Jagdgeschwader 2 'Richthofen' - JG2

Aircrew Luftwaffe ace Erich Mix with Messerschmitt Bf 109E1 Stab JG53 (o+ Germany 1939

Pilots 3./JG2 Erich Mix France 1940 01

Photo 01: After having recovered from wounds, Major Erich Mix retook command of his Gruppe, III./JG2 on 19 June 1940. He then left France with his unit and relocated to Frankfurt / Rhein-Main on 1 July. On 27 July, he returned to Evreux-West. There, the Gruppe stayed until 4 August. Mix remained Gruppenkommandeur of III./JG2 until 24 September 1940.

Pilots 3./JG2 Erich Mix France 1940 02

Photo 01: Fast cars or motorcycles prove an irresistible fascination to most fighter pilots. Here, Major Erich Mix, second left, and other officers of III./JG2 tryout a motorcycle and sidecar combination at Evreux-West,August/ September 1940. Note the emblem of 7./JG2 on the sidecar, presumably applied to discourage the combination being 'requisitioned' by another Staffel.

Pilots 1./JG2 Paul Temme pre war summer 1939 01

Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4 Stab JG2 (+ Paul Temme France 1940

Profile 00:Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4 of Gruppenstab 1./JG2 flown by Oblt. Paul Temme, Gruppenadjutant. The Bf 109E-4 flown by Oblt. Paul Temme of JG2 as it appeared when forced down beside Shoreham airfield early on the morning of 13 August, becoming the first Jagdwaffe casualty of Adlertag. Finished in a scheme of 02 and 71, the fuselage sides show signs of patchy repainting, possibly to cover earlier unit markings or the aircraft Stammkennzeichen, and the Adjutant Chevron was placed higher and further forward than usually seen on Bf 109s of the period. Almost invisible in some photographs, the JG2 shield beneath the windscreen was partially hidden by the paint of the heavily applied mottle on the front of the aircraft. The tip of the spinner was painted red and the undersurface 65 wrapped around the leading edges of the main wings. Three Abschuss bars were painted on the rudder in black, each being surmounted by a small, lighter colored circle.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E Stab JG2 (+ Paul Temme after being shot down Aug 13 1940 01-03

Photo 01-03: On 13 August, several units failed to receive the order delaying Adlerangriff and took off on their pre-arranged missions. One such unit was JG2 which mounted an early morning freie Jagd sweep. Taking part in this operation, despite the fact the engine of his Bf 109E-4 aircraft had not been running satisfactorily the day before, was the Gruppenadjutant of I./JG2, Oblt. Paul Temme. On the 13th his engine was again lacking power, and Temme lagged behind the rest of his formation. When he went to the assistance of a straggling Ju-88, Temme was attacked by two or three Spitfires and crash-landed in a field on the southern edge of Shoreham airfield. Although reported to have had a red painted spinner, tonal contrast suggests only the tip was red.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E Stab JG2 (+ Paul Temme after being shot down Aug 13 1940 04-5

Photo 04-05: Paul Temme's Bf 109E-4 attracts a crowd of interested onlookers while on display in the East London Borough of Hackney during the latter part of August 1940. The newspaper caption refers to the practice of reducing crashed enemy aircraft to scrap and melting down the remains in order to obtain new raw materials.

Geschwader Stab Jagdgeschwader 2 ‘Richthofen'

Artwork showing a map of the flight route 0A

Artwork showing a painting by Roy Cross of Bf 109E4 I/.JG2 Helmut Wick Battle of Britain 1940 0A

Artwork showng the personal emblem Helmut Wick JG2 0A

Messerschmitt Bf 109E1 Stab JG2 (1-+- Gerd von Massow Germnay 1939 0A

Messerschmitt Bf 109E1 Stab JG2 bogged down in snow Zerbst Saxony Anhalt Germany 1939 40 01-02

Messerschmitt Bf 109E JG2 (+ Harry von Bulow-Bothkamp France 1940 01-02

Photo 02-03: Oberstleutnant Harry von Bulow-Bothkamp, Kommodore of JG2 seen here wearing the 'Kabok-Schwimmweste' sits in the cockpit of his Bf 109 at the end of July 1940. Note the Script 'R' 'Richthofen' Geschwader emblem.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E Stab I/.JG2 ((+- Hptm. Karl-Heinz Greisert France Sep 1940 01

Photo 01: Two yellow-nosed Bf 109s from II./JG2 taxi out at the start of a new mission in late September. The aircraft in the background carries the doublechevron marking of the Gruppenkommandeur, Hptm. Karl-Heinz Greisert, who took command of the Gruppe on 3 September. Oblt. Greisert's first victory, a Fairey Battle, was claimed during the French campaign.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E3 Jagdgeschwader 2 Winkel Balken France early 1940 01

Messerschmitt Bf 109E Stab JG2 (-+- Wilhelm Balthasar Nov 1940 01

Messerschmitt Bf 109E Geschwader Stab JG2 ((+Helmut Wick France Oct 1940 0A

Messerschmitt Bf 109E Geschwader Stab JG2 ((+Helmut Wick WNr 5344 France 1940 0A

Profile 00: Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4, W.Nr. 5344, flown by Major Helmut Wick, Kommodore of JG2 'Richthofen' This aircraft is depicted as it appeared shortly before Wick was lost during combat over the English Channel on 28 November 1940. The earlier Gruppenkommandeur's markings have been painted out and Kommodore's insignia applied, and the fuselage Balkenkreuz has been modified with wider black outer corner segments. The yellow spinner retains a white backplate and Wick's small bird emblem appears over the lower arm of the chevron. Wick's victory tally was constantly being updated and his ground crew finally replaced, or repainted, the rudder with the 54 victory tabs arranged to form a solid panel, as shown. Before Wick's last mission, however, the yellow areas of the rudder were further modified with the same green stipple as seen on the fuselage.

