
20 28.11.1941 16:00 P-40 4./JG27 N El Adem -
21 28.11.1942 16:10 4./JG27 SW El Adem Hurricane of 94Sqn RAF flown by F/O Vos, killed
22 28.11.1942 16:12 4./JG27 El Adem Hurricane of 94Sqn RAF flown by Lt Palm, killed
23 30.11.1942 9:10 P-40 4./JG27 NE Bir-el-Gobi Tomahawk IIb (AK506) of 3Sqn RAAF flown by Sgt AC Cameron (6.5/1/7 victories), baled out
24 30.11.1942 9:20 P-40 4./JG27 SW El Adem Tomahawk IIb (AK402) “F” of 112Sqn RAF flown by P/O NF Duke (26.833/1/6 victories), crash-landed
25 4.12.1941 10:16 P-40 4./JG27 Bir-el-Gobi  -
26 6.12.1941 12:28 4./JG27 SE El Adem Blenheim of LorraineSqn RAF
27 6.12.1941 12:30 4./JG27 SE El Adem -
28 7.12.1941 9:50 Boston 4./JG27 S Ain-el-Gazala Boston of 24Sqn SAAF
29 8.12.1941 13:10 Boston 4./JG27 N Ridotto Boston of 24Sqn SAAF
30 15.12.1941 11:30 P-40 4./JG27 SW Geziregh Tomahawk IIb of 250Sqn RAF flown by P/O GH Ranger (5.333/1/1 victories), killed
31 20.12.1941 9:40 P-40 4./JG27 W Maraua Tomahawk of 112 or 250Sqn RAF
32 20.12.1941 9:43 P-40 4./JG27 W Maraua Tomahawk of 112 or 250Sqn RAF
33 11.1.1942 13:10 P-40 4./JG27 NE Antelat Kittyhawk (AK645) of 3Sqn RAAF flown by F/O AW Barr (11/3/8 victories), crash-landed, wounded
34 25.1.1942 16:35 P-40 4./JG27 NE Antelat Kittyhawk of 250Sqn RAF
35 25.1.1942 16:40 P-40 4./JG27 25km NE Antelat -
36 8.2.1942 10:35 P-40 4./JG27 W Ain-el-Gazala -
37 8.2.1942 10:40 P-40 4./JG27 E Ain-el-Gazala -
38 13.2.1942 10:22 P-40 4./JG27 NE Tobruk -
39 13.2.1942 10:30 P-40 4./JG27 Tobruk -
40 15.2.1942 17:45 P-40 4./JG27 SE Martuba Kittyhawk of 94Sqn RAF flown by S/L EM Mason (15.4/0/3.6 victories), killed
41 15.2.1942 17:46 P-40 4./JG27 SE Martuba Kittyhawk of 94Sqn RAF flown by Sgt Belcher
42 15.2.1942 17:47 P-40 4./JG27 SE Martuba Kittyhawk of 94Sqn RAF flown by Sgt Weightman
43 15.2.1942 17:50 P-40 4./JG27 W Ain-el-Gazala Kittyhawk of 94Sqn RAF flown by P/O Marshall
44 15.2.1942 17:55 P-40 4./JG27 SE Martuba Kittyhawk of 94Sqn RAF flown by Sgt McQueen, damaged, returned
45 13.3.1942 12:35 P-40 4./JG27 SW Tobruk Kittyhawk of 112Sqn RAF flown by Sgt Rozanski
46 15.3.1942 11:32 P-40 4./JG27 10-12km S Fort Acroma Kittyhawk of 450Sqn RAF
47 28.5.1942 12:20 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 15km NW El Adem Kittyhawk of 260Sqn RAF flown by Sgt Ovenston
48 28.5.1942 16:12 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 15km E El Adem Tomahawk of 5Sqn SAAF flown by Lt Pare, baled out
49 31.5.1942 18:57 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 20km SW El Adem Tomahawk IIb (AN523) "R" of 5Sqn SAAF flown by Maj A Duncan (5.5/1/0 victories), killed
50 31.5.1942 19:00 P-40 Stab II./JG 27 15km SW El Adem Tomahawk of 5Sqn SAAF flown by Capt Copeland
51 17.6.1942 10:20 Stab II./JG 27 E Bu Amud Hurricane of 274Sqn RAF flown by F/Lt WAG Conrad (6.5/3/11 victories), wounded

Victories : 51
Awards : Ehrenpokal (30 December 1941)
Deutsches Kreuz in Gold (14 February 1942)
Ritterkreuz (22 February 1942)
Units : JG27

Website Reference: http://www.luftwaffe.cz/schulz.html

Asisbiz Database of 53 aerial victories for Otto Schulz

Date Pilot Name Unit EA Type Height Time Location
31-Aug-40 Otto Schulz 4./JG27   13.40 Dover
01-Sep-40 Otto Schulz 4./JG27   15.15 Ashford
03-Sep-40 Otto Schulz 4./JG27   11.35 Thames Estuary
28-Oct-40 Otto Schulz 4./JG27   15.30 Gravesend
15-Apr-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 PZL P-24   06.55 West of Tríkala Greece
20-Apr-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 Hurricane I   17.10 Megara
22-Jun-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.20  
26-Jun-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 SB-3   14.40  
26-Jun-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 SB-3   09.25  
06-Oct-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Tomahawk   09.10 SE Sidi Omar
06-Oct-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27   09.15 SE Sidi Omar
06-Oct-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27   09.20 SE Sidi Omar
30-Oct-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27   09.30 South of Bardia
30-Oct-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 5-10m 09.35 10km E Sidi Omar
30-Oct-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 3000m 09.43 20-30km SW Sollum
17-Nov-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 Bombay 50m 07.10 NE Ain-el-Gazala
21-Nov-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 Wellington   09.55 SW El Adem
22-Nov-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 2000m 16.55 20km SE Bir el Hamma
22-Nov-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 2000m 16.55 20km SE Bir Hacheim
25-Nov-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.00 N Tobruk
28-Nov-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.00 N El Adem
28-Nov-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27   16.10 SW El Adem
28-Nov-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27   16.12 El Adem
30-Nov-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.10 NE Bir-el-Gobi
30-Nov-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.20 SW El Adem
04-Dec-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.16 Bir-el-Gobi
06-Dec-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27   12.30 SE El Adem
06-Dec-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27   12.28 SE El Adem
07-Dec-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 A-20 Boston III   09.50 S Ain-el-Gazala
08-Dec-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 Douglas   13.10 N Ridotto
15-Dec-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.30 SW Geziregh
20-Dec-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.43 West of Maraua
20-Dec-41 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.40 West of Maraua
11-Jan-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.10 Antelat
25-Jan-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.35 NE Antelat
25-Jan-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 50m 16.40 25km NE Antelat
08-Feb-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.40 East of Ain-el-Gazala
08-Feb-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 1000m 10.35 FlPl Ain-el-Gazala West
13-Feb-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.22 NE Tobruk
13-Feb-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.30 Tobruk
15-Feb-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.45 SE Martuba
15-Feb-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.46 SE Martuba
15-Feb-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.47 SE Martuba
15-Feb-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.50 West of Ain-el-Gazala
15-Feb-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.55 30-35km SE Martuba
13-Mar-42 Otto Schulz 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.35 SW Tobruk
15-Mar-42 Otto Schulz 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 400m 11.32 10-12km S Fort Acroma
28-May-42 Otto Schulz Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.20 15km NW El Adem
28-May-42 Otto Schulz Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.12 15km E El Adem
30-May-42 Otto Schulz Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   19.00  
31-May-42 Otto Schulz Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   19.00 15km SW El Adem
31-May-42 Otto Schulz Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 500m 18.57 20km SE El-Adem
17-Jun-42 Otto Schulz Stab II./JG27   10.20 East of Bu-Ahmud



Franz Stigler alternate spelling: Steigler & Stiegler

Units:Flt Instr('40), 4/JG-27(5/42 Africa), 6/JG-27(9/43), 4/JG-27(4/44), Actg Kdr III/JG-27(10/44), JV-44(2/45)

Awards:DK-G(10/1/44), EP, EK 1 & 2, Wound Badge, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft:Bf 109F/Trop WNr 8401 'Wht 12+-' (80% dam 6/5/42; eng dam near Tmimi) w/4 Staffel, Bf 109G-6 'Yel 2' ('44), Fw 190D-9, Me 262A-1a 'White 3'

Remarks:On 20 Dec., 1943, Stigler refused to shoot down the heavily damaged B-17 F, Ser.# 42-3167, "Ye Olde Pub", of 379BG. The B-17 pilot, 2nd Lt. Charles L. Brown, learned the identity of the chivilrous pilot in 1990, and they have been friends ever since. Stigler now lives in Vancouver, B.C. and Brown in Miami. Article of the event and a Stigler autographed photo on file. 487 missions. 17 victories in the Desert. 11 bombers, 2 with the Me 262. Shot down 17 times, bailing 6 times. Serious wounds from B-17 return fire, shattering his windshield. 30 unconfirmed victories. Nominated for the RK. One known victory, a P-40 SW of Ft. Acroma North Africa on 31 May, 1942. Another, a Spitfire V N of El Alamein on 10 July, 1942. A P-38F on 16 April, 1943. His 20th, a B-17 10 km S of Urach, E of Freiburg , on 6 September, 1943. A double victory, Nos 21 & 22, on 29 November, 1943; both B-17's, one 3 km NW of Harpstedt, the other (an HSS) 15 km SW of Wildenhausen. His 24th, a B-24 NW of Cirkle on 19 March, 1944. his 25th, a P-38 2 km W of Dunavecse on 3 April, 1944. A Spitfire in the Rambouillet area on 16 August, 1944. His famous student, Barkhorn! Deceased March 2008, British Columbia. Alternate spelling: Steigler & Stiegler (109 Loss List).

Asisbiz database list of 29 aerial victories for Franz Stigler

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
Sunday, May 31, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   06:23 SW Fort Acroma
Friday, June 26, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18:57 S Marsa Matruh
Friday, July 10, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27   10:40 North of El-Alamein
Friday, July 17, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13:24 SE El-Alamein
Thursday, July 23, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27   18:15 East of El-Alamein
Thursday, August 06, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12:04 East of Deir-el-Abiad
Friday, August 07, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27   12:20 ENE Alam-el-Kadim
Friday, August 07, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27   12:14 SE Alam-el-Kadim
Monday, August 10, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27   08:33 NNE El-Muhafid
Monday, August 10, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08:32 North of El-Muhafid
Tuesday, August 11, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27   10:13 S El-Hammam
Wednesday, August 12, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27   07:03 SW Alam-el-Halfa
Wednesday, August 12, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27   06:45 SSE El-Alamein
Wednesday, August 12, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27   06:53 S Alam-el-Kadim
Sunday, August 16, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27   08:38 SSW El-Hammam
Sunday, August 16, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08:28 South of Alam-el-Kadim
Saturday, August 22, 1942 Franz Stigler 4./JG27   07:31 SSW Alam Uzeiligh
Friday, April 16, 1943 Franz Stigler 6./JG27 P-38F Lightning 4000m 17:03 70km NW Insel Marettimo
Monday, September 06, 1943 Franz Stigler 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress   11:00 5-10km S Urach E Freiburg
Monday, November 29, 1943 Franz Stigler 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress Hss 80m 15:56 15km SW Wildenhausen
Monday, November 29, 1943 Franz Stigler 6./JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 15:25 3km NW Harpstedt
Sunday, March 19, 1944 Franz Stigler 12./JG27 B-24 Liberator 6000m 14:14 NW Cirkle
Sunday, March 19, 1944 Franz Stigler 12./JG27 B-24 Liberator 6500m 13:46 South of Marburg/Drau
Monday, April 03, 1944 Franz Stigler 12./JG27 P-38 Lightning 5500m 10:55 2km W Dunavecse
Monday, April 24, 1944 Franz Stigler 11./JG27 P-51 Mustang   14:12  
Wednesday, August 16, 1944 Franz Stigler 11./JG27 3000m 17:06 BD (Rambouillet area)



Friedrich Körner

Friedrich Körner was born on 24 January 1921 at Schwerte in Ruhrgebiet. Körner enlisted in the Luftwaffe on 15 November 1939 and on completion of fighter pilot training was assigned to 2./JG 27 based in North Africa. He duly arrived on 4 July 1941. His first victory was achieved on 12 October 1941, when he shot down a RAF Tomahawk fighter over Sheferzen. On 19 March 1942, Körner shot down a RAF P-40 fighter over the sea east of Tobruk for his 10th victory and JG 27's 1000th aerial victory. Körner enjoyed his best day of aerial combat over Marsa Martruh where, on 26 June 1942, he shot down three SAAF P-40 fighters and two RAF Spitfire fighters. Körner shot down 20 aircraft during June 1942. He was the 7th highest scoring German ace in North Africa. Körner was able to achieve multiple kills no less than 7 times while deployed in the North African desert.

On 4 July 1942, exactly one year to the day after his arrival in the desert, Körner scrambled in Bf 109 F-4trop (W.Nr. 8696) “Red 9” on a mission to intercept a formation of enemy bombers. Before he could reach the bombers he was intercepted by a flight of South African Hurricane IIC fighters. At 1330, Körner was forced to take to his parachute and was promptly captured by enemy ground forces to remain a prisoner of war in Canada until 1947.

His victor was South African ace Lieutenant Lawrence Waugh (6 confirmed, 2 probable and 4 damaged victories) of 1 SAAF Squadron. While interned in Canada, Körner was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 6 September 1942 for his achievements in the desert. Following his release from captivity, Körner fulfilled many important roles in the post-war Bundesluftwaffe. Körner retired from military service on 30 June 1979. At the time of his retirement, Körner held the rank of Generalmajor. Körner lived in Paris with his wife in retirement. He passed away on 3 September 1998.

Friedrich Körner was credited with 36 victories in approximately 250 missions. All his victories were recorded over North Africa.

Asisbiz database list of aerial victories for Friedrich Körner

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location Comments
1 12.10.1941 9:34 P-40 2./JG 27 SE Sollum Tomahawk of 112 Sqn RAF
2 20.10.1941 9:45 2./JG 27 100km N Marsa Luccech Blenheim of 55 Sqn, RAF
3 10.12.1941 14:03 Boston 2./JG 27 15km E Bir Hacheim Boston of 24 Sqn, SAAF
4 28.12.1941 8:55 2./JG 27 NE El Hasseiat  
5 11.1.1942 12:50 P-40 2./JG 27 N Marsa-el-Brega Kittyhawk of 3 Sqn, RAAF
6 13.1.1942 14:35 P-40 2./JG 27 Antelat Kittyhawk of 3 Sqn, RAAF flown by F/O Shaeffer
7 7.2.1942 14:27 2./JG 27 NE Derna  
8 8.2.1942 14:27 P-40 2./JG 27 Bomba Bay Kittyhawk of 112 Sqn, RAF
9 9.3.1942 16:50 Albacore 2./JG 27 SW Sidi Barrani Albacore of 826 Sqn, RN
10 19.3.1942 10:35 P-40 2./JG 27 N Gambut Kittyhawk of 80 Sqn, RAF JG27’s 1,000th victory
11 20.3.1942 8:08 P-40 2./JG 27 S Martuba Kittyhawk of 260 Sqn, RAF flown by Sgt Tregear
12 20.3.1942 8:08 P-40 2./JG 27 S Ain-el-Gazala Kittyhawk of 260 Sqn, RAF
13 21.3.1942 8:55 Boston 2./JG 27 SE Bir Hacheim Boston of 24 Sqn, SAAF
14 2.4.1942 14:28 2./JG 27 N Gambut Hurricane of 238 Sqn, RAF
15 27.5.1942 15:30 P-40 2./JG 27 S Gambut Kittyhawk of 3 Sqn, RAAF flown by Sgt Thomas
16 29.5.1942 7:52 P-40 2./JG 27 W Tobruk Kittyhawk of 250 Sqn, RAF
17 13.6.1942 6:40 P-40 2./JG 27 S Fort Acroma Hurricane of 213 Sqn, RAF
18 13.6.1942 6:50 2./JG 27 N Wadi Es Sahaae Hurricane of 213 Sqn, RAF
19 13.6.1942 6:53 P-40 2./JG 27 Tobruk  
20 14.6.1942 11:05 P-40 2./JG 27 N Gambut Tomahawk of 5 Sqn, SAAF
21 14.6.1942 11:10 P-40 2./JG 27 N Gambut Tomahawk of 5 Sqn, SAAF
22 14.6.1942 17:05 2./JG 27 NNE Derna Beaufighter of 272 Sqn, RAF
23 16.6.1942 15:20 P-40 2./JG 27 E El Adem  
24 16.6.1942 18:50 P-40 2./JG 27 SW Gambut Kittyhawk of 250 Sqn, RAF flown by P/O Cable
25 17.6.1942 8:50 P-40 2./JG 27 E Sidi Rezegh Kittyhawk of 450 Sqn, RAF
26 26.6.1942 11:48 P-40 2./JG 27 W Marsa Matruh  
27 26.6.1942 12:18 P-40 2./JG 27 W Marsa Matruh  
28 26.6.1942 18:42 P-40 2./JG 27 S Marsa Matruh  
29 26.6.1942 18:46 2./JG 27 Marsa Matruh Spitfire V of 145 Sqn RAF
30 26.6.1942 19:05 2./JG 27 SE Marsa Matruh Spitfire V of 145 Sqn RAF
31 1.7.1942 19:01 P-40 2./JG 27 W Burg-el-Arab  
32 1.7.1942 19:03 P-40 2./JG 27 W Burg-el-Arab  
33 1.7.1942 19:11 P-40 2./JG 27 W Burg-el-Arab  
34 2.7.1942 18:15 P-40 2./JG 27 El Alamein Kittyhawk of 2 Sqn, SAAF
35 2.7.1942 18:20 P-40 2./JG 27 Burg-el-Arab Kittyhawk of 2 Sqn, SAAF
36 3.7.1942 15:11 2./JG 27 SE El Alamein Hurricane of 213 Sqn, RAF

Victories : 36
Awards : Ehrenpokal (10 August 1942); Deutsches Kreuz in Gold (21 August 1942); Ritterkreuz (6 September 1943)
Units : JG 27

Web Reference: http://www.luftwaffe.cz/korner.html

Asisbiz List of 36 aerial victories for Friedrich Körner

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
12-Oct-41 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 6500m 09.54 SE Sollum
20-Oct-41 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 Blenheim IV   09.45 100km N Marsa Luccech
10-Dec-41 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 A-20 Boston III   14.03 15km E Bir Hacheim
28-Dec-41 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 Hurricane I 100-150m 08.55 NE El Hasseiat
11-Jan-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk Low Level 12.50 N Marsa-el-Brega
13-Jan-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.35 Antelat
07-Feb-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 Low Level (Rhodes) 14.27 NE Derna
08-Feb-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 8000m 14.27 Bomba-Bucht
11-Feb-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.50  
20-Feb-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.03 S Martuba
20-Feb-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.08 S Ain-el-Gazala
09-Mar-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 Albacore   16.50 SW Sidi Barrani
19-Mar-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 2000m 10.35 N Gambut
20-Mar-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 500m 08.08 S. Ain-el-Gazala
20-Mar-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 5200m 08.03 S. Martuba
21-Mar-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 A-20 Boston III 7500m 08.55 SE Bir Hacheim
02-Apr-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 5000m 14.28 North of Gambut
27-May-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk Low Level 15.30 South of Gambut
29-May-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.52 West of Tobruk
13-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   06.53 Tobruk
13-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 1000-600m 06.40 S Fort Acroma
13-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 7300m 06.50 North of Wadi-Es-Sahaae
14-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 2900m 11.10 N Gambut
14-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 7000m 17.05 NNE Derna
14-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 5000m 11.05 N Gambut
16-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 5500m 15.20 East of El Adem
16-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.50 SW Gambut
17-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.50 East of Sidi Rezegh
26-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 7200m 18.42 S Marsa Matruh
26-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 6500m 18.46 Marsa Matruh
26-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 1000m 12.18 West of Marsa Matruh
26-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 6000m 11.48 West of Marsa Matruh
26-Jun-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 Spitfire V 5500m 19.05 SE Marsa Matruh
01-Jul-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 7500m 19.01 West of Burg-el-Arab
01-Jul-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 5000m 19.03 West of Burg-el-Arab
01-Jul-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 4000m 19.11 West of Burg-el-Arab
02-Jul-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 8000m 18.15 El-Alamein
02-Jul-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.20 Burg-el-Arab
03-Jul-42 Friedrich Korner 2./JG27   15.11 SE El-Alamein



Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt

Hans-Arnold "Fiffi" Stahlschmidt was born on 15 September 1920 at Kreuztal in the Siegen region of Westfalen. He began his military career at Salzwedel where he completed his basic flying training. He attended the pilots' school in Breslau and the war school in Vienna-Schwechat. On completion of his training he was posted to JG 27. Oberfähnrich Stahlschmidt was assigned to 2./JG 27. In the spring of 1941, JG 27 was transferred to Africa. He claimed his first victory, a RAF Hurricane over Tobruk, on 15 June. On 20 November, Stahlschmidt claimed three SAAF Maryland bombers shot down to record his 2nd through 4th victories. On 21 February, he was shot down, making a crash-landing in no-man's land, following aerial combat with theofHe was rescued by a German reconnaisance patrol.

On 27 February 1942, he was shot down while attacking a column of enemy vehicles. He force-landed his damaged Bf 109 F-4/Trop (W.Nr. 8497) when his engine cut, ramming a truck. He was captured by Polish troops who beat him with rifle butts and kicked him. His decorations were removed and he was made to run the gauntlet of the column. He was interrogated before being sent to another camp. He managed to escape the following night and hiked the 60km back to his own lines in 16 hours. He was awarded the Deutsches Kreuz on 20 April 1942.

On 7 May, Stahlschmidt attacked a formation of RAF fighters. He had reached an advantageous position behind a Kittyhawk when one of his guns exploded forcing his disengagement from the combat. He crash-landed his aircraft in Axis territory near Tmimi where his aircraft burned out. Stahlschmidt claimed four victories on 26 June to record his 14th through 17th victories. On 1 July 1942, Stahlschmidt was appointed Staffelkapitän of 2./JG 27. He gained 26 victories in July 1942, including four victories on 4 July (23-26), and three on 10 July (31-33), 22 July (38-40) and 27 July (41-43). Leutnant Stahlschmidt was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 20 August 1942 for 48(47?) victories. On 3 September, he recorded five victories to take his tally from 52 to 56.

On 7 September 1942, Stahlschmidt was part of a Schwarm that had taken off on a freie Jagd. Southeast of El Alamein they came under attack by RAF Spitfires. Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt failed to return in his Bf 109 F-4 (W.Nr. 8704) "Red 4". It is possible he was the victim of the American ace John Curry (7.333 confirmed, 2 probable and 3 damaged victories) flying with 601 Sqn, RAF. Stahlschmidt was awarded the Eichenlaub (Nr. 365) and promoted to the rank of Oberleutnant posthumously on 3 January 1944.

Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt shot down 59 enemy aircraft in over 400 combat missions. All his victories were recorded in the North African theatre.

Asisbiz List of aerial victories for Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt

No Date Time A/c Type Unit location Comments
1. 15.6.1941 11:40 2./JG 27 Sollum Hurricane of 73 Sqn, RAF
2. 20.11.1941 12:20 Martin 167 2./JG 27 SE Tobruk Maryland of 21 Sqn SAAF
3. 20.11.1941 12:25 Martin 167 2./JG 27 SE Tobruk Maryland of 21 Sqn SAAF
4. 20.11.1941 12:30 Martin 167 2./JG 27 SE Tobruk Maryland of 21 Sqn SAAF
5. 27.11.1941 16:20 2./JG 27 S El Adem  
6. 14.12.1941 11:20 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 S Tmimi   
7. 11.1.1942 12:48 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 NE Agedabia Kittyhawk of 3 Sqn, RAAF
8. 22.1.1942 12:50 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 E Gtafia Kittyhawk of 3 Sqn, RAAF
9. 22.5.1942 7:50 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 SW Tmimi Kittyhawk of 112 or 250 sqn, RAF
10. 29.5.1942 7:49 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 N Fort Acroma Kittyhawk of 450 Sqn, RAF
11. 13.6.1942 6:52 2./JG 27 Tobruk Hurricane of 213 Sqn, RAF
12. 14.6.1942 11:08 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 NNW Gambut Tomahawk of 5 Sqn, SAAF
13. 16.6.1942 15:25 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 SW Gambut  
14. 26.6.1942 12:20 2./JG 27 SW Marsa Matruh  
15. 26.6.1942 12:27 2./JG 27 15km SW Marsa Matruh  
16. 26.6.1942 12:30 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 W Marsa Matruh  
17. 26.6.1942 19:06 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 SSW Marsa Matruh  
18. 27.6.1942 13:05 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 10km SE Fuka  
19. 2.7.1942 6:25 2./JG 27 N Fuka Beaufighter of 252 Sqn, RAF
20. 2.7.1942 18:23 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 Burg el Arab Kittyhawk of 2 Sqn, SAAF
21. 3.7.1942 15:09 2./JG 27 SE El Alamein Hurricane of 213 Sqn, RAF
22. 3.7.1942 15:15 2./JG 27 E El Alamein  
23. 4.7.1942 6:30 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 El Alamein  
24. 4.7.1942 6:32 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 SE El Alamein  
25. 4.7.1942 8:25 2./JG 27 El Alamein Hurricane of 213 Sqn, RAF
26. 4.7.1942 17:05 2./JG 27 SW Burg-el-Arab Hurricane of 1 Sqn, SAAF
27. 7.7.1942 6:02 Gladiator 2./JG 27 10km NE El Daba Albacore of 826 Sqn, RN or Italian CR 42 in error
28. 8.7.1942 10:32 2./JG 27 SE El Alamein Hurricane IIC of 33 Sqn, RAF
29. 8.7.1942 10:35 2./JG 27 S Burg-el-Arab  Hurricane IIC of 33 Sqn, RAF
30. 8.7.1942 10:40 2./JG 27 SE Burg-el-Arab  Hurricane IIC of 33 Sqn, RAF
31. 10.7.1942 13:25 2./JG 27 N El Alamein  Hurricane of 80, 92 or 127 Sqn, RAF
32. 10.7.1942 13:33 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 W El Alamein  Hurricane of 80, 92 or 127 Sqn, RAF
33. 10.7.1942 13:35 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 E El Alamein  Hurricane of 80, 92 or 127 Sqn, RAF
34. 11.7.1942 16:10 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 SW El Alamein Tomahawk or Kittyhawk of 2 or 5 Sqn, SAAF
35. 14.7.1942 18:29 2./JG 27 El Alamein  
36. 16.7.1942 10:15 2./JG 27 SE El Alamein  
37. 17.7.1942 13:25 2./JG 27 SW El Alamein Hurricane of 92 or 238 Sqn, RAF
38. 22.7.1942 8:25 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 W El Alamein Kittyhawk of 112 Sqn, RAF flown by P/O Barrow, killed
39. 22.7.1942 8:40 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 SW El Alamein Kittyhawk of 4 Sqn, SAAF
40. 22.7.1942 12:00 2./JG 27 S El Alamein Hurricane of 73 Sqn, RAF
41. 27.7.1942 12:26 2./JG 27 S El Hammam Hurricane of 33 or 213 Sqn, RAF
42. 27.7.1942 17:30 2./JG 27 SW El Alamein Hurricane of 1 Sqn, SAAF
43. 27.7.1942 17:42 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 W El Alamein  Kittyhawk of 3 Sqn, RAAF or 450 Sqn, RAF
44. 1.8.1942 16:40 2./JG 27 W El Alamein Hurricane of 80 Sqn, RAF
45. 1.8.1942 16:45 2./JG 27 WEl Alamein Hurricane of 80 Sqn, RAF
46. 16.8.1942 8:15 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 NW El Hammam Tomahawk of 5 Sqn, SAAF flown by Lt Trenchard, POW
47. 16.8.1942 8:25 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 WSW El Alamein Tomahawk of 5 Sqn, SAAF
48. 23.8.1942 8:03 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 S El Hammam Kittyhawk of 3 Sqn, RAAF or 450 Sqn, RAF
49. 1.9.1942 17:48 2./JG 27 SE El Alamein Hurricane of 213 Sqn, RAF
50. 1.9.1942 17:50 2./JG 27 SE El Alamein  
51. 2.9.1942 16:12 P-46 2./JG 27 SW El Hammam Hurricane of 274 Sqn, RAF
52. 3.9.1942 7:22 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 SW El Hammam  
53. 3.9.1942 7:24 2./JG 27 SW El Hammam  
54. 3.9.1942 7:29 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 SW El Hammam  
55. 3.9.1942 15:12 2./JG 27 SW Imayid Hurricane of 7 Sqn, SAAF
56. 3.9.1942 15:26 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 S Imayid  
57. 5.9.1942 10:49 2./JG 27 SW Ilmayid  
58. 5.9.1942 10:52 P-46 2./JG 27 SE Ilmayid  
59. 6.9.1942 17:25 Curtiss P-40 2./JG 27 SE El Hammam  

Victories : 59
Awards : Knight`s Cross with Oak Leaves
Units : JG 27

Web Reference: http://www.luftwaffe.cz/stahlschmidt.html

Asisbiz database list of 61 aerial victories for Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
Sunday, June 15, 1941 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   11:40 Sollum
Thursday, November 20, 1941 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt Stab I./JG27 Martin 167   12:20 SE Tobruk
Thursday, November 20, 1941 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt Stab I./JG27 Martin 167   12:25 SE Tobruk
Thursday, November 20, 1941 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt Stab I./JG27 Martin 167   12:30 SE Tobruk
Thursday, November 27, 1941 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt Stab I./JG27   16:20 S El Adem
Sunday, December 14, 1941 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11:20 South of Tmimi
Sunday, January 11, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12:48 NE Agedabia
Thursday, January 22, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12:50 East of Gtafia
Wednesday, February 11, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12:48  
Friday, May 22, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 1800m 07:50 SW Tmimi
Friday, May 29, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07:49 North of Fort Acroma
Saturday, June 13, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 4000m 06:52 Tobruk
Sunday, June 14, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11:08 NNW Gambut
Tuesday, June 16, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   15:25 SW Gambut
Friday, June 26, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12:20 SW Marsa Matruh
Friday, June 26, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   12:30 West of Mersa Matruh
Friday, June 26, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   19:06 SSW Marsa Matruh
Friday, June 26, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   12:27 15km SW Marsa Matruh
Saturday, June 27, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   13:05 10km SE Fuka
Thursday, July 02, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   06:25 North of Fuka
Thursday, July 02, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18:23 Burg-el-Arab
Friday, July 03, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   15:15 E El-Alamein
Friday, July 03, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   15:09 SE El-Alamein
Saturday, July 04, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   06:30 E El-Alamein
Saturday, July 04, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   06:32 SE El-Alamein
Saturday, July 04, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   08:25 El-Alamein
Saturday, July 04, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   17:05 SW Burg-el-Arab
Tuesday, July 07, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 Gladiator   06:02 10km NE El Daba
Wednesday, July 08, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   10:35 South of Burg-el-Arab
Wednesday, July 08, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   10:40 SE Burg-el-Arab
Wednesday, July 08, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   10:32 SE El-Alamein
Friday, July 10, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   13:25 N El-Alamein
Friday, July 10, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13:33 West of El-Alamein
Friday, July 10, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13:35 E El-Alamein
Saturday, July 11, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16:10 SW El-Alamein
Tuesday, July 14, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 1800m 18:29 El-Alamein
Wednesday, July 15, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   - 17km W. El Hammam
Thursday, July 16, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   10:15 SE El-Alamein
Friday, July 17, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   13:25 SW El-Alamein
Wednesday, July 22, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08:40 SW El-Alamein
Wednesday, July 22, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   12:00 S El-Alamein
Wednesday, July 22, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08:25 West of El-Alamein
Monday, July 27, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 9000m 17:30 SW El-Alamein
Monday, July 27, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   12:26 S El-Hammam
Monday, July 27, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17:42 W. El-Alamein
Saturday, August 01, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 2500m 16:45 West of El-Alamein
Saturday, August 01, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 1500m 16:40 West of El-Alamein
Sunday, August 16, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08:25 WSW El-Alamein
Sunday, August 16, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08:15 NW El-Hammam
Sunday, August 23, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08:03 South of El-Hammam
Tuesday, September 01, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   17:50 SE EL-Alamein
Tuesday, September 01, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   17:48 SE El-Alamein
Wednesday, September 02, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16:12 SW El-Hammam
Thursday, September 03, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   15:26 South of El-Imayid
Thursday, September 03, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   15:12 SW El-Imayid
Thursday, September 03, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07:29 SW El-Hammam
Thursday, September 03, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   07:24 SW El-Hammam
Thursday, September 03, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07:22 SW El-Hammam
Saturday, September 05, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 Curtiss P-46   10:52 SE El-Imayid
Saturday, September 05, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27   10:49 SW El-Imayid
Sunday, September 06, 1942 Hans-Arnold Stahlschmidt 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17:25 SE El-Hammam



Gerhard Homuth

On 6 October 1939, Homuth was appointed Adjutant of I./JG27. He was appointed Staffelkapitän of 3./JG27 on 1 February 1940. He gained his first victory on 11 May, when he shot down a RAF Blenheim twin-engine bomber over Diest-Schaffen. By the end of the French campaign, Homuth had nine victories to his credit. He was add a further six victories during the Battle of Britain. In spring 1941, I./JG27 was relocated to North Africa. Homuth was to be particularly successful in this theatre. Oberleutnant Homuth was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 14 June for 22 victories.

On 9 January 1942, Homuth shot down two RAF P-40 fighters, one near Marsa el Brega and another near Gadd el Ahmar for his 38th and 39th victories. It would appear the first of his two victories this day was the Australian ace, Sgt Ron Simes (5 destroyed, 1 probable and 1 damaged victories) of 3Sqn, RAAF, who was killed in the engagement. He recorded his 40th victory on 9 February, when he shot down a RAF Hurricane near El Adem. Homuth was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of I./JG27 on 8 June 1942. He recorded three victories on 27 July (50-52), all RAF Hurricane fighters near El Hammam, and his 60th on 27 October, when he shot down a RAF Spitfire fighter near Bir Mumim Busak. With the withdrawal of I./JG27 from North Africa, Homuth fell ill. In February 1943, he was assigned to the Luftwaffe delegation based at Sofia in Bulgaria as an instructor training Bulgarian fighter pilots.

Homuth returned to front line duty on 29 July 1943 as Gruppenkommandeur of I./JG54 based on the Eastern front He took off on a combat mission together with his wingman Oblt. Otto Vinzent in the vicinity of Kursk on August 2(other sources 3rd), 1943. About 20 km to the south of Kromy, Flying Fw-190A-6 (W.Nr. 550436) '<<+' Homuth and Vinzent were engaged by a composite formation of Airacobras, P-40s and La-5s. Following a 20-minute dogfight, Oblt. Vinzent lost sight of Homuth, and returned to base alone. Homuth was listed as missing and still is to this day.