Stab I Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 2 ‘Richthofen' - Stab I./JG2

Messerschmitt Bf 109E Stab I/.JG2 Helmut Wick tail showing 28 kills France 1940 01

Messerschmitt Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 (-+ Helmut Wick WNr 5344 France 1940 01-0D

Photo's 01-05: Wick's aircraft when Kommodore of JG2. Clearly visible in some views are the areas where Wick's previous Kommandeur markings have been oversprayed and in the bird emblem has been re-applied. Note also that the rudder markings have been completely revised to run from top to bottom and that eventually the whole rudder was completely repainted a bright yellow and the 54 victory bars regrouped. The photographs show the rudder again but modified with the addition of the same stipple as applied to the fuselage.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E4 Stab I/.JG2 ((+ Helmut Wick WNr 5344 emblem 1940 01

Photo's 01-02: The personal emblem beneath and behind the cockpit.

Photo 01: Wick's aircraft when Kommandeur of I./JG2. Note the 42 victories recorded on the rudder.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 (-+- Helmut Wick W.Nr 5344 France 1940 00

Photo 01: Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4, W.Nr. 5344, flown by Major Helmut Wick, Kommodore of JG2 'Richthofen' This aircraft is depicted as it appeared shortly before Wick was lost during combat over the English Channel on 28 November 1940. The earlier Gruppenkommandeur's markings have been painted out and Kommodore's insignia applied, and the fuselage Balkenkreuz has been modified with wider black outer corner segments. The yellow spinner retains a white backplate and Wick's small bird emblem appears over the lower arm of the chevron. Wick's victory tally was constantly being updated and his ground crew finally replaced, or repainted, the rudder with the 54 victory tabs arranged to form a solid panel, as shown. Before Wick's last mission, however, the yellow areas of the rudder were further modified with the same green stipple as seen on the fuselage.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 (-+- Helmut Wick W.Nr 5344 France 1940 01-05

Photo's 01-05: Wick's aircraft when Kommodore of JG2. Clearly visible in some views are the areas where Wick's previous Kommandeur markings have been oversprayed and in the bird emblem has been re-applied. Note also that the rudder markings have been completely revised to run from top to bottom and that eventually the whole rudder was completely repainted a bright yellow and the 54 victory bars regrouped. The photographs show the rudder again but modified with the addition of the same stipple as applied to the fuselage.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 (-+- Helmut Wick W.Nr 5344 France 1940 06

Photo 01: Ground staff with Wick's recently repainted yellow rudder, marked with 54 victory bars.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4 Stab JG2 ((+ Helmut Wick W.Nr 5344 France 1940

Photo 01: Wick's aircraft marked with 28 kills. Note that, as shown here, the victory tabs do not run chronologically from top to bottom, the solitary uppermost tab being the latest, applied after the last in the bottom row.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4 JG2 (+-+- Helmut Wick second aircraft France 1940

Photo 01: The machine parked in the background of this photograph is believed to have been Wick's reserve aircraft. In order to distinguish it from his normal machine, the Kommodore's insignia has been modified to include a vertical bar. Unfortunately, the Werk Nummer of this aircraft is not known.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4 Geschwader Stab JG2 ((+Helmut Wick W.Nr 5344 engine run-up France 1940 01

Photo 01: Major Wick running up the engine of his Bf 109E. Note that although the machine was very well maintained it had served Wick for some months and was beginning to show signs of heavy use. At one time, the spinner and cowling of this aircraft were painted white. When repainted yellow, these components were removed so that, when replaced, the spinner backplate remained white, as may be seen in this view. The DB601 engine was generally regarded as a very clean engine and did not normally leak oil, but the stains on the lower cowling indicate where, on this aircraft, oil has seeped through the panel joints. Wick always entered combat at full throttle and wore out engines abnormally quickly.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E7Z Stab I.JG2 this maybe Erich Leie WNr 1420 France 29th April 1941

Photo 01: The shot was taken in any case after November 28, 1940 as the day the Colonel Helmut Wick was shot down. The machine shown is not his. Note the open access cover in the fuselage through which could even get to the pressure cylinders for the GM-1 system. Luftwaffe pilot Erich Leie in his flight log made an entry from 29th April 1941 in which he did a familiarization flight on a Bf 109 E-7 / Z WNr 1420 and reached an altitude of 10,500 m. [Q 83] /S.75.

Source: http://www.bf-109.com/display.php?lang=en&auth=e&name=version_display&fotonummer=7997 his photo reference 7997

Stab II Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 2 ‘Richthofen' - Stab II./JG2

Messerschmitt Bf 109E3 Stab II./JG2 (-+- Geschwaderkommodore Harry von Bulow-Bothkamp France 1940

Messerschmitt Bf 109E.3 of Stab/JG2 The Bf 109E-3 of Major Harry von Bulow-Bothkamp the Geschwaderkommodore of JG2, illustrates an example of the heavily stippled mottle applied to the blue 65 sides of JG2 aircraft during the summer of 1940.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E Stab II./JG2 (-+- Harry von Bulow-Bothkamp France 1940 01

Photo 01: Oberstleutnant Harry von Bulow-Bothkamp is helped with his life vest by a member of the ground crew.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E Stab II./JG2 (-+- Harry von Bulow-Bothkamp France 1940 03

Photo 03: Oberstleutnant Harry von Bulow-Bothkamp's Bf 109E-3 belonging to Stab JG2 is surrounded by tools, paint pots and engine covers at an unidentified airfield on the Channel Front in late July 1940.The original photograph was marked 'damaged aircraft'.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E4 Stab II./JG2 TO Gunther Domaschk Nordholz Germany

Photo 01: Gunther Domaschk was the acting Technical Officer in Stab II./JG2 when this photo was taken in Nordholz on . Nordholz is a municipality in the district of Cuxhaven, in Lower Saxony, Germany. It is situated approximately 25 km north of Bremerhaven, and 12 km southwest of Cuxhaven. Nordholz belonged to the Prince-Archbishopric of Bremen, established in 1180.

Stab III Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 2 ‘Richthofen' - Stab III./JG2

Messerschmitt Bf 109E4 Stab III/.JG2 ((+~ Erich Mix France June 1940 01-04

Messerschmitt Bf 109E4 Stab III/.JG2 ((+~ Erich Mix WNr 1526 France June 1940 01-0B

Messerschmitt Bf 109E3 Stab III/.JG2 ((+~ Erich Mix WNr 1526 France June 1940 0A

Photo 01-02: After being hospitalized when he was shot down on 21 May, Dr. Erich Mix returned to III./JG2 on 19 June. Once back in France, he took the opportunity to visit the wreck of his Bf 109E-3 W.Nr 1526 where it still lay in a field near Roye. Clearly visible in these photographs are the black-outlined Gruppe symbol and the Geschwader shield with its stylized 'R' (for 'Richthofen', the Geschwader's honor title) which had been designed for the unit by Leutnant Rotkirch. He was shot down by a French MS 406 from GC I/6.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E3 Stab III/.JG2 (+~ France 1940 0A

Messerschmitt Bf 109E4 Stab III/.JG2 (+~ Adolf Steidle France 1940 0A

Messerschmitt Bf 109E3 Stab III/.JG2 Christian von Schlieffen France Dec 1940 01

Messerschmitt Bf 109E Stab III/.JG2 (+~ Oblt. Adolf Steidle Adjutant France 1940 01

Photo: The Bf 109E-3 of the Adjutant of III./JG2, Oblt. Adolf Steidle, which was lost on 11 August after crashing near Cherbourg following combat over the Channel with RAF fighters. Photo 1: Taken in France during June-July, this photograph shows the cowlings 7./JG2 Bf 109Es which have been removed prior to the application of the Staffel emblem. Designed by Ofw. Erwin Klee and Lt. Hans Schmidt, the emblem consisted of a thumb pressing down onto a top hat. Note the stencil for the emblem lying on top of the compressed air bottles and spraying equipment in the foreground. The Bf 109E in the background bearing the single large chevron is believed to be the aircraft in which the Gruppenadjutant of II.Gruppe, Oblt. Adolf Steidle, lost his life near Cherbourg on 11 August 1940.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E Stab III/.JG2 (+~ Oblt Adolf Steidle France 1940 0A

Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4 JG2 'Richthofen' <+-+- flown by Erich Leie France 1940

Messerschmitt Bf 109E JG2 (+ during the Battle of France France July 1940

Photo 01: A Bf 109E belonging to the Gruppenadjutant of JG2 seen on the Channel Front in July 1940. Note the aircraft carries the chevron of the Gruppenadjudant which appears to be in the uncommon color of yellow.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E JG2 (o+ over the English Channel 1940 01

Bf 109Es from the Stab of JG2 over the English Channel. German fighter pilots increasingly came to regard the Straits of Dover as a very formidable barrier, particularly on their return journey, and it worried them even more than the return journey across the North Sea from Scapa Flow had concerned the crews of KG26 and KG30 earlier in 1940.

Messerschmitt Bf 109E JG2 (-+ over the English Channel 1940 01

Photo 01: Bf 109Es from the Stab of JG2 over the English Channel. German fighter pilots increasingly came to regard the Straits of Dover as a very formidable barrier, particularly on their return journey, and it worried them even more than the return journey across the North Sea from Scapa Flow had concerned the crews of KG26 and KG30 earlier in 1940.

 
 IL-2 Sturmovik 'Cliff's of Dover' - COD game skins
COD game skin by asisbiz Bf 109E4 Stab III/.JG2 Erich Mix WNr 1526 France May 1940
COD game skin by asisbiz Bf 109E4 Stab III/.JG2 Erich Mix WNr 1526 France May 1940 LB
COD game skin by NN Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 ((+ Helmut Wick France Sep 1940 SNM
COD game skin by CF Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 ((+ Helmut Wick France Oct 1940
COD game skin by CF Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 ((+ Helmut Wick France Oct 1940 NM
COD game skin by CF Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 ((+ Helmut Wick France Sep 1940
COD game skin by CF Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 ((+ Helmut Wick France Sep 1940 NM
COD game skin by CF Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 (-+ Helmut Wick France Nov 1940
COD game skin by CF Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 (-+ Helmut Wick France Nov 1940 NM
Bf109E-3 skin for Il-2 Sturmovik - Cliffs of Dover by Cpt Farrel
This aircraft was flown by Helmut Wick, Gruppenkommandeur of I./JG2, September 28, 1940
This aircraft was flown by Helmut Wick, Gruppenkommandeur of I./JG2, October 5, 1940
To install: Place the skin in your Cliffs of Dover folder: C:\Documents\1C SoftClub\il-2 sturmovik cliffs of dover\PaintSchemes\Skins\Bf-109E-3
CF cptfarrels http://www.cptfarrels.com/
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E3 Stab JG2 (-+ Harry von Bulow Bothkamp France 1940
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E3 Stab JG2 (-+ Harry von Bulow Bothkamp France 1940 NC
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E3 Stab JG2 (-+ Harry von Bulow Bothkamp France 1940 NM
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E3 Stab JG2 (-+ Harry von Bulow Bothkamp France 1940 SNM
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E4 I/.JG2 (+ Paul Temme France 1940
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E4 I/.JG2 (+ Paul Temme France 1940 EM
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E4 I/.JG2 (+ Paul Temme France 1940 NC
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E4 I/.JG2 (+ Paul Temme France 1940 NM
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E4 Stab I/.JG2 (-+ Erich Leie France 1940
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E4 Stab I/.JG2 (-+ Erich Leie France 1940 NC
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E4 Stab I/.JG2 (-+ Erich Leie France 1940 NM
COD game skin by ES Bf 109E4 Stab I/.JG2 (-+ Erich Leie France 1940 SNM
ES Erik Schramm http://www.adlerhorst-hangar.com/
COD game skin by OD Bf 109E1 Stab JG2 (1 + Gerd von Massow France 1940
OD oddeball http://forum.1cpublishing.eu/showthread.php?t=27930
COD game skin by WN Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 ((+ Helmut Wick France Oct 1940
COD game skin by WN Bf 109E4 Geschwader Stab JG2 (-+ Helmut Wick France 1940
WN Wonton the Cat Slayer http://forum.aviaskins.com/