Gerhard Homuth was credited with 63 victories in approximately 450 missions. He recorded two victories over the Eastern front.

Asisbiz database list of 63 aerial victories for Gerhard Homuth

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location Comments
1 11.5.1940 17:30 3./JG27 Diest-Schaffen -
2 12.5.1940 6:20 3./JG27 Luttich -
3 19.5.1940 16:30 3./JG27 N Albert Hurricane (N2598) of 145 Sqn, RAF flown by P/O KR Lucas, killed
4 25.5.1940 12:30 3./JG27 W Calais -
5 2.6.1940 9:20 3./JG27 5km SW Dunkirk -
6 2.6.1940 9:25 3./JG27 SW Dunkirk -
7 5.6.1940 18:15 Morane 3./JG27 Beauvais -
8 5.6.1940 18:20 Morane 3./JG27 3km SE Froissy -
9 13.6.1940 20:15 Bloch 131 3./JG27 Lechelle -
10 20.7.1940 14:25 3./JG27 W Swanage -
11 20.7.1940 14:28 3./JG27 W Swanage -
12 12.8.1940 12:50 3./JG27 Bembridge -
13 3.9.1940 11:35 3./JG27 Burnham -
14 11.9.1940 18:10 3./JG27 5km SW Selsey Bill -
15 30.9.1940 18:10 3./JG27 S Eastbourne -
16 1.5.1941 9:15 3./JG27 20km S Tobruk Hurricane of 274 Sqn, RAF
17 1.5.1941 9:20 3./JG27 Tobruk Hurricane of 274 Sqn, RAF
18 5.5.1941 8:32 Martin 167 3./JG27 10km ESE Acroma Maryland of 39 Sqn, RAF
19 8.5.1941 10:10 3./JG27 100km ENE Tobruk Maryland of 39 Sqn, RAF
20 15.5.1941 12:15 3./JG27 Sollum Hurricane (V7829) of 274 Sqn, RAF flown by Sgt FH Dean
21 21.5.1941 7:57 3./JG27 SE Capuzzo Blenheim IV of 14 Sqn, RAF
22 21.5.1941 7:58 3./JG27 SE Capuzzo Blenheim IV of 14 Sqn, RAF
23 30.8.1941 17:30 3./JG27 Sollum -
24 14.9.1941 17:45 Martin 167 3./JG27 S El Sofafi Maryland of 24 Sqn, SAAF
25 14.9.1941 17:48 3./JG27 S El Sofafi Hurricane of 33 Sqn, RAF
26 24.9.1941 14:40 P-40 3./JG27 Sidi Omar Tomahawk of 112 Sqn, RAF
27 24.9.1941 16:47 3./JG27 Buq Buq Hurricane of 1 Sqn, SAAF or RNFU
28 27.9.1941 10:10 3./JG27 5km SE Ras Azaz Tomahawk of 112 Sqn, RAF
29 5.12.1941 15:35 3./JG27 - Hurricane of 274 Sqn, RAF
30 9.12.1941 14:15 P-40 3./JG27 S Gambut Tomahawk IIb of 3 Sqn, RAAF
31 13.12.1941 16:15 P-40 3./JG27 SW Tmimi Tomahawk of 1 Sqn, SAAF
32 23.12.1941 14:00 3./JG27 SE Arco Philaenorum Beaufighter of 272 Sqn, RAF flown by F/O Baker
33 23.12.1941 14:00 3./JG27 SE Arco Philaenorum Beaufighter of 272 Sqn, RAF flown by F/O Lee
34 3.1.1942 8:20 P-40 3./JG27 NE Agedabia Hurricane of 208 Sqn, RAF flown by 2/Lt JS Iddeson
35 7.1.1942 12:15 P-40 3./JG27 NE Agedabia Tomahawk of 2 or 4 Sqn, SAAF
36 7.1.1942 12:20 P-40 3./JG27 30km NE Agedabia Tomahawk of 2 or 4 Sqn, SAAF
37 9.1.1942 14:15 P-40 3./JG27 Marsa el Brega Kittyhawk I (AK610) of 3 Sqn, RAAF flown by Sgt RH Simes (5/1/1 victories), killed
38 9.1.1942 14:20 P-40 3./JG27 10km N Gadd el Ahmar Kittyhawk I (AK581) of 3 Sqn, RAAF flown by G Chinchen
39 8.2.1942 14:32 P-40 3./JG27 E Bomba Bucht Kittyhawk of 112 Sqn, RAF
40 9.2.1942 10:51 3./JG27 S El Adem Hurricane of 73 Sqn, RAF
41 21.2.1942 12:11 P-40 3./JG27 20km SE Ain el Gazala Kittyhawk of 112 Sqn, RAF
42 27.2.1942 12:10 P-40 3./JG27 NE Fort Acroma Kittyhawk of 450 Sqn, RAF flown by Sgt EJ Gray, killed
43 2.3.1942 10:51 P-40 3./JG27 W Tobruk Hurricane of 274 Sqn, RAF
44 2.3.1942 10:52 P-40 3./JG27 SE Fort Acroma Hurricane of 274 Sqn, RAF
45 2.4.1942 18:07 P-40 3./JG27 30km N Fort Acroma Hurricane of 80 Sqn, RAF
46 6.4.1942 9:10 3./JG27 NW Tmimi Hurricane of 40 Sqn, SAAF flown by Lt Egner, baled out
47 7.4.1942 8:37 P-46 3./JG27 SW Ain el Gazala Tomahawk of 260 Sqn, RAF flown by Sgt Alexander, killed
48 23.5.1942 11:18 Boston 3./JG27 N Acroma Baltimore of 223 Sqn, RAF
49 25.7.1942 17:45 Stab I./JG27 W El Daba -
50 27.7.1942 12:25 Stab I./JG27 SE El Hammam Hurricane of 33 or 213 Sqn, RAF
51 27.7.1942 12:27 Stab I./JG27 SE El Hammam Hurricane of 33 or 213 Sqn, RAF
52 27.7.1942 12:28 Stab I./JG27 5km S El Hammam Hurricane of 33 or 213 Sqn, RAF
53 7.8.1942 9:35 Stab I./JG27 NNW El Alamein Hurricane of 274 Sqn, RAF
54 7.8.1942 9:37 P-40 Stab I./JG27 Near Ras Gibeira Hurricane of 274 Sqn, RAF
55 18.8.1942 9:38 P-40 Stab I./JG27 W El Alamein Kittyhawk of 260 Sqn, RAF flown by P/O Maclean
56 29.8.1942 8:45 P-40 Stab I./JG27 15km SE Abu Dweis Kittyhawk of 450 Sqn, RAF
57 2.9.1942 16:10 P-46 Stab I./JG27 SW El Hammam Hurricane of 274 Sqn, RAF
58 7.9.1942 17:42 P-40 Stab I./JG27 SE El Alamein -
59 15.9.1942 16:54 P-40 Stab I./JG27 SW El Alamein -
60 27.10.1942 15:15 Stab I./JG27 Bir Mumim Busak -
61 2.11.1942 12:06 P-46 Stab I./JG27 SE Mumin Busak Hurricane of 33 or 238 Sqn, RAF
62 VIII.43 - E/a Stab I./JG54 - -
63 2.8.1943 - Airacobra Stab I./JG54 S Kromy -

Victories : 63
Awards : Deutsches Kreuz in Gold (9 April 1942)
Ritterkreuz (14 June 1941)
Units : LG 2, JG27, JG54

Website Reference: http://www.luftwaffe.cz/homuth.htm

Asisbiz database list of 63 aerial victories for Gerhard Homuth

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
11-May-40 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27   17.30 Diest-Schaffen
12-May-40 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27   06.20 Luttich
19-May-40 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27   16.30 North of Albert
25-May-40 Gerhard Homuth 2./JG27   12.30 West of Calais
02-Jun-40 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 4500m 09.20 SW Dunkirk
02-Jun-40 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27   09.20 5km SW Dunkirk
02-Jun-40 Gerhard Homuth 2./JG27   09.25 Western Front
05-Jun-40 Gerhard Homuth 2./JG27 Morane 406   18.15 Beauvais
05-Jun-40 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Morane 406 500m 18.20 3km SE Froissy
05-Jun-40 Gerhard Homuth 2./JG27 Morane   18.20 5km SE Froissy
13-Jun-40 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Bloch 131   20.15 Lechelle
20-Jul-40 Gerhard Homuth 2./JG27   14.25 West of Swanage
20-Jul-40 Gerhard Homuth 2./JG27   14.28 West of Swanage
12-Aug-40 Gerhard Homuth 2./JG27   12.50 Bembridge
03-Sep-40 Gerhard Homuth 2./JG27   11.35 Burnham-on-Sea
11-Sep-40 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 6000m 18.10 5km sudw Selsey Bill
30-Sep-40 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27   18.10 South of Eastbourne
01-May-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Hurricane I   09.15 20km S Tobruk
01-May-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Hurricane I   09.20 Flugplatz Tobruk
05-May-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Martin 167 3000m 08.32 10km ESE Acroma
08-May-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Blenheim IV 2000m 10.10 100km ENE Tobruk
15-May-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Hurricane I   12.15 Sollum
21-May-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Blenheim IV   07.57 SE Fort Capuzzo
21-May-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Blenheim IV   07.58 SE Fort Capuzzo
30-Aug-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Blenheim I   17.30 Sollum
14-Sep-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Hurricane I   17.48 South of El Sofafi
14-Sep-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Martin 167   17.45 South of El Sofafi
24-Sep-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.40 Sidi Omar
24-Sep-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Hurricane I   16.47 Buq Buq
27-Sep-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Hurricane I   10.10 5km SE Ras Azaz
05-Dec-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27   15.35 North Africa
09-Dec-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.15 S Gambut
13-Dec-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.15 SW Tmimi
23-Dec-41 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27   14.00 SE Arco Philaenorum
03-Jan-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.20 NE Agedabia
07-Jan-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.15 NE Agedabia
07-Jan-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 1500m 12.20 30km NE Agedabia
09-Jan-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 4000m 14.15 Marsa-el-Brega
09-Jan-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 4500m 14.20 10km N Gadd-el- Ahmar
08-Feb-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.32 E Bomba-Bucht
09-Feb-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27   10.51 S El Adem
21-Feb-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.11 20km SE Ain-el-Gazala
27-Feb-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.10 NE Fort Acroma
02-Mar-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.51 West of Tobruk
02-Mar-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.52 SE Fort Acroma
02-Apr-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.07 30km N Fort Acroma
06-Apr-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27   09.10 NW Tmimi
07-Apr-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 Curtiss P-46   08.37 SW Ain-el-Gazala
23-May-42 Gerhard Homuth 3./JG27 A-20 Boston III   11.18 North of Fort Acroma
25-Jul-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27   17.45 West of El Daba
27-Jul-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27   12.25 SE El-Hammam
27-Jul-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27   12.27 SE El-Hammam
27-Jul-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27 500m 12.28 5km S El-Hammam
07-Aug-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27   09.35 NNW El-Alamein
07-Aug-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.37 North of El-Hammam
18-Aug-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.38 West of El-Alamein
29-Aug-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27 P-40 Kittyhawk 2000m 08.45 15km SE Abu Dweis
02-Sep-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27 Curtiss P-46   16.10 SW El-Hammam
07-Sep-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.42 SE El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27 P-40 Kittyhawk   16.54 SW El-Alamein
27-Oct-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27   15.15 Bir Mumin Busak
02-Nov-42 Gerhard Homuth Stab I./JG27 Curtiss P-46   12.06 SE Mumin Busak



Albert Espenlaub
The Fate of Ofw. Albert Espenlaub

Anyone who has visited the war graves managed today by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, will not be surprised to learn that some cemeteries contain headstones commemorating German soldiers. At Rameleh, about 20 km from Jerusalem, there is a cemetery which, as well as being the final resting place for several hundred Commonweath soldiers killed during the First and Second World Wars, also contains the remains of Luftwaffe pilot Albert Espenlaub. Several historians have stated, incorrectly, that Espenlaub was killed in aerial combat, or mention only that he made an emergency landing; invariably they fail to explain that today he lies in the War Graves cemetery at Rameleh. This is his story.

Albert Espenlaub was born on 25 August 1913 in Balzholt, today part of Beuren, in Baden Wurttemberg, about 40 km south of Stuttgart. The Espenlaub family was already connected with aviation and, indeed, Albert's older brother, Gottlob, born 13 years earlier, had grown up with a fascination for aeronautics which, in 1919, resulted in him being involved in the first of the R6hn glider trials on the Wasserkuppe. Later, Gottlob began building his own aircraft and gained world-wide fame in aviation circles for various feats which included making the first flight in a rocket-powered aircraft. Eventually, Gottlob launched his own company, EspenlaubFlugzeugbau which, after a modest beginning, quickly grew with premises successively located in Kassel, Goslar and later in Diisseldorf where the company was then completing aircraft at the rate of one per day. In 1939, the company moved to Wuppertal but, with the outbreak of war and the construction of private aircraft becoming more difficult, EspenlaubFlugzeugbau was engaged in the repair of ]u 87s and various fighter aircraft. Later, branches of the company were created at Riga in Latvia, and at Reval in Estonia, by which time the company employed about 3,000 workers.

To the great disappointment of Gottlob, who offered his brother a good position in his company, Albert was determined to become a Jagdflieger and entered the Wehrmacht in 1937. With his flying-training completed, at the end of 1940 Albert Espenlaub was transferred as an Unteroffizier to I./JG27, then under the command of Oblt. Wolfgang Redlich Espenlaub claimed his first victory, a Hurricane near Tobruk, on 21 April 1941; the second day his Staffel was in action il1NorthAfrica, but in spite of his outstanding abilities as a pilot, claimed no more victories until November. By 15 November, he gad made three claims and on that day claimed his fourth, again a Hurricane, and ended the month with a total of 12 victories including three'on the 23rd. On7 December he shot down a P-40 and on the 11th, a Blenheim. This was to be his last victory for, twO days later, he was himself shot down. His Staffelfuhrer, Oblt. Hugo Schneider, described what happened in the following letter, addressed to Espenlaub family, and dated 1 ]anuary1942:

December, we had a fight with English Hurricanes over enemy territory. Your son, who had already claimed 14 victories, dived too soon towards one enemy aircraft and received hits in the cooling system of his aircraft's engine. His comrades immediately drew the attention of the English on themselves in order to allow Albert and his damaged aircraft to leave the danger area and find protection in the clouds. He was last seen flying into such a cloud.

After a hit in the cooling system, the engine only runs five more minutes, after which one must land. I am certain that Albert made an emergency landing and was taken prisoner by the English who always treat captured airmen correctly and fairly. However, we are waiting for confirmation of this and although there is still a chance that he might be able to reach our lines and return to his unit, for the time being we must consider him missing in action. Should we receive any information from the English, I will inform you immediately. I am sorry that Albert is no longer with the Staffel, not only because he was our best fighter pilot, but also because I felt very close to him as a personal friend who taught me a lot.

In fact, Hugo Schneider was correct in believing that his friend was alive and in captivity, although he was probably never certain of this as he was himself killed in combat with a P-40 on 11 January. The same day, Ofw. Albert Espenlaub wrote his parents a one-page letter from Cage No. 14, Prisoner of War Camp No. 321, which induded the following lines:
'Dear Parents!
By now, the reason for my long silence will be clear to you. On 13 December I had to make a belly-landing and I am now a prisoner of the English. My health is pretty good and I hope that this is also the case with you. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to be home for Christmas as I had hoped and I must say how sorry I was about this.'

In due course, the Espenlaub family received another letter, this time from the German Red Cross, which read:
'[. ..] Via the Spanish consul in Jerusalem and the Spanish Foreign Ministry, which contacted the German Embassy in Madrid, we have learned that a representative of the British armed forces has advised the Spanish authorities that in the early morning of 25 February 1942, Oberfeldwebel Albert Espenlaub was shot by guards while attempting to escape from a PoW camp. One shot was fired which killed him instantly. [. . .]'

Also in the PoW camp at that time was Otto Berchner, one of Albert Espenlaub's contemporaries who had flown with 7./ZG26 and who knew Espenlaub. Berchner was later transferred to Canada in August 1942 and, many years after the war, he visited cemetery near the camp and discovered Espenlaub's grave recalled:
 
'In early 1942, there were about 25-30 officers an equivalent number of other ranks in the camp situated about 12 km from Jerusalem. Most of the Pow's were members of the Afrika Korps but there were also, like me, members of the Luftwaffe who had been shot down and captured. The morale among us prisoners varied greatly. There were those who realised that the Allies outnumbered the Afrika Korps and no longer believed in a German victory. On the other hand, there were several others who still wanted to fight again, and it was not unusual to hear men discussing the possibility of escaping and reaching our lines. Personally, I never heard Espenlaub speak about his plans, but during the night of 24-25 February, while we were asleep he slipped out of our barracks and succeeded in getting over the first barbed-wire but, as he was attempting to get over the second one, he was discovered by a guard who opened fire. We were awoken by the sound of the shot and saw the tragic scene. Later; we were told that the guard responsible - a jew - had been court-martialled. Espenlaub was not the only German shot in this camp and I can recall at least two others.'

As a final postscript, it should be mentioned that although Espenlaub was probably not aware of it, in Germany a young woman was expecting his child. Whether knowledge of this would have deterred him from risking his life in his escape attempt or made him even more determined to return is not known, but in due course the woman gave birth to a son, whom she named Albert, after his father. He lives today, in Australia.

Asisbiz Database of 14 aerial victories for Albert Espenlaub

Date Pilot Name Unit EA Type Height Time Location
21-Apr-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27     Tobruk
02-Aug-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.57 40km NW Marsa Matruh
21-Aug-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 Martin 167   18.07 Sidi Barrani
15-Nov-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27   09.30 North Africa
18-Nov-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 Martin 167     East of Bir Hacheim
20-Nov-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.20 South of Bir-el-Gobi
22-Nov-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 Blenheim IV   14.06 NW Bir-el-Gobi
23-Nov-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 A-20 Boston     SE El Adem
23-Nov-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.45 Bir-el-Gobi
23-Nov-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08.40 S Bir-el-Gobi
24-Nov-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 A-20 Boston   09.35 South of Ain-el-Gazala
25-Nov-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.05 SE Tobruk
07-Dec-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.55 SE El Adem
11-Dec-41 Albert Espenlaub 1./JG27 Blenheim IV   11.45 Bomba Bucht



Wolfgang Redlich

Asisbiz Database of 37 aerial victories for Wolfgang Redlich

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
11-May-40 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 Fairey Battle   07.40 Tongeren
16-May-40 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27     Charleroi
29-May-40 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27     Dunkirk
02-Jun-40 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27     West of Dunkirk
05-Jun-40 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 Morane 406   18.20 Foret de Compiegne
13-Jun-40 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 Fairey Battle   16.30 Provins
13-Jun-40 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 Fairey Battle   20.05 Montmirail
07-Sep-40 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   18.55 SE London
09-Sep-40 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   18.35 South of London
27-Sep-40 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   10.15 Sevenoaks
19-Apr-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 Hurricane I   13.50 SE Tobruk
19-Apr-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 Hurricane I   14.00 West of Tobruk
23-Apr-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   12.55 N Tobruk
23-Apr-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   12.50 NE Tobruk
30-Apr-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   06.15 Tobruk
16-May-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   16.55 Tobruk
09-Jun-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   05.00 N Tobruk
14-Jun-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   18.45 SE Halfaya-Pass
15-Jun-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   11.40 Sollum
15-Jun-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   17.35 S Fort Capuzzo
18-Jun-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 Buffalo   06.00 E Sollum
21-Aug-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 Martin 167   17.55 West of Sidi Barrani
14-Sep-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.15 SSE Sidi Azeiz
27-Sep-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.50 SW Sidi Barrani
18-Nov-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 Martin 167   09.30  
20-Nov-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.15 Bir-el-Gobi
22-Nov-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.40 East of Bir-el-Gobi
22-Nov-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 Blenheim IV   14.00 SE Ain-el-Gazala
22-Nov-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 Blenheim IV   14.15 NE Bir Hacheim
22-Nov-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.45 SE Bir Hacheim 50 Staffelabschuss
23-Nov-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   08.35 SE El Adem
23-Nov-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   16.35 S Bir-el-Gobi
23-Nov-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27     SE El Adem
26-Nov-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.15 West of Bu Amud
01-Dec-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27   12.55 Bir-el-Gobi
05-Dec-41 Wolfgang Redlich 1./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.05 S Bir-el-Gobi
29-May-44 Wolfgang Redlich Stab I./JG27 B-24 Liberator 7000m 10.30 N Sankt-Polten



Fritz Gromotka

Units: 1./JG-27 (11/41), 6./JG-27 (6/41 S.U.), Stfkpt 9./JG-27 (2/45 to end)

Awards: RK(1/28/45), DK-G(5/25/44), EP(1/19/44), EK 1 & 2, Wound Badge, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109E-3 'Yellow 10' (1940), Bf 109E-8 WNr 4890 'Yellow 2' (lost 6/25/41-MIA), Bf 109F-4 'Yellow 8' & Bf 109F-4/Trop WNr 8548 'Yellow 4+-' (lost 5/31/42 @ Amut, cause unknown) in Staffel, Bf 109K 'Yellow 1'

Remarks: MIA (briefly) on 25 June, 1941 after being shot down near Minsk; returned OK. With JG-27 the entire war except for interruptions caused by injuries and fighter training schools. Had to bail out five times. 438 combat missions. 9 bombers. His first known Soviet victory, two DB-3's on 25 June, 1941. One known Desert victory, a Hurricane of RAF No. 208 Sq. near Tobruk on 29 November, 1941. 2 victories in the East. His 15th victory, a Beaufighter west southwest of Karpathos Greece, 10 November, 1943. His 20th, a B-17 NW of Neusiedler on 12 April, 1944. His 25th, a P-47 NE of Lisieux on 10 June, 1944. His 26th, a P-47 at Stadt Gr. Paris on 12 June, 1944. A 27th, a Typhoon S of Evreux on 17 August, 1944. A 28th, a P-47 at Mantes-Meulan on 19 August, 1944. Deceased 2 November, 1979. Photo

Asisbiz database list of 39 aerial victories for Fritz Gromotka

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
Sunday, April 13, 1941 Fritz Gromotka 6./JG27 Blenheim I   16:06 SW Bitolj-Kenali Balkans
Sunday, April 13, 1941 Fritz Gromotka 6./JG27 Blenheim I   16:09 SW Bitolj-Kenali Balkans
Monday, April 14, 1941 Fritz Gromotka 6./JG27 Gladiator      
Wednesday, June 25, 1941 Fritz Gromotka 6./JG27 DB-3   12:45  
Wednesday, June 25, 1941 Fritz Gromotka 6./JG27 DB-3   10:45  
Wednesday, October 29, 1941 Fritz Gromotka 6./JG27 Hurricane I   11:32  
Saturday, November 29, 1941 Fritz Gromotka 6./JG27   14:32 SW El Adem
Monday, February 23, 1942 Fritz Gromotka 6./JG27   13:15 West of Sidi Barrani
Wednesday, March 18, 1942 Fritz Gromotka 6./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   08:30 SE Tobruk
Wednesday, June 10, 1942 Fritz Gromotka 6./JG27      
Monday, September 27, 1943 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27   15:17 NW Flugplatz Kos (Dodecanese)
Monday, September 27, 1943 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 200m 11:20 1-2km N Insel Kos
Tuesday, September 28, 1943 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 4000m 16:15 North of Gyali (Dodecanese)
Tuesday, October 05, 1943 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 B-24 Liberator 5000m 12:53 2951 Eratini (Salonika)
Friday, October 08, 1943 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 P-38 Lightning 50m 13:53 6-8km NNW Akrotiri Pappas
Wednesday, November 10, 1943 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 50m 13:40 WSW Karpathos
Saturday, December 04, 1943 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 Baltimore 2000m 08:33 Insel Kea (Aegean)
Monday, December 06, 1943 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 B-24 Liberator 7000m 11:40 NW Eleusis
Monday, December 06, 1943 Fritz Gromotka 9/JG27 B-24 Liberator     West of Milos
Sunday, March 19, 1944 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 B-24 Liberator 6500m 13:50 25km SE Marburg
Wednesday, April 12, 1944 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 B-17 Fortress 7500m 12:15 NW Neusiedler See (N Sopron)
Friday, May 12, 1944 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 B-17 Fortress Hss      
Friday, May 12, 1944 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 B-17 Fortress Hss 7000m 12:38 30km vor Hanau
Friday, May 12, 1944 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6000m 12:30 30km ENE Hanau
Sunday, May 28, 1944 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 14:30 Raum Wittenberg
Saturday, June 10, 1944 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt     NE Lisieux
Monday, June 12, 1944 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 6500m 14:05 AE-7 (Stadt Gr Paris)
Thursday, August 17, 1944 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 Typhoon 4700m 14:48 AC-12 (S. evreux)
Saturday, August 19, 1944 Fritz Gromotka 9./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 100m 08:53 UD-89 (Mantes-Meulan)



Rudolf 'Rudi' Sinner

Rudolf 'Rudi' Sinner was born in 1915 in Austria. In 1936, he was serving in the Austrian Army in the horsedrawn artillery. During the invasion of Poland, he served with an anti-aircraft artillery unit before transferring to the Luftwaffe in 1940. Sinner began his aerial combat career with JG3, based on the Western front, but was then transferred to JG27 serving in North Africa. He was assigned to 2./JG27. It was with JG27 that Sinner gained his greatest successes. He claimed his first victory on 12 October 1941, when he shot down a RAF P-40 fighter near Sidi Omar.

On 4 June 1942, Sinner was appointed Staffelkapitän of 6./JG27. On 10 June, Oberleutnant Sinner was shot down near Bir Hacheim by the British Ace, Charles Overton (5.5 confirmed, 1 probable and 0.5 damaged victories), flying a Spitfire Vb fighter ofThen, on 24 June, Sinner's aircraft was hit in the engine during combat with RAF Hurricane fighters and he was forced to make a forced-landing. On 10 July, he shot down afighter with only one of his 7.92mm MG17 machine-guns functioning. Sinner recorded his 10th victory on 13 July and his 20th on 24 July. On 31 August, Sinner shot down a Hurricane near Alam el Haifa. His victim was South African Ace, John 'Harry' Gaynor (5.5 destroyed and 6 damaged victories) of 1 Sqn, SAAF, who crash-landed unhurt. He claimed his 30th victory on 3 September. In June 1943, Hauptmann Sinner was appointed Gruppenkommandeur IV./JG27 then based at Kalamaki, Greece. However, his stay with the unit was destined to brief.

On 30 July 1943, Sinner was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of IV./JG54, based on the Russian front, taking over from Hauptmann Erich Rudorffer (224 victories, RK-S). Sinner led the Gruppe until 10 February 1944. He added three further victories to his victory total during his time with the unit. In March 1944, Hauptmann Sinner became Gruppenkommandeur of III./JG54 located on the Western front. On 6 March 1944, Sinner shot down a USAAF B-17 four-engine bomber for his 36th victory. However, his aircraft was hit by the bombers' defensive fire and Sinner was badly wounded. He successfully baled out of his stricken Bf-109G-6 (W.Nr. 410557) '2'. By 12 June 1944, Sinner was again serving with JG27, based on the Invasion front in France, in command of I.Gruppe. He was to lead the Gruppe until 1 August 1944. On 1 January 1945, Major Sinner was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of III./JG7 flying Me 262 jet fighters. At this time his victory total stood at 36, including 32 victories achieved over North Africa.

Sinner was to add three confirmed victories to his tally flying the jet, including two USAAF B-24 four-engine bombers near Rathenow on 3 March. On 4 April, Sinner led seven other Me-262s off from Rechlin. Emerging from the clouds shortly after take-off, the flight was bounced by P-51 fighters of the 339th Fighter Group, USAAF. In the ensuing combat 'Rudi' Sinner's aircraft was hit. With his face and hands badly burned, he baled out at low level. His parachute deployed at the last moment, but did not completely fill, and he was hanging by just the left strap when he hit the ground heavily in a ploughed field and dragged into a barbed wire fence. He reported that the P-51s then attempted to strafe him, but he feigned death and, as the P-51 fighters departed, he made his way to the safety of a deep furrow. Sinner's wounds were serious enough to keep him out of the rest of war.

Rudolf Sinner was credited with 39 victories in 305 missions. 36 of his victories were achieved over the Western front, including three four-engine bombers and three flying the Me 262 jet fighter. Three victories were achieved over the Eastern front. He was shot down 12 times, baling out on three occasions, and was wounded five times.

Asisbiz database list of 39 aerial victories for Rudolf 'Rudi' Sinner

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location Comments
1. 12.10.1941 9:05 P-40 2./JG 27 Sidi Omar Tomahawk IIb (AN355) of 3 Sqn, RAAF flown by Sgt TD Parker, baled out
2. 17.12.1941 11:10 2./JG 27 SE Martuba Hurricane of 1 Sqn, SAAF flown by Lt MacRobert
3. 13.2.1942 9:26 2./JG 27 ESE Tobruk -
4. 23.2.1942 13:23 P-40 2./JG 27 SE Umm-er-Rzem Kittyhawk of 450 Sqn, RAF flown by F/O CKT Thompson
5. 23.2.1942 13:25 P-40 2./JG 27 SE Umm-er-Rzem Kittyhawk of 450 Sqn, RAF flown by Sgt KM McBride, crash-landed, DOW
6. 30.5.1942 14:05 P-40 Stab I./JG 27 Bir-el-Harmat -
7. 24.6.1942 10:00 6./JG 27 20 km S Bir el Tholata Hurricane of 33 Sqn, RAF flown by P/O Ingelsby
8. 26.6.1942 18:40 6./JG 27 SE Marsa Matruh -
9. 10.7.1942 6:15 6./JG 27 SW El Alamein Hurricane of 274 Sqn, RAF flown by Sgt Craggs
10. 13.7.1942 12:25 P-40 6./JG 27 ENE El Dakar -
11. 17.7.1942 6:37 6./JG 27 El Dakar Spitfire of 145 Sqn, RAF flown by Sgt Rostart
12. 17.7.1942 13:22 6./JG 27 Haggag-el-Quasaba -
13. 17.7.1942 13:27 6./JG 27 S Haggag-el-Quasaba -
14. 19.7.1942 9:15 6./JG 27 Bir el Themta Hurricane of 127 or 238 Sqn, RAF
15. 19.7.1942 9:19 6./JG 27 S El Alamein Hurricane of 127 or 238 Sqn, RAF
16. 20.7.1942 11:19 6./JG 27 3 km SE Bir-el-Khasa Hurricane of 33 Sqn, RAF flown by Sgt Moher
17. 21.7.1942 18:09 P-40 6./JG 27 N Bir-el-Harmat -
18. 21.7.1942 18:16 6./JG 27 SW El Alamein -
19. 24.7.1942 9:40 P-40 6./JG 27 S Bir el Abd Kittyhawk of 112 Sqn, RAF or 5 Sqn, SAAF
20. 24.7.1942 17:19 6./JG 27 S Deir ei Raghil Hurricane of 92 Sqn, RAF flown by Sgt Moore, baled out, POW
21. 28.7.1942 18:25 6./JG 27 3 km E Deir-el-Taqa Hurricane IIa of 208 Sqn, RAF flown by P/O K Clark, killed
22. 3.8.1942 17:55 6./JG 27 SE El Daba Hurricane of 33 or 213 Sqn, RAF
23. 3.8.1942 18:00 6./JG 27 Bir Ibrahim Hurricane of 33 or 213 Sqn, RAF
24. 14.8.1942 6:30 P-40 6./JG 27 NW El Alamein Not confirmed
25. 27.8.1942 14:10 6./JG 27 NE Kharita Hurricane of 1 Sqn, SAAF flown by 2/Lt D de Klerk, killed
26. 31.8.1942 10:30 6./JG 27 Alam el Haifa Hurricane II "AX-A" of 1 SAAF Sqn flown by JH Gaynor (5.5/0/6 victories), crash-landed
27. 31.8.1942 18:30 6./JG 27 S Ilmayid -
28. 1.9.1942 6:59 P-40 6./JG 27 ENE Deir-el-Taqa Kittyhawk of 450 Sqn, RAF
29. 1.9.1942 7:01 P-40 6./JG 27 E Deir-el-Taqa Kittyhawk of 450 Sqn, RAF
30. 3.9.1942 14:25 P-40 6./JG 27 S El Hammam -
31. 3.9.1942 14:35 6./JG 27 S Bir Ibrahim -
32. 6.9.1942 17:25 P-39 6./JG 27 S Ilmayid -
33. 11.10.1943 15:08 LaGG-3 Stab IV./JG 54 NE Ussvyati -
34. 18.10.1943 10:04 P-40 Stab IV./JG 54 SE Pushkin -
35. 27.10.1943 13:45 La-5 Stab IV./JG 54 10 714 -
36. 6.3.1944 12:06 B-17 Stab III./JG 54  Essen-Vechta -
37. 26.11.1944 13:10 P-38 III./JG 7 Near Kitzbühl P-38J of 1FG, USAAF flown by Lt Julius Thomas, baled out, POW
38. 3.3.1945 - B-24 Stab III./JG 7 Near Rathenow B-24 of 448BG, USAAF
39. 3.3.1945 - B-24 Stab III./JG 7 Near Rathenow B-24 of 448BG, USAAF
? 7.3.1945 - P-51 Stab III./JG 7 not confirmed? -

Victories : 39
Awards : Deutsches Kreuz in Gold (27 October 1942)
Units : JG3, JG27, JG54, JG7
http://www.luftwaffe.cz/sinner.html