 

Luftwaffe Badge

Luftwaffe pilot Geschwaderkommodore Harry von Bülow-Bothkamp

Units: Kdr II./JG-77 (1/40 Jever), Kdr JG-2 (4/40-9/40 Evreux-Fauville), Stab/Jafu 3 (9/40), Kdr NJS-1 (11/42), Kdr NJG-101 (7/43), 4. Jagddiv.(4/44), Kdr S.Kdo von Bülow (1/45)

Awards: RK(8/22/40), WW I EK 1 w/'39 Clasp, Glider Badge, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109E-4's <<-+-' in JG-77 & JG-2

Remarks: Channel pilot. His 6 victories were in WWI where he led JG 'Boelke'. Deceased 27 (or 12th) February, 1976 in Kirchbarbkau.

Luftwaffe Badge

Luftwaffe pilot Günther Domaschk

Units: Stfkpt 3./JG-2 (9/39), Stab TO II./JG-2 (4/40), JG-53, Luftwaffe General Staff at wars end

Awards: Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109E-4 '< x+-'

Remarks: Deceased 11 September, 2002.

Knights Cross

Luftwaffe pilot Karl Heinz 'Heino' Greisert

Units: 2./JG-2(5/40), Kdr II./JG-2(11/40-2/41 Beaumont-le-Roger), Stab III./JG-3(5/42 S.U.)

Awards: Spanish Cross, DK-G(6/5/42), EP, EK 1 & 2, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109E, Fw 190A-2, Bf 109F-4 (Trop 7/42), Bf 109F-4 WNr 8652 'Black <<+I' (lost 7/22/42)

Remarks: KIA 22 July, 1942 in his F-4 during low level aerial combat with an I-16 Rata at Map Quadrant Pl.Qu. 1817 (S.U.). He managed to bail out, but he was too low for his chute to open, and was killed. Served in the Legion Condor (Spain) in 2/J88, scoring one victory. One known victory, his 1st, a Battle in the Sedan/Bouillon area, 14 May, 1940. His 2nd, a Hurricane at La Basse, 23 May, 1940. His 3rd, a Morane 406 S of Bapaume on 25 May, 1940. His 4th, a Hawk-75 N of Soissons on 6 June, 1940. His 5th, a Hawk-75A on 15 June, 1940, no location. A 'damaged' Spitfire over the Isle of Wight on 18 July, 1940. His 6th, a Spitfire S of London on 20 September, 1940. His 7th, a Spitfire near London on 23 September, 1940. His 8th, a Spitfire over England on 26 September, 1940. His 9th, a Hurricane S of Bournemouth on 1 October, 1940. His 10th, a Hurricane S of Portland on 7 October, 1940. His 15th, a Spitfire on 4 July, 1941, no location. His 20th, a Spitfire near Dieppe on 20 September, 1941. A Lancaster I of RAF No. 44 Sq. at Eure, WNW of Evreux, on 17 April, 1942. His first known Soviet victory, an Il-2 on 26 May, 1942. A LaGG-3 and a MiG-3 on 28 June, 1942. A Il-2 on 1 July, 1942. A BB-22 on 4 July, 1942.

Luftwaffe pilot Asisbiz database list of 39 aerial victories for Karl-Heinz Greisert