Asisbiz database list of 39 aerial victories for Rudolf 'Rudi' Sinner

Date Pilot Name Unit EA Type Height Time Location
12-Oct-41 Rudolf Sinner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.05 Sidi Omar
17-Dec-41 Rudolf Sinner 2./JG27   11.10 SE Martuba
13-Feb-42 Rudolf Sinner 2./JG27   09.23 ESE Tobruk
23-Feb-42 Rudolf Sinner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.23 NE Fort Acroma
23-Feb-42 Rudolf Sinner 2./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   13.25 SE Umm-er-Rzem
30-May-42 Rudolf Sinner Stab I./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.05 Bir-el-Hamat
24-Jun-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   10.00 20km S Bir-el-Tholata
26-Jun-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   18.40 SE Marsa Matruh
10-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 Hurricane IIc   06.15 SW El-Alamein
13-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.25 ENE El-Dakar
17-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   09.19 South of El-Alamein
17-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   06.37 El-Dakar
17-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   13.22 Haggag-el-Quasaba
17-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   13.27 S Haggag-el-Quasaba
19-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   09.15 Bir-el-Themta
20-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   11.19 3km SE Bir-el-Khasa
21-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.09 North of Bir-el-Hamat
21-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   18.16 SW El-Alamein
24-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.40 South of Bir-el-Abd
24-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   17.19 South of Deir-el-Raghil
28-Jul-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   18.25 3km E Deir-el-Taqua
03-Aug-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   17.55 SE El-Daba
03-Aug-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27   18.00 Bir Ibrahim
14-Aug-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 Curtiss P-46 2000m 06.30 5km NW El-Alamein
27-Aug-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 2000m 14.10 5km NE El-Kharita
31-Aug-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 6500m 18.30 15km S Sanyet
31-Aug-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 2000m 10.30 3km NW Deir-el-Ragel
01-Sep-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 Curtiss P-46 3500m 06.59 15km SE El-Taqa
01-Sep-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 Curtiss P-46   07.01 E El-Taqa
03-Sep-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.25 South of El-Hammam
03-Sep-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 5500m 14.35 3km S Bir-Ibrahim
06-Sep-42 Rudolf Sinner 6./JG27 U.S. Jager   17.25 South of Bir-El-Imayid
11-Oct-43 Rudolf Sinner Stab IV./JG54 LaGG-3 800m 15.08 06 263 (NE Ussvyati)
18-Oct-43 Rudolf Sinner Stab IV./JG54 P-40 Warhawk 2000m 10.04 00 441 (SE Pushkin)
27-Oct-43 Rudolf Sinner Stab IV./JG54 La-5 2000m 13.45 10 714
06-Mar-44 Rudolf Sinner Stab III./JG54 B-17 Fortress 6000m 12.06 FQ-3 to FR-2 (Essen-Vechta)
26-Nov-44 Rudolf Sinner 3./JG7 P-38 Lightning 2500m 13.10 FB-6
03-Mar-45 Rudolf Sinner Stab III./JG7 B-24 Liberator   - bei Rathenow
07-Mar-45 Rudolf Sinner 11./JG7 P-51 Mustang   - SW Berlin



Ernst Börngen

Ernst Börngen was born on 7 February 1916 at Meuselwitz in Thüringen. On 27 June 1940, Börngen joined JG 27. Leutnant Börngen was assigned to 4./JG 27. He recorded his first victories on 18 August, during the Battle of Britain, when he shot down two RAF Spitfire fighters over Selsey Bill. Börngen participated in the Balkans campaign. He shot down a Greek Gladiator biplane fighter near Kalambaka on 15 April 1941. Following the successful conclusion of the Balkans campaign, Börngen participated in Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of Russia. He claimed two Russian DB-3 twin-engine bombers shot down on 25 June to record his fourth and fifth victories. In late September 1941, II./JG 27 was relocated to North Africa. By the end of 1942, Börngen had added 13 British fighters and a solitary RAF Blenheim twin-engine bomber to his growing victory total. On 20 May 1943, Börngen was appointed Staffelkapitän of 5./JG 27.

On 11 July, he shot down a Spitfire (11) but received damage to his Bf 109 F-4trop (W.Nr. 102 03) “Black 3” in the combat that required he make a belly-landing at El Alamein. On 20 September, Börngen was wounded in aerial combat. Börngen led 5./JG 27 during the heavy fighting over southern Italy.

On 16 July 1943, Oberleutnant Börngen shot down a USAAF B-24 four-engine bomber to record his 28th victory but his Bf109 G-6trop (W.Nr. 183 71) was hit by return fire in the engagement. He again received wounds and was required to make a forced-landing. Following his recovery, Börngen was transferred for a spell of instructing at Jagdgruppe Süd.

In March/April 1944 he was transferred to the Geschwaderstab of JG 27 and, later, III./JG 27 on Reichsverteidigung duties. On 13 April 1944, Börngen was appointed Staffelkapitän of 2./JG 27. On 13 May 1944, Hauptmann Börngen was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of I./JG 27. On 19 May 1944, Börngen rammed a USAAF B-24 four-engine bomber over Helmstedt in Bf 109 G-6 (W.Nr. 441 101). He baled out but lost his right arm in the incident. His wounds resulted in him seeing no further action in the war.

Ernst Börngen was credited with 41 victories in 450 missions. He recorded two victories over the Eastern front. Of the 39 victories recorded over the Western front, 16 were four-engine bombers. Additionally, Börngen recorded 24 unconfirmed victories.

Web reference: http://www.luftwaffe.cz/borngen.html

Asisbiz database list of aerial victories for Ernst Börngen

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location / Comments
1. 18.8.1940 15:30 4./JG 27 Selsey Bill
2. 18.8.1940 15:40 4./JG 27 Selsey Bill
3. 15.4.1941 7:01 Gladiator 4./JG 27 W Trikkala
4. 25.6.1941 - DB-3 4./JG 27 Usmjany
5. 25.6.1941 - DB-3 4./JG 27  
6. 21.12.1941 15:02 5./JG 27 3km SW El Agheila
7. 30.5.1942 17:05 P-40 5./JG 27 SE Fort Acroma / Kittyhawk of 450 Sqn, RAF or 5 Sqn, SAAF
8. 5.6.1942 11:51 P-40 5./JG 27 20km NE Mteifl Chebir
9. 26.6.1942 19:03 P-40 5./JG 27 SE Marsa Matruh
10. 3.7.1942 18:10 P-40 5./JG 27 SW El Alamein
11. 11.7.1942 16:07 5./JG 27 SW El Alamein
12. 20.7.1942 18:23 P-40 5./JG 27 El Alamein
13. 15.9.1942 17:02 P-40 5./JG 27 S El Alamein
14. 9.10.1942 12:20 5./JG 27 N Sanyet Quotaifiya / Spitfire of 92 Sqn, RAF flown by P/O Harvey
15. 20.10.1942 9:20 P-40 5./JG 27 ENE El Daba
16. 27.10.1942 15:03 5./JG 27 N Turbiya
17. 27.10.1942 15:32 5./JG 27 NW El Alamein
18. 11.11.1942 9:27 P-40 5./JG 27 S Sollum
19. 29.4.1943 11:27 P-38 5./JG 27 10km SW Maréttimo
20. 22.5.1943 16:15 P-38 5./JG 27 SSW Maréttimo
21. 25.5.1943 11:32 B-17 5./JG 27 NW Maréttimo
22. 28.5.1943 18:02 B-24 5./JG 27 S Castelvertano
23. 28.5.1943 18:06 B-25 5./JG 27 SW Marsala
24. 2.7.1943 11:15 B-24 5./JG 27 30km ESE Lecce
25. 2.7.1943 11:25 B-24 5./JG 27 20km SW San Cesario
26. 10.7.1943 16:07 5./JG 27 30km SE Syracusa
27. 12.7.1943 - 5./JG 27  
28. 16.7.1943 13:10 B-24 5./JG 27 25km ENE Bari
29. 3.4.1944 10:46 B-17 Stab JG 27 50 S Budapest
30. 6.4.1944 16:23 B-17 Stab III./JG 27 30km SE Marburg
31. 12.4.1944 12:10 B-24 Stab III./JG 27 SW Neusiedler See
32. 12.4.1944 12:12 B-17 Stab III./JG 27 W Neusiedler See
33. 13.4.1944 11:48 B-17 Stab III./JG 27 10km ESE Raab (Györ)
34. 23.4.1944 14:50 B-17 2./JG 27 W Willendorf
35. 12.5.1944 12:37 B-17 Stab JG 27 NW Bamberg
36. 12.5.1944 12:57 B-17 Stab JG 27 Bad Orb
37. 19.5.1944 13:15 B-24 Stab I./JG 27 6km E Helmstedt
38. 19.5.1944 13:20 B-24 Stab I./JG 27 N Helmstedt

Victories : 41
Awards : Ehrenpokal (18 January 1943); Deutsches Kreuz in Gold (31 August 1943); Ritterkreuz (27 July 1944)
Units : JG 27

Web Reference: http://www.luftwaffe.cz/borngen.html

Asisbiz database list of aerial victories for Ernst Börngen

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
18-Aug-40 Ernst Boerngen 4./JG27 100m 15.40 Isle of Wight-Selsey Bill
18-Aug-40 Ernst Boerngen 4./JG27 3000m 15.30 Selsey Bill
15-Apr-41 Ernst Boerngen 4./JG27 Gladiator   07.01 West of Tríkala Greece
25-Jun-41 Ernst Boerngen 4./JG27 DB-3     Usmjany
25-Jun-41 Ernst Boerngen 4./JG27 DB-3     Usmjany
21-Dec-41 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 30m 15.02 3km SW El Agheila
30-May-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.05 SE Fort Acroma
05-Jun-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.51 20km NE Mteifl Chebir
26-Jun-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   19.03 SE Marsa Matruh
03-Jul-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   18.12 West of El-Alamein
11-Jul-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27   16.07 SW El-Alamein
20-Jul-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 3500m 18.23 5-8km E El-Alamein
15-Sep-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 Curtiss P-46   17.02 South of El-Alamein
09-Oct-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27   12.20 North of Sanyet Quotaifiya
20-Oct-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 Curtiss P-46   09.20 ESE El-Daba
27-Oct-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27   15.32 NW El-Alamein
27-Oct-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27   15.03 North of Turbiya
11-Nov-42 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 1000m 09.27 20km S Sollum
29-Apr-43 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 P-38F Lightning 500m 11.22 10-12km W Marettimo
22-May-43 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 P-38 Lightning 5200m 16.15 SSW Marettimo
25-May-43 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 B-17F   11.32 50km NNW Cap San Vito
28-May-43 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 B-24 Liberator 3000m 18.02 20km ssE Cap Granitola
28-May-43 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 B-25 Mitchell 3500m 18.06 20km SE Marsala
02-Jul-43 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 B-24 Liberator 7500m 11.25 15-20km SW San Cesaria
02-Jul-43 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 B-24 Liberator 8000m 11.15 30-35km ESE Lecce
10-Jul-43 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 2000m 16.07 30km SE Syracuse
12-Jul-43 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27      
16-Jul-43 Ernst Boerngen 5./JG27 B-24D Liberator 7000m 13.10 25-30km ENE Bari
03-Apr-44 Ernst Boerngen Stab /JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 10.46 50km S Budapest
06-Apr-44 Ernst Boerngen Stab III./JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 16.23 30-35km NW Marburg
12-Apr-44 Ernst Boerngen Stab III./JG27 B-17 Fortress 5200m 12.12 W. Neusiedler See
12-Apr-44 Ernst Boerngen Stab III./JG27 B-24 Liberator 6200m 12.10 SW Neusiedler See
13-Apr-44 Ernst Boerngen Stab III./JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 11.48 ESE Raab (Gyor)
23-Apr-44 Ernst Boerngen 2./JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 14.50 West of Willendorf
12-May-44 Ernst Boerngen Stab /JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 12.57 QB-45 (West of Lichterfels)
12-May-44 Ernst Boerngen Stab /JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 12.37 QT-23 (Bad Orb)
19-May-44 Ernst Boerngen Stab I./JG27 B-24 Liberator 7500m 13.20 North of Helmstedt
19-May-44 Ernst Boerngen Stab I./JG27 B-24 Liberator   13.15 6km E Helmstedt



Hans Glessinger

Asisbiz database list of 1 aerial victories for Hans Glessinger

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
November 22, 1941 Hans Glessinger 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 1200m 16:31 Bir Hacheim



Hans Niederhofer

Asisbiz database list of 15 aerial victories for Hans Niederhofer

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
Thursday, November 20, 1941 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27     South of El Adem
Saturday, November 22, 1941 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17:00  
Sunday, November 30, 1941 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 4000m 10:35± bei Ain-el-Gazala
Monday, December 01, 1941 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 1600m 12:30 SW Sidi Rezegh
Tuesday, December 09, 1941 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 Hurricane I 4300m 11:55 S. Tobruk
Tuesday, December 09, 1941 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 Lysander 2000m 17:10 SSE El Adem
Saturday, April 11, 1942 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10:50 10km NW Sidi-el-Mansur
Monday, May 25, 1942 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 2000m 07:27 20km E. Tmimi
Friday, June 05, 1942 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 50m 11:00 5km W. Fort Acroma
Friday, June 05, 1942 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 500m 11:40 1km SW El Adem
Tuesday, June 16, 1942 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 4000m 16:40 5km E El Adem
Friday, August 21, 1942 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   - SSE El-Alamein
Sunday, August 30, 1942 Hans Niederhofer 5./JG27 Hurricane I 5-10m 16:50 S. El-Alamein
Friday, October 08, 1943 Hans Niederhofer 8./JG27 P-38 Lightning 3500m 13:47 15km S. Koshyta
Friday, October 08, 1943 Hans Niederhofer 8./JG27 P-38 Lightning 6500m 13:57 25km W. Kyriakion 5m



Ernst Düllberg

Ernst Dullberg was born on 28 March 1913 at Unna in Westalen. At the outbreak of World War 2, Dullberg was serving in the Stabsstaffel of I./JG3. On 21 July 1940, he transferred to 8./JG27. He recorded his first victory, a RAFbomber, on 1 August. On 5 August 1940, Dullberg was appointed Staffelkapitan of 5./JG27. By the end of 1940, he had claimed a further five victories over England during the Battle of Britain. During the brief deployment of II./JG27 to Russia, Dullberg claimed a Russian SB-3 bomber shot down before the unit was relocated to North Africa.

On 22 November 1941, Dullberg was wounded in aerial combat with British fighters but managed to return to his airfield at Ain-el-Gazala where he made a successful belly landing (Bf 109F-4 trop W.Nr. 8466). It would appear he was the victim of In February 1942, Dullberg returned to combat duty serving with 5./JG27. On 26 May, he was transferred to the Geschwaderstab of JG27. On 11 October 1942, Dullberg was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of III./JG27. Dullberg's total had reached 18 by the end of 1942. By the end of 1943, he had increased his score to 28. In spring 1944, III./JG27 was relocated to Germany to undertake Reichsverteidigung duties.

Dullberg was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 27 July 1944 for 35 victories. On 7 October was Major Dullberg appointed Kommodore of JG76. He led the unit to Hungary where he led all the fighter units operating in the southeast: II./JG51, II./JG52 and III./JG53 in addition to the Hungarian fighter units. Dullberg claimed his last eight victories, all Russian fighters, during this period. In February 1945, Dullberg underwent conversion to the Me-262 jet fighter with III./EJG2. In March, he joined II./JG7, leading ground forces of this unit until the end of the war. Dullberg died on 27 July 1984 at Essen.

Ernst Dullberg was credited with 45 victories in 650 missions. He recorded nine victories over the Eastern front. Included in his victory total are 10 four-engined heavy bombers.

Asisbiz database list of aerial victories for Ernst Dullberg

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location / Comments
1. 1.8.1940 16:45 8./JG27 Cherbourg area
2. 18.8.1940 15:27 5./JG27 Selsey Bill
3. 30.8.1940 12:15 5./JG27 Ashford
4. 27.9.1940 10:17 5./JG27 Biggin Hill
5. 30.9.1940 17:50 5./JG27 London
6. 7.10.1940 14:45 5./JG27 London
7. 25.6.1941 12:31 SB-3 5./JG27 SW Wilna / Eastern front
8. 5.10.1941 9:40 5./JG27 N Sidi Omar / Hurricane of 33 Sqn, RAF
9. 22.10.1941 12:00 P-40 5./JG27 near Sidi Omar / Tomahawk of 2 Sqn, SAAF flown by Lt Sturm
10. 12.11.1941 15:44 P-40 5./JG27 Bardia-Sollum / Hurricane of 451 Sqn, RAF
11. 9.2.1942 9:58 P-40 5./JG27 Martuba / Tomahawk of 208 Sqn, RAF flown by F/O Davies
12. 12.2.1942 13:25 5./JG27 Tobruk / Fulmar of RN Fulmar Flt flown by Sub Lt Polwin
13. 27.3.1942 - P-40 5./JG27  
14. 11.4.1942 10:54 P-40 5./JG27 ESE el Mansur / Tomahawk of 4 Sqn, SAAF
15. 20.4.1942 11:55 P-40 5./JG27 8km S Gambut / Hurricane of 33 Sqn, RAF
16. 13.7.1942 18:48 Stab JG27 12km SW El Alamein
17. 20.10.1942 9:25 P-46 Stab III./JG27 E El-Daba
18. 25.10.1942 8:40 P-46 Stab III./JG27 NW El-Alamein
19. 28.9.1943 16:08 Stab III./JG27 E Kardamaina
20. 30.9.1943 14:40 Walrus Stab III./JG27 Leros
21. 5.10.1943 12:55 B-24 Stab III./JG27 W Lidorikion
22. 14.11.1943 13:35 Stab III./JG27 NE Leros
23. 16.11.1943 12:30 Stab III./JG27 E Levita
24. 6.12.1943 12:55 B-17 Stab III./JG27 W Milos
25. 13.12.1943 8:18 Baltimore Stab III./JG27 S Georgios
26. 14.12.1943 10:55 B-17 Stab III./JG27 E Tatoi
27. 20.12.1943 12:39 B-17 Stab III./JG27 Eleusis
28. 20.12.1943 12:50 B-17 Stab III./JG27 NE Megara
29. 2.4.1944 10:34 B-24 Stab III./JG27 SW Wolfsberg
30. 23.4.1944 13:40 B-24 HSS Stab III./JG27 W Veszprem
31. 12.5.1944 12:35 B-17 Stab III./JG27 50km NE Frankfurt
32. 24.5.1944 10:15 B-24 Stab III./JG27 40km N Bruck a. d. Mur
33. 29.5.1944 9:50 B-24 Stab III./JG27 30km SE Markersdorf
34. 10.6.1944 14:30 P-47 Stab III./JG27 NE Lisieux
35. 6.7.1944 6:25 P-47 Stab III./JG27 25km NE Lisieux
36. 17.8.1944 19:07 Typhoon Stab III./JG27 94 Ost N/AU, Flers area
37. 18.8.1944 19:25 P-51 Stab III./JG27 5km W Laigneville
38. ? - Russian fighter Stab JG76 Eastern front
39. ? - Russian fighter Stab JG76 Eastern front
40. ? - Russian fighter Stab JG76 Eastern front
41. ? - Russian fighter Stab JG76 Eastern front
42. ? - Russian fighter Stab JG76 Eastern front
43. ? - Russian fighter Stab JG76 Eastern front
44. ? - Russian fighter Stab JG76 Eastern front
45. ? - Russian fighter Stab JG76 Eastern front

Victories: 45
Awards: Knight's Cross
Units : JG3, JG27, JG76, EJG2, JG7

Asisbiz database list of 44 aerial victories for Ernst Dullberg

Date Pilot Name Unit EA Type Height Time Location
01-Aug-40 Ernst Dullberg 8./JG27 6000m 16.45 Raum Cherbourg
18-Aug-40 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27 6500m 15.27 Selsey Bill
30-Aug-40 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27 800-1000m 12.15 Ashford
30-Aug-40 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27   12.15 Ashford
06-Sep-40 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27      
27-Sep-40 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27   10.17 Biggin Hill
30-Sep-40 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27   17.50 London
07-Oct-40 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27 8000m 14.45 South of London
28-Oct-40 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27   - -
25-Jun-41 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27 Martin   12.31  
13-Jul-41 Ernst Dullberg Stab /JG27   18.48 12km SW El-Alamein
05-Oct-41 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27   09.40 North of Sidi Omar
22-Oct-41 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   12.00 East of Sidi Omar
12-Nov-41 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 7500m 15.44 ENE Bardia
09-Feb-42 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 6000m 09.58 SE Martuba
12-Feb-42 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 300m 13.25 10-15km N.Tobruk
27-Mar-42 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 6500m - -
11-Apr-42 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 2000m 10.54 ESE Sidi-el-Mansur
20-Apr-42 Ernst Dullberg 5./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 1200m 11.55 8km S. Gambut
13-Jul-42 Ernst Dullberg StabJG27 3000m 18.48 8-12km SW El-Alamein
20-Oct-42 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 Curtiss P-46   09.25 East of El-Daba
25-Oct-42 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 Curtiss P-46   08.40 NW El-Alamein
28-Sep-43 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 5000m 16.08 30km S. Khardamaina 5.300m (Kos)
30-Sep-43 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 Walrus 5000m 14.40 off Salamis-Insel Leros 50m
05-Oct-43 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-24 Liberator Low Level 12.55 10km W. Lidorikion
14-Nov-43 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 4-5000m 13.35 NE Insel Leros 50m
16-Nov-43 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 20m 12.30 E. Insel Levita 20m
06-Dec-43 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6000m 12.55 West of Milis
13-Dec-43 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-24 Liberator 6500m 08.18 SSE Insel Georgios
14-Dec-43 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-17 Fortress 2500m 10.55 E. Tatoi (Athens/Greece)
20-Dec-43 Ernst Dullberg Stab JG27 B-17 Fortress 10m 12.50 Insel Korfu
20-Dec-43 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-17 Fortress 7600m 12.39 Eleusis
23-Mar-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-24 Liberator   13.40 W. Megara
23-Mar-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-24 Liberator 6500m 13.40 West of Megara
02-Apr-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-24 Liberator 7200m 10.34 SW Wolfsberg
23-Apr-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-24 HSS 2000m 13.40 W. Veszprem (Transdanubia)
12-May-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-17 Fortress 6500m 12.35-40 50-60kmvor Frankfurt-Main
24-May-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-24 Liberator 6000m 10.15 30km vor Bruck-ad-Mur
29-May-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 B-24 Liberator 4300m 09.50 30km SE Markersdorf
10-Jun-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 7500m 14.30 TH (Lisieux)
06-Jul-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt   06.25 20-30km NE Lisieux
17-Aug-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab II./JG27 Typhoon 1000m 19.07 UA (Bocage Falaise area)
18-Aug-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab III./JG27 P-51 Mustang 50m 19.25 TE-9 (Creil)
04-Nov-44 Ernst Dullberg Stab /JG77 Yak-9 2500m   SW Pilis (SE Budapest)



Wolfgang Lippert

Luftwaffe pilot Wolfgang Lippert was a, following fighter pilot training, was posted to I./JG134 'Horst Wessel'. On 15 March 1937, Oberleutnant Lippert was transferred, as a founding member, to I./JG53 based at Wiesbaden-Erbenheim. Lippert gained his first aerial victories during the Spanish Civil War flying with the Condor Legion. Leutnant Lippert was assigned to 3. Staffel of J 88. He amassed five victories in this conflict between the middle of 1938 and March 1939, receiving the award of the Spanienkreuz in Gold mit Schwerten. Following his return to Germany, Lippert was appointed Staffelkapitän of 3./JG53 on 1 May 1939. He led the unit during the French campaign. He claimed his first victory of World War 2 on 30 September 1939, when he shot down a French Morane fighter in the Wissembourg area. Hauptmann Lippert was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG27 on 4 September 1940. He gained five victories with the unit over England during the Battle of Britain, all RAF fighters.

He was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 24 September after 13 victories gained in World War 2. Lippert was to lead II./JG27 in the invasion of Russia, after a brief sojourn in the Balkans. Lippert had compiled 25 victories, including his Spanish Civil War victories, by the time the Gruppe was relocated to North Africa at the end of September 1941. He claimed two RAF P-40 fighters and a Wellington twin-engine bomber shot down on 22 November to record his 27th through 29th victories. On 23 November 1941, after shooting down a RAF Hurricane fighter, Lippert's Bf109F-4 (W.Nr. 8469) was hit in the engine while engaged with Curtiss P-40s and Blenheim bombers. In baling out of his stricken aircraft, he broke both his legs when he struck the vertical stabiliser. He landed behind British lines, was captured and taken to a hospital in Egypt.

Both legs became infected and required amputation. He died from an embolism after the operation without regaining consciousness. Some sources indicate that Lippert was shot down by the Australian ace Clive Caldwell (28.5 confirmed, 6 probable and 15 damaged victories) of RAF 250Sqn. Wolfgang Lippert was credited with 30 victories. His score included five victories gained during the Spanish Civil War and four victories claimed over the Eastern front.

Asisbiz database list of aerial victories for Wolfgang Lippert

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location / Comments
1 15.7.1938 - I-15 3. J/88 Spain
2 23.7.1938 - I-16 3. J/88 Spain
3 14.8.1938 - I-16 3. J/88 Spain
4 4.10.1938 - I-16 3. J/88 Spain
5 29.12.1938 - I-15 3. J/88 Spain
6 30.9.1939 14:45 Morane 3./JG53 Büdingen
- 7.4.1940 - 3./JG53 Near Thionville / not confirmed
7 7.4.1940 12:50 3./JG53 SW Diedenhofen / Hurricane of 73Sqn RAF flown by P/O GF Brotchie, baled out, wounded
8 10.5.1940 13:55 Curtiss Hawk 3./JG53 SE Metz
9 14.5.1940 19:30 Wellington 3./JG53 Sedan
10 15.5.1940 16:13 Bloch 151 3./JG53 S Charleville
11 20.5.1940 18:35 Curtiss Hawk 3./JG53 Noyon
12 3.6.1940 14:20 3./JG53 S Paris
13 9.6.1940 14:50 Curtiss Hawk 3./JG53 Proult
14 16.8.1940 18:00 3./JG53 -
15 26.8.1940 17:35 3./JG53 Portsmouth
16 2.9.1940 8:55 3./JG53 -
17 7.9.1940 19:05 Stab II./JG27 London
18 17.9.1940 16:48 Stab II./JG27 Maidstone
19 25.10.1940 13:05 Stab II./JG27 London
20 25.10.1940 13:06 Stab II./JG27 London
21 1.11.1940 9:15 Stab II./JG27 Canterbury
22 22.6.1941 4:15 I-15 Stab II./JG27 S Knyszyn
23 22.6.1941 4:18 I-17 Stab II./JG27 NW Wizna
24 25.6.1941 - SB-3 Stab II./JG27 N Njemenczin
25 25.6.1941 12:15 DB-3 Stab II./JG27 SW Wilna
26 23.10.1941 9:30 Stab II./JG27 S Bug Bug / Hurricane of 1Sqn, SAAF flown by Lt Mackenzie
27 22.11.1941 10:20 P-40 Stab II./JG27 S Ain el Gazala
28 22.11.1941 16:30 P-40 Stab II./JG27 NW Bir Hacheim / Tomahawk of 112Sqn, RAF or 3Sqn, RAAF
29 22.11.1941 16:45 Wellington Stab II./JG27 Bir Hacheim / Wellington of 109Sqn, RAF
30 23.11.1941 12:25 Stab II./JG27 S Bir Hacheim / Hurricane of 229 or 238Sqn, RAF

Victories: 30
Awards: Ritterkreuz (24 September 1940)
Units: JG134, J/88, JG53, JG27
http://www.luftwaffe.cz/lippert.html

Asisbiz database list of 30 aerial victories for Wolfgang Lippert

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Time Location
30-Sep-39 Wolfgang Lippert 3./JG53 Morane 14.45 Budingen
07-Apr-40 Wolfgang Lippert 3./JG53 12.50 SW Diederhofen
10-May-40 Wolfgang Lippert 3./JG53 Hawk-75A 13.55 SE Metz
14-May-40 Wolfgang Lippert 3./JG53 Wellington 19.30 Sedan
15-May-40 Wolfgang Lippert 3./JG53 Bloch 151 16.13 S Charleville
20-May-40 Wolfgang Lippert 3./JG53 Hawk-75A 18.35 Noyon
03-Jun-40 Wolfgang Lippert 3./JG53 14.20 South of Paris
09-Jun-40 Wolfgang Lippert 3./JG53 Hawk-75A 14.50 Proult
16-Aug-40 Wolfgang Lippert 3./JG53 19.00  
26-Aug-40 Wolfgang Lippert 3./JG53 17.35 Portsmouth
02-Sep-40 Wolfgang Lippert 3./JG53 08.55  
07-Sep-40 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 19.05 South of London
17-Sep-40 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 16.48 Maidstone
25-Oct-40 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 13.05 South of London
25-Oct-40 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 13.06 South of London
01-Nov-40 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 09.15 Canterbury
22-Jun-41 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 I-15 Rata 04.15  
22-Jun-41 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 I-17 04.18  
25-Jun-41 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 DB-3 12.15  
23-Oct-41 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 09.30 South of Buq Buq
22-Nov-41 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 Wellington 16.45 NW Bir Hacheim
22-Nov-41 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 16.30 NW Bir Hacheim
22-Nov-41 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 10.20 SE Ain-el-Gazala
23-Nov-41 Wolfgang Lippert Stab II./JG27 12.25 S Bir Hacheim



'Every- Geschwader has its own personality'

EDUARD NEUMANN, JG27

During the campaign in the West, I was Gescbwaderadjutant to Oberst Max Ibel. He had already fought as a pioneer during the First World War, but at that time our Stab was distinguished by Hptm. Adolf Galland who showed great abilities as a promising fighter pilot. In July 1940, I became Kommandeur of I./JG27 and claimed my first victory, a Spitfire, on 8 August. At the end of the Battle of Britain, I had six Abscbusse and one of my best pilots was Obit. Gerhard Homuth, Kapitan of 3. Staffel.

We were assigned to North Africa even before the end of the Balkan campaign. We flew to Sicily and then on to. Africa where we landed at Gazala, between Derna and Tobruk. Part of the first Staffel was already there. When we arrived, our opponents were Hurricanes which had had it easy with the unescorted Stukas. We had significant advantages over the Hurricanes.andwere very good pilots.in particular was magnificent, looked after by the gods, though he was a little rascal and an impertinent lad. Consequently, when other Gescbwader had to release some pilots to our unit, he was assigned to our unit at Doberitz even though he was a very good pilot and already had several Abscbusse. When he arrived, his hair was too long, and his jacket was shabby. His father was a general in the Army, but at that time Marseille was not yet a Leutnant. It was said that he kept the company of film actresses and he was not considered suitable to be an officer. His Staffelkapitan was Homuth who was serious and intellectual, the opposite ofanddid not like him. I kept a tight rein onand he trusted me. Every Gescbwader has its own personality. We had our own intentions and we protected our own. In Africa, Kesselring wanted us to attack the airfields at Alamein with the Stukas, but I told him that this would result only in our annihilation. One had to protest vehemently to achieve the objective and in JG27 there was a dedicated loyalty which is the reason members of the Gescbwader continue to this day to come to the reunions.

I became Kommodore of JG27 on 10 June 1942. Homuth took my place as Kommandeur of 1. Gruppe andtook overFrom Africa I went to Athens in Greece for the air defence of the Aegean. One Gruppe was at Athens, one on Crete, and another in France. In March 1943 I returned to Berlin and Radel took command of the Gescbwader. When I left, my tally was relatively poor compared to those of the aces which our unit had generated, but I considered that I had carried out my duties the best way I could.

In 1928 Eduard went to Berlin to study mechanical and aviation engineering. It was here that he discovered his enthusiasm for flight and quickly became a member of the 'Akakflieg' Glider club in 1929. In 1932 he passed his flying examinations in powered flight in Cottbus. In 1934 he began training on the Fieseler Fi-5 aircraft, then later the same year he joined the fledgling Luftwaffe, which was still under secret construction. In Schleissheim he received final combat training, Neumann was then deployed toin July 1935.

After the re-training on the Bf-109D at Barth in August 1937 he was transferred to the Luftwaffe's 'Condor Legion' which was to be sent to aid General Franco's Fascists in thealong with other notable personalities like Adolf Galland and Werner Mölders. After a year's service Neumann returned to Germany at the rank of Oberleutnant with two victories and the Spanish Cross in Gold with Swords, and was then appointed Gruppenkommandeur with 4/JG26 in Düsseldorf, remaining with the unit until departing for Jagdgeschwader 27 in early 1940, becoming the unit's Adjutant.

The day after scoring his first (World War Two) victory during the opening phase of the Battle of Britain, a RAF 236 Squadronoff the coast of Cherbourg on the 20th July 1940, he was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of I/JG27 to replace Major Helmut Riegel, shot down and killed byoff the Island of Alderney. After a brief participation in thein April 1941 the unit moved to Ain-el Gazala, Libya, North Africa on 18 April 1941. He received the German Cross in Gold on 11 May 1942 as Hauptmann and Gruppenkommandeur I./JG27.

On 8th June 1942 he was promoted to Major and Geschwaderkommodore of JG27, which he successfully led until 22 April 1943 when he joined the Staff of General der Jagdflieger. In March 1943 Neumann was promoted to Oberstleutnant (Lieutenant Colonel), and later in 1944 to Oberst (Colonel). Eduard Neumann finished the war as the Commander of Fighter Forces in Northern Italy. Neumann was a believer in leading his squadron from the ground, and given these long periods of administrative command, Neumann's active combat career was somewhat limited, although he became one of the most respected and influential field commanders in the Luftwaffe. As a consequence he only achieved 13 victories during his Luftwaffe career (2 in Spain). In early 1945 Neumann was among those courageous men to protest against Hermann Göring in what came to be known as the 'Fighter Pilots Revolt' or 'Fighter Pilots Mutiny'.

One of Neumann's most successful achievements was the molding of the career ofgiving the unorthodox fighter pilot a free reign to practice his tactics. Marseille went on to score 158 victories against the Western Allied Air Forces, a number no other pilot would match. In 1989 Neumann and other members of JG27 erected a Pyramid with the co-operation of the Egyptian Government on the place that Marseille fell to his death.

After the War

After the war Eduard 'Edu' Neumann developed an engineering company. He continued to fly as hobby, after the banning of civilian flight clubs had been lifted. Neumann remained a member of the German Fighter Pilot's Association, until his death from a long illness aged 93.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eduard Neumann

Asisbiz Database of 13 aerial victories for Eduard Neumann

Date Pilot Name Unit EA Type Height Time Location
20-Jul-40 Eduard Neumann Stab /JG27   19.15 30km South of Portland
08-Aug-40 Eduard Neumann Stab I./JG27   13.55 40km South The Needles
11-Sep-40 Eduard Neumann Stab I./JG27   17.05 Dungeness
17-Sep-40 Eduard Neumann Stab I./JG27   16.30 Gatwick
27-Sep-40 Eduard Neumann Stab I./JG27   10.15 Orpington
15-Jun-41 Eduard Neumann Stab I./JG27   17.30 10km W Capuzzo
08-Jul-41 Eduard Neumann Stab I./JG27   07.55 5km E Halfaya-Pass
27-Sep-41 Eduard Neumann Stab I./JG27   10.00 West of Bardia
23-Nov-41 Eduard Neumann Stab I./JG27   12.44 Sidi Rezegh
30-Nov-41 Eduard Neumann Stab I./JG27 3000m 16.00 Bir el Gobi



Gustav Rodel

Gustav Rödel was born on 24 October 1915 at Merseburg in Sachsen. He joined the Luftwaffe with the rank of Fahnenjunker in 1936 and underwent fighter pilot training. Rödel participated in the Spanish Civil War with the Condor Legion serving with J 88. He was awarded the Spanienkreuz in Bronze with Schwertern for his achievements there.