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
Tuesday, May 14, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert 2./JG2 Fairey Battle   17:15 Sedan-Bouillon
Thursday, May 23, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert 2./JG2 2500m 14:15 La Bassee
Saturday, May 25, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert 2./JG2 Morane 406 2000m 16:10 South of Bapaume
Thursday, June 06, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert 2./JG2 Hawk-75   13:15 North of Soissons
Saturday, June 15, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert 2./JG2 Hawk-75   07:45  
Thursday, July 18, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert 2./JG2   11:20 Isle of Wight
Friday, September 20, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2 5500m 12:10 South of London
Monday, September 23, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   10:30  
Thursday, September 26, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   17:40 -
Tuesday, October 01, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2 Hurricane   12:00 South of Bournemouth
Monday, October 07, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2 Hurricane   16:50 South of Portland
Tuesday, October 15, 1940 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2 Spitfire   13:35 Southampton
Sunday, April 06, 1941 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   16:00 Brest
Saturday, June 21, 1941 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2     Boulogne-Hardelot
Sunday, June 22, 1941 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   16:15 -
Friday, July 04, 1941 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   15:10  
Friday, July 04, 1941 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   15:10 -
Thursday, July 24, 1941 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   12:30  
Saturday, August 16, 1941 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   13:53 -
Tuesday, August 19, 1941 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   12:01  
Tuesday, August 26, 1941 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   19:17  
Saturday, September 20, 1941 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   16:50  
Saturday, September 27, 1941 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2   15:30 Le Touquet
Thursday, February 12, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2 Swordfish 50m 13:50 2258/05 Ost
Thursday, February 12, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2 Swordfish   13:46 Sea 10km N Gravelines
Friday, April 17, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2 Lancaster   17:06  
Friday, April 17, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab II./JG2 Lancaster   17:06 le Tilleul-Lambert/Eure (44Sqn)
Tuesday, May 26, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 Il-2 Sturmovik   15:00  
Tuesday, May 26, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 Il-2 Sturmovik 800m 15:00 15km SE Balakleya
Sunday, June 28, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 LaGG-3   12:00  
Sunday, June 28, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 MiG-3   17:10  
Wednesday, July 01, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 Il-2 Sturmovik   13:15  
Saturday, July 04, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 BB-22   19:27  
Tuesday, July 07, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 Il-2 Sturmovik   18:15  
Thursday, July 09, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 Il-2 Sturmovik   19:20  
Thursday, July 09, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 Il-2 Sturmovik 30m 19:23 Voronezh
Monday, July 13, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 Il-2 Sturmovik   12:40  
Thursday, July 16, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 P-2   17:20  
Thursday, July 16, 1942 Karl-Heinz Greisert Stab III./JG3 P-2   17:25  

Knights Cross

Luftwaffe pilot Erich Leie

Units: Stfkpt 5./JG-51 (10/39), Kdr I./JG-51, III./JG-2 (5/40), Kdr I./JG-2 ('41 Channel), Kdr JG-77

Awards: RK(8/1/41), DK-G(11/9/42), EK 1 & 2, Wound Badge, Fighter Operational Clasp w/Pendant

Known Aircraft: Bf 109D, E, F-4 '<-+I' (10/41 in JG-2),Fw 190A-3 WNr 130326 (lost 8/19/42), Bf 109G-14/AS WNr786329 'Black <1+-' (lost 3/7/45)

Remarks: KIA 7 March, 1945 in Bf 109G-14/AS Werk # 786329 'Black <1+' near Schwarzwasser/Hultschin, Cz., when he collided with a shot-down Yak-9, and tried to to bale out with 200 feet of altitude. Bailed successfully over Dieppe, with wounds, from his A-3 on 19 August, 1942, the victim of an RAF Spitfire.1 Bomber. Wiese successor. Was nominated for the EL. 500 combat missions; 43 victories in the West, 1 four engine bomber. His first victory, a Blenheim 12 km east of Sedan, 14 May, 1940, while in Stab III/JG-2. While Kdr I/JG-2, bailed with wounds 19 August, 1942 near Abbeville after aerial combat with fighters. His first known Soviet victory, two Il-2's on 10 September, 1942. A Soviet Pe-2 on 16 March, 1943. Two Il-2's and a LaGG-3 on 29 July, 1943. Four Il-2's on 8 August, 1943. Nos. 85-89, three Yak-9's and a LaGG-5 on 5 October, 1943, near Orscha. His 115th victory, and Il-2 between Freistadt and Bielitz on 14 February, 1945. His 116th, an La-5 near Freistadt on 20 February, 1945. His last two victories, nos. 117 & 118, the same day of his death, an La-5 and a Yak-9, 7 March, 1945. Showing service in JG-26 per Les Butler (Pilot List).