On 15 July 1939, Rödel joined JG21. Leutnant Rödel was assigned to 2./JG21. He participated in the invasion of Poland gaining his first victory, a Polish P.24 fighter shot down near Warschau, on 1 September. However, on 7 September, he was forced down during a ground-strafing mission. It is unclear whether this was as a result of ground fire or mechanical failure. Fortunately, he was able to bring his machine back almost to the border and managed to avoid detection and returned to his unit the next day. Rödel transferred to the Geschwaderstab of JG27 on 24 November 1939.

He participated in the French campaign gaining a further three victories. In July 1940, Rödel was transferred to 4./JG27. On 7 September, Rödel was appointed Staffelkapitän of 4./JG27. By the end of September, he had recorded 14 victories, the majority of these falling in the aerial battles over England. II./JG27 participated in the invasion of the Balkans. Rödel recorded six victories in the aerial battles over Greece, including three Greek fighters shot down on 15 April 1941 and three RAF Hurricane fighters shot down on 20 April. Oberleutnant Rödel was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 22 June for 20 victories. Following the successful conclusion of the Balkan campaign, Rödel and 4./JG27 participated in the invasion of Russia. Rödel claimed a Russian SB-3 twin-engine bomber shot down on 25 June 1941 for his 21st victory. Shortly afterwards 4./JG27 were transferred to North Africa. Here, Rödel claimed his 30th victory on 4 December 1941, when he shot down a South African P-40 fighter near Bir el Gobi. On 20 May 1942, Rödel was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG27. He recorded his 40th victory on 23 May, when he shot down another P-40 fighter near Ras el Tin.

On 21 July, he claimed four Hurricanes shot down to record his 48th through 51st victories. He claimed three P-39 fighters shot down in the El Alamein area on 9 October (58-60). However, he had mis-identified his victims which were, in all probability, RAF P-40 fighters. In October 1942, Rödel claimed 15 victories, including three RAF P-40 fighters shot down on 24 October (64-66) and three fighters shot down on 27 October (67-69). On 1 November he claimed his 73rd victory, his last in North Africa. Rödel was appointed Kommodore of JG27 on 22 April 1943. He saw combat over Sicily and Greece in May. On 22 May, he shot down three enemy aircraft (76-78). Major Rödel was awarded the Eichenlaub (Nr 255) on 20 June 1943. He recorded his 80th victory on 4 October and his 83rd on 10 October. Relocated to Germany and Reichsverteidigung duties, Rödel raised his victory total to 93, including many USAAF four-engine bombers. In June 1944, he led JG27 over the Invasion front. On 29 June, he claimed three USAAF P-47 fighters shot down (95-97). On 5 July, he claimed his 98th, and last, victory a USAAF P-38 twin-engine fighter shot down near Angleure.

In December 1944, Rödel was involved in the planning of Operation Bodenplatte. From the beginning of January 1945, he was serving on the staff of 2. Jagddivision, becoming Kommandeur on 1 February, a position he held until the end of the war. Post-war, Rödel joined the Bundesluftwaffe, retiring with the rank of Generalmajor. He died on 6 February 1995, aged 80.

Gustav Rödel was credited with 98 victories in 980 missions. He recorded one victory over the Eastern front. Of his 97 victories recorded over the Western front, 12 were four-engine bombers.

Asisbiz Database of aerial victories for Gustav Rodel

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location / Comments
1 1.9.1939 17:08 PZL P.24 2./JG21 Warschau area
2 12.5.1940 10:15 Stab/JG27 15km S Luttich
3 2.6.1940 9:14 Stab/JG27 W Dunkirk
4 7.6.1940 10:50 Potez 63 Stab/JG27 NW Dunkirk
5 11.8.1940 10:40 4./JG27 N Cap de la Hague
6 30.8.1940 12:28 4./JG27 N Redhill
7 1.9.1940 15:05 4./JG27 Ashford
8 1.9.1940 15:30 4./JG27 Folkestone
9 3.9.1940 11:20 4./JG27 Southend
10 3.9.1940 11:50 4./JG27 Southend
11 6.9.1940 10:05 4./JG27 Tunbridge Wells
- 6.9.1940 - 4./JG27 not confirmed
- 6.9.1940 - 4./JG27 not confirmed
12 11.9.1940 16:32 4./JG27 Elham
13 27.9.1940 13:05 4./JG27 Milton Regis
14 27.9.1940 16:18 4./JG27 E London
- 13.10.1940 - 4./JG27 not confirmed
15 15.4.1941 6:50 4./JG27 W Trikkala / Bloch 151 of 24 Mira, EVA flown by Cpl George Mokkas, killed
16 15.4.1941 6:55 PZL P-24 4./JG27 W Trikkala / Gladiator of 21 Mira, EVA
17 15.4.1941 7:05 PZL P-24 4./JG27 10km NE Trikkala / P.24G of 22 Mira, EVA
18 20.4.1941 16:57 4./JG27 Megara / Hurricane of 80Sqn, RAF
19 20.4.1941 17:01 4./JG27 Migalo / Hurricane of 80Sqn, RAF
20 20.4.1941 17:08 4./JG27 Migalo / Hurricane of 80Sqn, RAF
21 25.6.1941 16:40 SB-3 4./JG27 Wilna
22 3.10.1941 15:55 4./JG27 SW Sidi Barrani / Tomahawk of 112Sqn, RAF
23 10.10.1941 9:10 P-40 4./JG27 SE Sidi Omar / Tomahawk of 2Sqn, SAAF
24 10.10.1941 9:20 4./JG27 SE Sidi Omar
25 22.11.1941 14:05 4./JG27 80km SE Gazala / Blenheim of 11Sqn, RAF
26 22.11.1941 16:40 P-40 4./JG27 SE Bir Hacheim
27 25.11.1941 15:55 4./JG27 N Tobruk
28 25.11.1941 15:57 P-40 4./JG27 N Tobruk
29 1.12.1941 12:40 4./JG27 SW El Adem / Hurricane of 1Sqn, SAAF or 274Sqn, RAF
30 4.12.1941 10:18 P-40 4./JG27 NE Bir el Gobi / Hurricane of 1Sqn, SAAF flown by 2/Lt Meek
31 5.12.1941 11:55 P-40 4./JG27 NW Bir el Gobi / Tomahawk of 250 or 112Sqn, RAF
32 6.12.1941 11:55 4./JG27 Tobruk / Beaufighter of 272Sqn, RAF flown by P/O Snow
33 4.1.1942 8:40 4./JG27 20km SE Agedabia
34 27.3.1942 17:24 P-40 4./JG27 SW Ain el Gazala / Hurricane of 80Sqn, RAF
35 27.3.1942 17:10 P-40 4./JG27 Tobruk / Hurricane of 80Sqn, RAF / not confirmed
36 6.4.1942 8:23 P-40 4./JG27 Tmimi-Martuba
37 7.4.1942 15:43 P-40 4./JG27 N Mtfeil Chebir / Kittyhawk of 450Sqn, RAF
38 9.4.1942 14:25 P-40 4./JG27 30km SW Mtfeil Chabir / Tomahawk of 40Sqn, SAAF flown by Lt Gouws
39 25.4.1942 9:55 P-40 4./JG27 6km N Ain el Gazala
40 23.5.1942 9:40 P-40 II./JG27 10km N Ras el Tin / Hurricane of 33Sqn, RAF flown by F/Lt Wade
41 23.5.1942 9:47 P-40 II./JG27 40km NE Ras el Tin
42 4.6.1942 8:15 P-40 II./JG27 3km SE Bir Hacheim / Tomahawk of 4Sqn, SAAF
43 10.7.1942 10:32 II./JG27 6km SW El Alamein
44 10.7.1942 10:37 P-40 II./JG27 NE Miteiriga
45 10.7.1942 10:40 P-40 II./JG27 1km S Murmin Busak
46 19.7.1942 9:13 II./JG27 Chebel el Gabir / Hurricane of 238Sqn, RAF
47 19.7.1942 9:17 II./JG27 Bir Gabatte / Hurricane of 238Sqn, RAF
48 21.7.1942 18:10 II./JG27 SSW Alamein
49 21.7.1942 18:12 II./JG27 SSW Alamein
50 21.7.1942 18:12 II./JG27 NE El Daba
51 21.7.1942 18:20 II./JG27 4km NE El Taqua
52 31.8.1942 18:29 II./JG27 15km SSE El Alamein
53 1.9.1942 7:01 P-40 II./JG27 Kittyhawk of 450Sqn, RAF
54 3.9.1942 10:20 P-40 II./JG27 Deir el Raghil
55 5.9.1942 10:53 P-40 II./JG27 SSW El Alamein
56 5.9.1942 10:57 P-40 II./JG27 SSW El Alamein
57 5.9.1942 11:00 P-40 II./JG27 SSW El Alamein
58 9.10.1942 9:23 P-39 II./JG27 N Turbiya
59 9.10.1942 9:27 P-39 II./JG27 NNE El Daba
60 9.10.1942 9:35 P-39 II./JG27 25km NW Sanyet Quotaifiya
61 13.10.1942 9:39 P-39 II./JG27 SSW El Alamein / Kittyhawk of 4Sqn, SAAF
62 22.10.1942 10:45 B-25 II./JG27 SW El Alamein / B-25 of 12 BG, USAAF
63 24.10.1942 9:43 P-40 II./JG27 SW El Alamein
64 24.10.1942 9:45 P-40 II./JG27 WSW El Alamein
65 24.10.1942 9:50 P-40 II./JG27 W El Alamein
66 26.10.1942 16:08 P-40 II./JG27 SW Sanyet Quotaifiya / Kittyhawk of 260Sqn, RAF flown by Sgt Rattle
67 27.10.1942 9:23 II./JG27 SSW El Hammam
68 27.10.1942 9:42 P-40 II./JG27 SSW El Alamein
69 27.10.1942 15:05 P-39 II./JG27 N El Daba
70 29.10.1942 9:05 P-40 II./JG27 Deir el Bein
71 31.10.1942 9:52 P-40 II./JG27 SW Sanyet Quotaifiya
72 31.10.1942 9:55 P-40 II./JG27 SW Sanyet Quotaifiya
73 1.11.1942 7:05 II./JG27 S Sidi el Rahman
74 18.5.1943 13:44 B-17 Stab/JG27 NE Marettimo
75 18.5.1943 13:53 P-38 Stab/JG27 NE Trapani
76 22.5.1943 16:17 B-17 Stab/JG27 10km SE Marettimo
77 22.5.1943 16:22 P-38 Stab/JG27 10km SE Marettimo
78 22.5.1943 16:25 P-38 Stab/JG27 SW Marettimo
79 2.7.1943 - Stab/JG27 NW Melos
80 4.10.1943 12:20 B-24 Stab/JG27 SW Kos
81 8.10.1943 13:48 B-25 Stab/JG27 20km S Levahdia
82 8.10.1943 14:00 P-38 Stab/JG27 N Patras
83 10.10.1943 12:50 B-17 HSS Stab/JG27 Lamia
84 19.3.1944 13:44 B-24 Stab/JG27 SE Graz
85 19.3.1944 14:08 B-24 Stab/JG27 15km SSW Graz
86 2.4.1944 10:45 P-47 Stab/JG27 NW Graz
87 3.4.1944 10:42 B-17 Stab/JG27 15km SSW Budapest
88 12.4.1944 12:03 B-17 Stab/JG27 Wiener Neustadt
89 13.4.1944 11:48 B-17 Stab/JG27 3km S Raab
90 12.5.1944 12:37 B-17 Stab/JG27 E Aschaffenburg
91 12.5.1944 12:47 B-17 Stab/JG27 E Aschaffenburg
92 19.5.1944 13:20 P-51 Stab/JG27 NW Magdeburg
93 19.5.1944 13:20 P-51 Stab/JG27 W Haldensleben
94 29.5.1944 10:15 B-24 Stab/JG27 Sankt-Pölten
95 29.6.1944 11:50 P-47 Stab/JG27 Évreux-Gaillon
96 29.6.1944 11:55 P-47 Stab/JG27 Louviers-Évreux
97 29.6.1944 11:57 P-47 Stab/JG27 Louviers-Évreux
98 5.7.1944 21:05 P-38 Stab/JG27 Angleure

Victories: 98
Awards: Ehrenpokal (14 December 1940)
Deutsches Kreuz in Gold (16 July 1942)
Ritterkreuz (22 June 1941)
Eichenlaub (20 June 1943)
Units: J/88, JG21, JG27

http://www.luftwaffe.cz/rodel.html

Gustav Rodel

Asisbiz Database of 98 aerial victories for Gustav Rodel

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
01-Sep-39 Gustav Rodel 2./JG21 PZL P-24   17.08 Warschau area
12-May-40 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27   10.15 15km S Luttich/Huy
02-Jun-40 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27   09.14 West of Dunkirk
06-Jun-40 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 Potez 63   10.50 NW of Dunkirk
11-Aug-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27   10.40 North of Cap de la Hague
30-Aug-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27   12.28 North of Redhill
01-Sep-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27   15.05 Ashford
01-Sep-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27   15.30 Folkestone
03-Sep-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27   11.20 Southend
03-Sep-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 3000-100m 11.50 Southend
06-Sep-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27      
06-Sep-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27      
06-Sep-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27   10.05 Tunbridge Wells
11-Sep-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27   16.32 Elham
27-Sep-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27   13.05 Milton Regis
27-Sep-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27   16.18 East of London
13-Oct-40 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27      
15-Apr-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 PZL P-24 100-50m 07.05 10km NE Trikkla
15-Apr-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 Hurricane I   06.50 West of Tríkala Greece
15-Apr-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 PZL P-24   06.55 West of Tríkala Greece
20-Apr-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 Hurricane I   16.57 Megara
20-Apr-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 Hurricane I 2500m 17.01 Migalo
20-Apr-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 Hurricane I 2500m 17.08 Migalo
25-Jun-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 SB-3   16.40  
22-Nov-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 1500m 14.05 80km SE Gazala
22-Nov-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.40 SE Bir Hacheim
25-Nov-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 Hurricane I   15.55 N Tobruk
25-Nov-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   15.57 N Tobruk
01-Dec-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27   12.40 SW El Adem
04-Dec-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.18 NE Bir-el-Gobi
05-Dec-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.55 NW Bir-el-Gobi
06-Dec-41 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27   11.55 Tobruk
04-Jan-42 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 1500m 08.40 20km SE Agedabia
27-Mar-42 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   17.10 West of Tobruk
27-Mar-42 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 200m 17.24 SW FlPl Ain-el-Gazala
06-Apr-42 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 800m 08.23 zw Tmimi-Martuba
07-Apr-42 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   15.43 North of Mteifel-Chebir
09-Apr-42 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   14.25 30km SW Mteifel-Chebir
25-Apr-42 Gustav Rodel 4./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.55 6km N Ain-el-Gazala
23-May-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 200m 09.47 40km NE Ras-el-Tin
23-May-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.40 10km N Ras-el-Tin
04-Jun-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 4500m 08.15 3km SE Bir Hacheim
10-Jul-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 1500m 10.40 1km S Murmin Busak
10-Jul-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk 500m 10.37 NE Miteiriga
10-Jul-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 3000m 10.32 6km SW El-Alamein
19-Jul-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27   09.17 Bir Gabatte
19-Jul-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27   09.13 Chebel-el-Gabir
21-Jul-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27   18.12½ NE El-Daba
21-Jul-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 2000m 18.20 4km NE El Taqua
21-Jul-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27   18.12 SSW El-Alamein
21-Jul-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27   18.10 SSW El-Alamein
31-Aug-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 3500m 18.29 15km ssE El-Alamein
01-Sep-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   07.01  
03-Sep-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.20 Deir-el-Raghil
05-Sep-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.53 SSW El-Alamein
05-Sep-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   10.57 SSW El-Alamein
05-Sep-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   11.00 SSW El-Alamein
09-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-39 Aircobra   09.23 North of Turbiya
09-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-39 Aircobra   09.27 NNE El-Daba
09-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-39 Aircobra 4000m 09.35 25km NW Sanyet Quotaifiya
13-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-39 Aircobra   09.39 SSW El-Alamein
22-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 B-25 Mitchell   10.45 SW El-Alamein
24-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.50 West of El-Alamein
24-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.45 WSW El-Alamein
24-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.43 SW El-Alamein
26-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   16.08 SW Sanyet Quotaifiya
27-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-39 Aircobra   15.05 North of El-Daba
27-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.42 SSW El-Alamein
27-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27   09.23 SSW El-Hammam
29-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.05 Deir-el-Bein
31-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.55 SW Sanyet Quotaifiya
31-Oct-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27 P-40 Warhawk   09.52 SW Sanyet Quotaifiya
01-Nov-42 Gustav Rodel Stab II./JG27   07.05 South of Sidi-el-Rahman
18-May-43 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 P-38 Lightning   13.53 NE Trapani
18-May-43 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-17 Fortress II 5500m 13.44 NE Insel Marettimo
22-May-43 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 P-38 Lightning 7000m 16.22 10km SE Marettimo
22-May-43 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 P-38 Lightning 4000m 16.25 SW Marettimo
22-May-43 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-17F 6500m 16.17 10km SE Marettimo
02-Jul-43 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27     NW Insel Melos (Mílos) Aegean
04-Oct-43 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-24 Liberator   12.20 SW Insel Kos (Dodecanese)
08-Oct-43 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-25 Mitchell 3500m 13.48 20km S Levahdia
08-Oct-43 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 P-38 Lightning 2000m 14.00 N Patras
10-Oct-43 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-17 Fortress Hss 6000m 12.50 Lamia
19-Mar-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-24 Liberator 6000m 14.08 15km SSW Graz
19-Mar-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-24 Liberator 7000m 13.44 SE Graz
02-Apr-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 1000m 10.45 NW Graz
03-Apr-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 10.42 15km SSW Budapest
12-Apr-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-17 Fortress   12.03 Wiener Neustadt
13-Apr-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-17 Fortress 7000m 11.48 3km S Raab
12-May-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-17 Fortress 7500m 12.37 05 Ost S/QU-5 (Hammelburg)
12-May-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-17 Fortress   12.47 East of Aschaffenburg
19-May-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 P-51 Mustang   13.20 NW Magdeburg
19-May-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-24 Liberator   13.20 GC-8 (W Haldensleben)
29-May-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 B-24 Liberator 7000m 10.15 Sankt-Polten
29-Jun-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 500m 11.50 05 Ost S/UC (evreux-Gaillon)
29-Jun-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 500m 11.55 05 Ost S/UC (Louviers-Evreux)
29-Jun-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 P-47 Thunderbolt 500m 11.57 05 Ost S/UC (Louviers-Evreux)
05-Jul-44 Gustav Rodel Stab /JG27 P-38 Lightning 3000m 21.05 BH-55 (Angleure S Sezanne)



Erich Wuensch

Units: JG-1

Awards: EK 1 & 2, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109G, Fw 190A

Remarks: Information found on signed print 'Ambush' by Heinz Krebs.

 

 Kastelli, Lasithi, Greece Map

 Rhodes Greece Map

 Kalamaki, Zakinthos, Greece Map

 Trapani Airport, Trapani, Italy Map

 Fels am Wagram, Austria Map

 Tunísia, Tunisia Map

 Achmer, Osnabrück, Germany Map

 Hoya, Germany Map

 Hopstener Straße, Rheine, Germany Map

 Wiesbaden-Erbenheim, Germany Map

 

Spanish Civil War

    Bibliography: +

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  • Bergström, Christer and Martin Pegg. Jagdwaffe:The War in Russia, January–October 1942. Luftwaffe Colours, Volume 3 Section 4. London: Classic Colours Publications, 2003. ISBN 1-903223-23-7.
  • Burke, Stephen. Without Wings: The Story of Hitler's Aircraft Carrier. Oxford, UK: Trafford Publishing, 2007. ISBN 1-4251-2216-7.
  • Caidin, Martin. Me 109 – Willy Messerschmitt's Peerless Fighter (Ballantine's illustrated history of World War II. Weapons book no. 4). New York: Ballantine Books, USA, 1968. ISBN 0-345-01691-2.
  • Caldwell, Donald L. JG 26: Top Guns of the Luftwaffe. New York: Ballantine Books, 1991. ISBN 0-8041-1050-6.
  • Craig, James F. The Messerschmitt Bf.109. New York: Arco Publishing Company, 1968.
  • Cross, Roy and Gerald Scarborough. Messerschmitt Bf 109, Versions B-E. London: Patrick Stevens, 1976. ISBN 0-85059-106-6.
  • Dimensione Cielo: Caccia Assalto 3, Aerei Italiani nella 2a Guerra Mondiale (in Italian). Roma: Edizioni Bizzarri, 1972.
  • Ebert, Hans A., Johann B. Kaiser and Klaus Peters. Willy Messerschmitt: Pioneer of Aviation (The History of German Aviation Design). Atglen, PA: Schiffer Books, 2000. ISBN 0-7643-0727-4.
  • Feist, Uwe. The Fighting Me 109. London: Arms and Armour Press, 1993, ISBN 1-85409-209-X.
  • Fernández-Sommerau, Marco. Messerschmitt Bf 109 Recognition Manual. Hersham, Surrey, UK: Classic Publications, 2004. ISBN 1-903223-27-X.
  • Glancey, Jonathan. Spitfire: The Illustrated Biography. London: Atlantic Books, 2006. ISBN 978-1-84354-528-6.
  • Green, William. Messerschmitt Bf 109: The Augsburg Eagle; A Documentary History. London: Macdonald and Jane's Publishing Group Ltd., 1980. ISBN 0-7106-0005-4.
  • Griehl, Manfred. Das geheime Typenbuch der deutschen Luftwaffe: Geheime Kommandosache 8531/44 gKdos. Friedberg, Germany: Podzun-Pallas Verlag, 2004. ISBN 978-3-7909-0775-9.
  • Griehl, Manfred.Flugzeug Profile. No. 5 – Messerschmitt Bf 109G/K.Rheinfelden, Germany: BPV Medien Vertrieb GmbH & Co KG, 1987.
  • Hitchcock, Thomas H. Messerschmitt 'O-Nine' Gallery. Chicago: Monogram Aviation Publications, 1973. ISBN 978-0-914144-00-7.
  • Hitchcock, Thomas H. Monogram Close-Up Number 9:Bf 109F.Sturbridge, Mass: Monogram Aviation Publications, 1990. ISBN 0-914144-20-0
  • Hooton, Edward R. Blitzkrieg in the West, 1939 -1940 (Luftwaffe at War: 2). Hersham, Surrey, UK: Midland Publishing, 2007. ISBN 978-1-85780-272-6.
  • Kobel, Franz and Jakob Maria Mathmann. Bf 109. Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 1997. ISBN 0-88740-919-9.
  • Mankau, Heinz and Peter Petrick. Messerschmitt Bf 110, Me 210, Me 410. Raumfahrt, Germany: Aviatic Verlag, 2001. ISBN 3-925505-62-8.
  • Marshall, Francis L. Messerschmitt Bf 109T "Die Jäger der Graf Zeppelin". Gilching, Germany: Marshall-Verlag, 2002. ISBN 3-00-008220-4.
  • Marshall, Francis L. Sea Eagles – The Messerschmitt Bf 109T. Walton on Thames, Surrey, UK: Air Research Publications, 1994. ISBN 1-871187-23-0.
  • Mason, Francis K. Messerschmitt Bf 109B, C, D, E in Luftwaffe & Foreign service. London, UK: Osprey Publishing Limited, 1973. ISBN 0-85045-152-3.
  • Massimello, Giovanni and Giorgio Apostolo. Italian Aces of World War Two. Oxford/New York, Osprey Publishing, 2000. ISBN 978-1-84176-078-0.
  • Mermet, Jean-Claude. Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-1 through K-4. Engines and Fittings. Marnaz, France: Jean Claude Mermet SA, 1999.
  • Messerschmitt AG. Messerschmitt Bf 109G; technisch Kompendium, Handbücher, Ersatztelliste, Bewaffnung Bedienungsvorschrift/Fl, Bordfunkanlage, Lehrbildreihe; 1942/1944. [Elektronische Resource] (Reprint) Ludwigsburg, Germany: Luftfahrt-Archiv, 2006. ISBN 3-939847-13-5.
  • Messerschmitt AG. Messerschmitt Bf 109K; technisch Kompendium, Handbüch, Ersatztelliste, Rep.-Answeisung, Bewaffnung Bedienungsvorschrift; 1943–1944. [Elektronische Resource] (Reprint). Ludwigsburg, Germany: Luftfahrt-Archiv, 2006. ISBN 3-939847-14-3.
  • Morgan, Eric B and Edward Shacklady. Spitfire: The History. Stamford: Key Books Ltd, 2000. ISBN 0-946219-48-6.
  • Neulen, Hans Werner. In the Skies of Europe. Ramsbury, Marlborough, UK: The Crowood Press, 2000. ISBN 1-86126-799-1.
  • Nowarra, Heinz. Die Deutsche Luftrustung 1933–1945, Band 3: Flugzeugtypen Henschel – Messerschmitt. Koblenz, Germany: Bernard & Graefe, 1993. ISBN 3-7637-5467-9.
  • Osché, Philippe (translated by Patrick Laureau). The Messerschmitt Bf 109 in Swiss Service. Boulogne sur Mer, France: Lela Presse, 1996. ISBN 2-914017-31-6.
  • Poruba, T and A Janda. Messerschmitt Bf 109K. Hradec Králové, Czech Republic: JaPo, 1997.
  • Prien, Jochen and Peter Rodeike. Messerschmitt Bf 109 F, G & K Series – An Illustrated Study. Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 1995. ISBN 0-88740-424-3.
  • Price, Alfred. Spitfire Mk. I/II Aces (Osprey's Aircraft of the Aces). London: Osprey, 1996. ISBN 84-8372-207-0.
  • Punka, György. "A Messzer": Bf 109s in the Royal Hungarian "Honvéd" Air Force. Budapest, Hungary: OMIKK, 1995. ISBN 963-593-208-1.
  • Radinger, Willy and Walter Schick. Messerschmitt Me 109 (Alle Varianten: vion Bf (Me) 109A bis Me 109E). Oberhaching, Germany: Aviatic Verlag GmbH, 1997. ISBN 3-925505-32-6.
  • Radinger, Willy and Wolfgang Otto. Messerschmitt Bf 109 F-K – Development, testing, production. Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 1999. ISBN 0-7643-1023-2.
  • Rimmell, Ray. ME 109: Messerschmitt Bf 109E. Chipping Ongar, Essex, UK: Linewrights Ltd., 1986. ISBN 0-946958-18-1.
  • Ritger, Lynn. Meserschmitt Bf 109 Prototype to 'E' Variants. Bedford, UK: SAM Publications, 2006. ISBN 978-0-9551858-0-9.
  • Savic, D. and B. Ciglic. Croatian Aces of World War II (Osprey Aircraft of the Aces 49). Oxford, UK: Oxford, 2002. ISBN 1-84176-435-3.
  • Scutts, Jerry. Bf 109 Aces of North Africa and the Mediterranean. Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 1994. ISBN 1-85532-448-2, ISBN 978-1-85532-448-0.
  • Shores, C., B. Cull and N. Malizia. Air War for Yugoslavia, Greece & Crete – 1940–41. London: Grub Street, 1987. ISBN 0-948817-07-0.
  • Starr, Chris. "Developing Power: Daimler-Benz and the Messerschmitt Bf 109." Aeroplane magazine, Volume 33, No. 5, Issue No 385, May 2005. London: IPC Media Ltd.
  • Stenman, Kari and Kalevi Keskinen. Finnish Aces of World War 2 (Osprey Aircraft of the Aces 23). London: Osprey Publishing Limited, 1998. ISBN 1-85532-783-X.
  • Taylor, John W.R. "Messerschmitt Bf 109." Combat Aircraft of the World from 1909 to the present. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1969. ISBN 0-425-03633-2.
  • U.S. Army Air Force. German Aircraft and Armament: Informational Intelligence, Summary No. 44-32, October 1944 (Informational Intelligence Summary). New York: Brassey's Inc., 2000 (first edition 1944). ISBN 1-57488-291-0.
  • Valtonen, Hannu. Messerschmitt Bf 109 ja saksan sotatalous (Messerschmitt Bf 109 and the German war economy). Helsinki, Finland: Keski-Suomen Ilmailumuseo (Central Finnish Aviation Museum), 1999. ISBN 978-951-95688-7-4.
  • Vogt, Harald. Messerschmitt Bf 109 G/K Rüstsatze. Flugzeug Profile 21. Illertissen, Flugzeug Publikations GmbH.
  • Wagner, Ray and Heinz Nowarra. German Combat Planes: A Comprehensive Survey and History of the Development of German Military Aircraft from 1914 to 1945. New York: Doubleday, 1971.
  • Weal, John. Bf 109 Aces of the Russian Front. Oxford: Osprey, 2001. ISBN 978-1-84176-084-1.
  • Weal, John. BF 109D/E Aces 1939–41. Oxford: Osprey, 1996. ISBN 978-1-85532-487-9.
  • Weal, John. Bf 109F/G/K Aces of the Western Front. Oxford: Osprey, 2000. ISBN 978-1-85532-905-8.
  • Winchester, Jim. "Messerschmitt Bf 109." Aircraft of World War II: The Aviation Factfile. Kent, UK: Grange Books plc, 2004. ISBN 1-84013-639-1.

    Messerschmitt Bf 109 operational history Bibliography: +

  • Beale, Nick, Ferdinando D'Amico and Gabriele Valentini. Air War Italy: Axis Air Forces from Liberation of Rome to the Surrender. Shrewsbury, UK: Airlife, 1996. ISBN 1-85310-252-0.
  • Bergström, Christer. Barbarossa – The Air Battle: July–December 1941. London: Chevron/Ian Allan, 2007. ISBN 978-1-85780-270-2.
  • Bergström, Christer and Martin Pegg. Jagdwaffe:The War in Russia, January–October 1942. Luftwaffe Colours, Volume 3 Section 4. London: Classic Colours Publications, 2003. ISBN 1-903223-23-7.
  • Feist, Uwe. The Fighting Me 109. London: Arms and Armour Press, 1993. ISBN 1-85409-209-X.
  • Green, William. Messerschmitt Bf 109: The Augsburg Eagle; A Documentary History. London: Macdonald and Jane's Publishing Group Ltd., 1980. ISBN 0-7106-0005-4.
  • Hooton, Edward R. Blitzkrieg in the West, 1939 -1940 (Luftwaffe at War: 2). Hersham, Surrey, UK: Midland Publishing, 2007. ISBN 978-1-85780-272-6.
  • Jackson, Robert. Aircraft of World War II: Development – Weaponry – Specifications. Enderby, Leicester, UK, Amber Books, 2003. ISBN 1-85605-751-8.
  • Mankau, Heinz and Peter Petrick. Messerschmitt Bf 110, Me 210, Me 410. Raumfahrt, Germany: Aviatic Verlag, 2001. ISBN 3-925505-62-8.
  • Mason, Francis K. Messerschmitt Bf 109B, C, D, E in Luftwaffe & Foreign service. London, UK: Osprey Publishing Limited, 1973. ISBN 0-85045-152-3.
  • Massimello, Giovanni and Giorgio Apostolo. Italian Aces of World War Two. Oxford/New York, Osprey Publishing, 2000. ISBN 978-1-84176-078-0.
  • Morgan, Eric B. and Edward Shacklady. Spitfire: The History. Stamford, UK: Key Books Ltd, 2000. ISBN 0-946219-48-6.
  • Neulen, Hans Werner. In the skies of Europe – Air Forces allied to the Luftwaffe 1939–1945. Ramsbury, Marlborough, THE CROWOOD PRESS, 2000. ISBN 1-86126-799-1
  • Price, Alfred. Spitfire Mark I/II Aces 1939–41 (Aircraft of the Aces 12). London: Osprey Books, 1996, ISBN 1-85532-627-2.
  • Punka, György. "A Messzer": Bf 109s in the Royal Hungarian "Honvéd" Air Force. Budapest, Hungary: OMIKK, 1995. ISBN 963-593-208-1.
  • Savic, D. and B. Ciglic. Croatian Aces of World War II (Osprey Aircraft of the Aces 49). Oxford, UK: Oxford, 2002. ISBN 1-84176-435-3.
  • Stenman, Kari and Kalevi Keskinen. Finnish Aces of World War 2 (Osprey Aircraft of the Aces 23). London: Osprey Publishing Limited, 1998. ISBN 1-85532-783-X.

    Some of the most widely used Book References:

  • Jagdwaffe: Battle of Britain: Phase One: July-August 1940 (Luftwaffe Colours: Volume Two, Section 1) Paperback Eric Mombeek (Author), David Wadman (Author), Eddie J Creek (Author)
  • Jagdwaffe: Battle of Britain: Phase Two: August-September 1940 (Luftwaffe Colours: Volume Two, Section 2) Paperback Eric Mombeek (Author), David Wadman (Author), Martin Pegg (Author)
  • Jagdwaffe: Battle of Britain: Phase Three: September-October 1940 (Luftwaffe Colours: Volume Two, Section 3) Paperback Eric Mombeek (Author), David Wadman (Author), Martin Pegg (Author)
  • Jagdwaffe: Battle of Britain: Phase Four: November 1940-June 1941 (Luftwaffe Colours: Volume Two, Section 4) Paperback Eric Mombeek (Author), David Wadman (Author), Martin Pegg (Author)

    Magazines: +

  • Airfix Magazines (English) - http://www.airfix.com/
  • Avions (French) - http://www.aerostories.org/~aerobiblio/rubrique10.html
  • FlyPast (English) - http://www.flypast.com/
  • Flugzeug Publikations GmbH (German) - http://vdmedien.com/flugzeug-publikations-gmbh-hersteller_verlag-vdm-heinz-nickel-33.html
  • Flugzeug Classic (German) - http://www.flugzeugclassic.de/
  • Klassiker (German) - http://shop.flugrevue.de/abo/klassiker-der-luftfahrt
  • Le Fana de L'Aviation (French) - http://boutique.editions-lariviere.fr/site/abonnement-le-fana-de-l-aviation-626-4-6.html
  • Le Fana de L'Aviation (French) - http://www.pdfmagazines.org/tags/Le+Fana+De+L+Aviation/
  • Osprey (English) - http://www.ospreypublishing.com/
  • Revi Magazines (Czech) - http://www.revi.cz/

    Web References: +

  • Wikipedia.org - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messerschmitt_Bf_109
  • Wikipedia.org - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messerschmitt_Bf_109_variants#cite_ref-100
  • Wikipedia.org - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messerschmitt_Bf_109_operational_history
  • Flickr.com - https://www.flickr.com/photos/farinihouseoflove/2209839419/in/photostream

 

This webpage was updated 8th Marce 2021