Luftwaffe pilot Asisbiz database list of 129 aerial victories for Erich Leie

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
Tuesday, May 14, 1940 Erich Leie Stab III./JG2   19:20 12km E Sedan
Saturday, October 05, 1940 Erich Leie Stab I./JG2 Hurricane   14:58 S Bournemouth
Tuesday, October 29, 1940 Erich Leie Stab /JG2 Hurricane   15:29 Portsmouth
Tuesday, November 05, 1940 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   14:40 NE Portland
Tuesday, November 05, 1940 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   14:35 NE Portland
Wednesday, November 06, 1940 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   15:35 Southampton
Wednesday, November 06, 1940 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   15:37 Southampton
Thursday, November 07, 1940 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   15:25 S Portsmouth
Thursday, November 07, 1940 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   15:25 S Portsmouth
Sunday, November 10, 1940 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   15:43 E Portland
Thursday, November 28, 1940 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   15:17 S Isle of Wight
Sunday, June 22, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   16:10 St Omer/Arques
Tuesday, June 24, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   20:55  
Tuesday, June 24, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   20:57  
Wednesday, June 25, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   16:30 Sea NE Boulogne
Sunday, July 06, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   14:35  
Wednesday, July 23, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   13:28 Calais-Dover
Wednesday, July 23, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   20:47 20km W Berck-sur-Mer
Wednesday, July 23, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   20:43 SW Berck-sur-Mer
Wednesday, July 23, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   20:35 West of Hesdin
Wednesday, July 23, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   13:21 ostw Dover
Wednesday, July 23, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   20:39 West of Hesdin
Sunday, August 10, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   14:25 14km N Calais
Tuesday, August 12, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   12:54  
Tuesday, August 12, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   13:08  
Tuesday, August 12, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   19:28 12km SE Dungeness
Thursday, August 21, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2 5500m 15:15 zw Etaples u Berck-sur-Mer
Friday, August 22, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   15:00 St Pol
Monday, October 13, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   14:43 25km W Boulogne
Monday, October 13, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   14:40 15km W Boulogne
Monday, October 13, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   15:40 5km WNW Etaples
Saturday, November 08, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   12:30 Somme-Mundung
Monday, December 08, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   15:45 35km W Boulogne
Tuesday, December 30, 1941 Erich Leie Stab /JG2 Halifax 4000m 15:30 14 West N/49/1/1
Thursday, January 08, 1942 Erich Leie Stab /JG2 Hudson   10:09 PlQu 6927/14W
Monday, January 26, 1942 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   13:40 15 West S/60/4/2 (off Rame Head)
Monday, February 02, 1942 Erich Leie Stab /JG2 Beaufort   19:05 18km NNW Brigogan Plage
Saturday, April 25, 1942 Erich Leie Stab /JG2 5000m 16:45 25km W Le Crotoy
Friday, May 01, 1942 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   19:37  
Friday, May 01, 1942 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   19:40  
Tuesday, May 19, 1942 Erich Leie Stab /JG2 5200m 15:23 40km N Fecamp
Tuesday, June 02, 1942 Erich Leie Stab I./JG2 6000m 17:45 20km ssE Eastbourne
Tuesday, June 02, 1942 Erich Leie Stab I./JG2   17:45  
Tuesday, June 02, 1942 Erich Leie Stab /JG2 6000m 17:45 20km ssE Eastbourne
Tuesday, June 02, 1942 Erich Leie Stab I./JG2   17:45  
Wednesday, June 03, 1942 Erich Leie Stab I./JG2   16:31 Sea off Le Havre
Wednesday, June 03, 1942 Erich Leie Stab I./JG2   16:39  
Friday, June 05, 1942 Erich Leie Stab /JG2   15:35  
Friday, June 26, 1942 Erich Leie Stab I./JG2   17:44 Fecamp-etretat
Wednesday, August 19, 1942 Erich Leie Stab I./JG2   11:50  
Thursday, September 10, 1942 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik   13:56 44 721
Thursday, September 10, 1942 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik   14:00 44 766
Tuesday, February 02, 1943 Erich Leie 7./JG51 MiG-3 3000m 14:05 7376
Thursday, February 04, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik 1000m 12:10 63 632
Friday, February 05, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik   14:25 73 551
Tuesday, March 16, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Pe-2 7500m 11:47 44 593
Tuesday, June 08, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-7 Low Level 19:35 53 423
Monday, July 05, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik 80m 18:44 63 534
Sunday, July 11, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 P-39 Aircobra 900m 19:00 63 576
Tuesday, July 13, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik 400m 13:44 63 255
Tuesday, July 13, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik 200m 13:45 64 894
Tuesday, July 13, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik 400m 14:05 63 213
Tuesday, July 13, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-1 150m 18:52 64 878
Thursday, July 29, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik Low Level 18:55 64 755
Thursday, July 29, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik 800m 16:57 54 648
Thursday, July 29, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-3 900m 16:28 54 655
Saturday, July 31, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-5 1600m 11:49 64 548
Sunday, August 01, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik 3000m 10:10 53522
Sunday, August 01, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-1 2000m 18:45 53 446
Monday, August 02, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Pe-2 4700m 10:05 53 528
Wednesday, August 04, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-5 900m 16:59 53 355
Friday, August 06, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 1200m 16:59 54 599
Saturday, August 07, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 600m 14:06 54 733
Saturday, August 07, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-3 700m 14:00 54 762
Saturday, August 07, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 600m 14:05 54 736
Sunday, August 08, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 150m 16:32 35 423
Sunday, August 08, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 200m 16:41 35 491
Sunday, August 08, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 250m 16:45 35 636
Sunday, August 08, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 300m 16:46 45 514
Thursday, August 12, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-5 4000m 12:50 51 574
Thursday, August 12, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-5 3200m 13:25 51 387
Friday, August 13, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-5 2000m 16:55 50 289
Tuesday, September 07, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-3 900m 12:29 35 899
Thursday, September 09, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-5 4000m 15:40 34 235
Friday, September 10, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 200m 13:53 44 412
Friday, September 10, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 100m 13:56 44 728
Friday, September 10, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. Low Level 14:00 44 766
Saturday, September 11, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-7B 2500m 11:10 44 229
Saturday, September 11, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. Low Level 11:32 44 769
Wednesday, September 15, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 500m 13:20 35 378
Wednesday, September 15, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-5 900m 13:25 25 495
Wednesday, September 15, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Pe-2 1100m 13:40 25 466
Wednesday, September 15, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-5 1200m 09:34 35 348
Friday, September 17, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 5000m 11:32 35 511
Monday, October 04, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-1 4800m 15:51 15 318
Tuesday, October 05, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 400m 10:46 06 891 (Raum Orscha)
Tuesday, October 05, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-5 3800m 15:19 15 378
Tuesday, October 05, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 Low Level 10:48 06 833 (Raum Orscha)
Tuesday, October 05, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 400m 10:47 06 868 (Raum Orscha)
Wednesday, October 06, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-3 700m 12:08 06 152
Wednesday, October 06, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Re-2 1200m 15:42 06 219
Friday, October 15, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 4200m 07:53 15 617
Wednesday, October 20, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 1200m 15:20 03 876
Friday, October 22, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 2000m 11:49 02 227
Friday, October 22, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 2200m 11:44 02 246
Saturday, October 23, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 2300m 15:29 05 463
Friday, October 29, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 800m 12:24 05 451
Saturday, November 06, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-5 1200m 15:00 01 754
Saturday, November 06, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H 1200m 15:03 01 756
Saturday, November 06, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 1200m 15:05 01 738
Saturday, November 06, 1943 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 LaGG-5 4500m 15:15 01 677
Wednesday, March 29, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-7 1200m 12:37 04 457
Saturday, April 01, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 2100m 12:16 04 593
Saturday, April 08, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 3500m 09:30 42 688
Monday, September 04, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 800m 17:19 14 871
Tuesday, September 05, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-7 700m 16:14 13 344
Tuesday, September 05, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 150m 16:17 13 347
Wednesday, September 06, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 100m 15:02 13 348
Monday, October 09, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 600m 13:01 26 858
Monday, October 09, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 300m 16:00 26 872
Friday, October 13, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Pe-2 5500m 13:36 25 134
Saturday, October 14, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 1200m 15:42 16 176
Saturday, October 14, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 1000m 15:12 16 624
Saturday, October 14, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Il-2 Sturmovik m.H. 1000m 15:13 16 655
Monday, October 16, 1944 Erich Leie Stab I./JG51 Yak-9 1000m 13:05 25 621
Wednesday, February 14, 1945 Erich Leie StabJG77 Il-2   16:13 zwischen Freistadt-Bielitz
Tuesday, February 20, 1945 Erich Leie StabJG77 La-5 1600 16:29 bei Freistadt
Wednesday, March 07, 1945 Erich Leie StabJG77 La-5   14:56 Pl.Qu. 80291
Wednesday, March 07, 1945 Erich Leie StabJG77 Yak-9   15:30 Pl.Qu. 80256

Luftwaffe Badge

Luftwaffe pilot Erich Mix

Units: I./JG-334, Stab I./JG-53 (9/39), Kdr III./JG-2 (8/40 Le Harve-Octeville), Kdr JG-1

Awards: EK 1 & 2, Wound Badge, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109B in JG-334, Bf 109D in '39, Bf 109E-1 '<o' in JG-53, Bf 109E-3 '<<' (5/40) in III/JG-2, Bf 109F-4/B WNr 7059 (dam 7/41)

Remarks: WWI pilot with 3 victories. Channel pilot shot down and forced landed his severly damaged 109E in France 21 May, 1940. One known victory, his 1st, a Morane near Saargemünd, 21 September, 1939. His 2nd & 3rd, both Moranes south of Saarbrücken, 22 November, 1939. A 4th, a Morane at Becquigny, E of Boussicourt on 21 May, 1940. A 5th, a Hurricane over England on 9 September, 1940. A 6th, a Blenheim 10 km W of Den Haag on 7 July, 1941. Bowers/Lednicer, 16 victories.

Luftwaffe pilot Asisbiz database of aerial victories for Erich Mix

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
21-Sep-39 Erich Mix Stab I./JG53 Morane   16.15  
21-Sep-39 Erich Mix Stab I./JG53 Morane   16.15 Saargemund
21-Sep-39 Erich Mix Stab I./JG53 Morane   16.15 Saargemund
22-Nov-39 Erich Mix Stab I./JG53 Morane     S Saarbrucken
22-Nov-39 Erich Mix Stab I./JG53 Morane     S Saarbrucken
22-Nov-39 Erich Mix Stab I./JG53 Morane     S Saarbrucken
22-Nov-39 Erich Mix Stab I./JG53 Morane     S Saarbrucken
21-May-40 Erich Mix Stab III./JG2 Morane 1600m 10.55 Becquigny E Boussicourt
21-May-40 Erich Mix Stab III./JG2 Morane 1600m 10.55 Becquigny
21-May-40 Erich Mix Stab III./JG2 Morane 1600m 10.55 Becquigny E Boussicourt
09-Sep-40 Erich Mix Stab III./JG2   19.40  
07-Jul-41 Erich Mix Fhr.d.JagdKr.   12.45 100km W. Den Haag

Luftwaffe Badge

Luftwaffe pilot Gerhard Albrecht von Massow

Awards: WWI EK 1, Wound Badge, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109D & E-1 & Bf 109E-3 '(-1+-' in JG-2(1/40)

Remarks: WWI pilot. Second Kdr of JG-2, 1936-1940.

Luftwaffe Badge

Luftwaffe pilot Adolf Steidle

Units: ?

Awards: ?

Known Aircraft: ?

Remarks: ?

Luftwaffe pilot Asisbiz database of aerial victories for Adolf Steidle

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
06-Jun-40 Adolf Steidle Stab III./JG2 Bloch 152   20.42 Noyon

Luftwaffe Badge

Luftwaffe pilot Paul Temme

Units: 2./JG-2, Stab I./JG-2 (5/40), Adj II./JG-2 (Channel)

Awards: EK 1 & 2, Fighter Operational Clasp

Known Aircraft: Bf 109E-1 'White 5'(9/39), Bf 109E-4 WNr 5068 '< +' (lost 8/13/40)

Remarks: POW 13 August, 1940. Most likely hit by a Hurricane from RAF No. 43 Sq., he belly-landed his E-4 in a cornfield alongside the Shoreham airfield. Interned in Canada. One known victory, his 1st, a Potez 63 south of Sedan, 15 May, 1940. His 2nd & 3rd, both Spitfires southwest of Calais on 26 May, 1940. His 4th, a Blenheim thought to be from RAF No. 139 Sq., N of Le Harve, on 2 August, 1940. His 5th, a Hurricane SE of Portsmouth on 11 August, 1940. His 6th, a Spitfire over England on 13 August, 1940. Deceased 29 March, 1998.

Luftwaffe pilot 6 Aerial Victories for Paul Temme

Date Pilot Name Unit Enemy A/C Type Height Time Location
15-May-40 Paul Temme Stab I./JG2 Potez 63   16.00 S Sedan
26-May-40 Paul Temme Stab I./JG2 2000m 17.05 SW Calais
26-May-40 Paul Temme Stab I./JG2   09.36 SW Calais
02-Aug-40 Paul Temme Stab I./JG2   11.05 North of Le Havre
11-Aug-40 Paul Temme Stab I./JG2   11.37 SE Portsmouth
13-Aug-40 Paul Temme Stab I./JG2      

Luftwaffe pilot Helmut Wick

Helmut Wick was born in Mannheim on 5 August 1915. He was one of three children and, because his father's work as an engineer involved frequent moves, the family lived variously in Heidelberg, Hannover, Danzig and Konigsberg. At one of these locations, the family home was near an airfield where the sight and sound of the aircraft fascinated Helmut and remained one of his most vivid childhood memories. Despite this early interest in aviation however, he first studied to become a forester but later, when the air force began calling for recruits, his enthusiasm for aviation was reawakened and, in March 1935, Helmut volunteered for service with the Luftwaffe.On 6 April 1936, Helmut Wick was a Fahnenjunker and by July 1937 had been promoted to Fahnrich, both terms referring to ranks for officer cadets. Because of his mental and physical qualities, he was recommended for fighter pilot training and later joined I./JG135 (later I./JG51) commanded by Oberst Max Ibel.At the end of 1938 Wick transferred to I./JG133 (the future I./JG53), then based in Wiesbaden under Major Hans-Hugo Witt, and on 1 January 1939 Lt. Wick was posted to the I.Staffel of JG133. This Staffel was commanded by Hptm. Werner Molders, one of the best fighter leaders, and even at the height of his fame Wick would never forget that he had learned all he knew from Molders.Early Victories On 30 August 1939, Wick was transferred to Hptm. Hennig Strumpell's 3./JG2 based in Berlin/Doberitz and when war broke out against Poland on 1 September, this unit remained to protect Berlin. In early November, the Staffel was transferred to Rebstock, behind the Siegfried Line, and during the so-called 'Phoney War', was engaged daily in long patrol flights over the Franco-German border. It was during one such flight, on 22 November that Wick claimed his first victory. As the French were reluctant to cross the border, Wick's formation flew to the Nancy area where they became involved in a fight with some Curtiss Hawk 75A-1s and Wick succeeded in shooting down the aircraft flown by Sgt. Pierre Saillard of GC II/4 which crashed near Phalsbourg. Further border patrol flights continued, but during the winter months there were fewer encounters although on 30 April 1940, Lt. Wick, together with Lt. Rudolf Pflanz and Oblt. Jobst Hauenschild became involved in a combat with a Potez 63.11 east of Merzig. The three pilots put in a joint claim but it was apparently awarded to Lt. Pflanz.It was during the campaign in the West that Wick began his career as one of the Luftwaffe's greatest aces, though only after a slow start. Although his Staffel comrades had scored victories, Wick was unlucky and found himself unable to manoeuvre into a sufficiently favourable position.

It seems his luck might have changed on 17 May when Wick claimed three LeO-451 bombers, but in fact none of his claims was confirmed. Wick's next large battle came on IS May when his Staffel claimed six Blenheims, but again Wick himself was unable to score. Finally, on the 20th 3./JG2 again became involved in a battle with LeO 451 bombers in the Laon-St.Quentin-Peronne area and two of the Staffel's seven claims were awarded to Wick.At the end of May, Wick claimed two Fairey Swordfish in the Calais area and although one forced landed at Calais-Marck and the other crashed into the sea in flames, these were not confirmed due to a lack of witnesses. However, any disappointment was soon forgotten in the events of 5 June. Wick was flying with Oblt. Hauenschild when they attacked some 15 to 20 Bloch 151s.The first kill went to Oblt. Hauenschild who shot one down at 17.10 hrs, but within a few minutes Wick had shot down another three. Five minutes later, on the way home, Wick accounted for a Morane-Saulnier 406 and was welcomed as a hero. Never since the war began had anyone claimed four victories in a single flight.Thereafter, Wick's score increased regularly.

On 6 June he shot down two Bloch I5Is near Compiegnes and on the evening of the 8th Wick destroyed another Bloch 151's and a Morane 406 in the Soissons-Reims area. His 12th confirmed victory, a Blenheim near Soissons on 9 June made Wick the leading ace in the 'Richthofen' Geschwader and brought the award of the EK 1. Wick's last confirmed victory of the campaign, a Fairey Battle shot down near Montdidier-Provins, occurred at 21.10 hrs on 13 June. A Spitfire claimed on 17 June was not confirmed and Wick therefore ended the French campaign with 13 confirmed victories, placing him fourth on the list of highest-scoring German pilots.At the same time, 1./JG2, which then had a total of 123 Abschusse, was restructured. In the 3.Staffel, Hptm. Hennig Striimpell became Gruppenkommandeur, Hptm. Alexander von Wintergeldt became Staffelkapitan of 8./JG2, Oblt. Hauenschild was transferred to another unit and, on 23 June 1940, Wick became Staffelfuhrer of 3./JG2.After a short rest following the fighting in France, Wick and his pilots were looking forward to increasing the Staffel's score, but although the Geschwaderstab and I.Staffel claimed two Spitfires on 9 July, most missions were convoy protection sorties and the situation was generally quiet.

Then, on 17 July, Wick took off with his wingman, Lt. Franz Fiby, to intercept a Blenheim returning to England after a mission over France. Despite a chase, the two pilots were unable to catch the Blenheim and broke off to establish where they were. Through a hole in the clouds, they saw that, although at that time forbidden, they had flown over the English coast. Nevertheless, Wick decided he would try to find something to shoot down before returning and after a search, Wick and Fiby saw below them the 14 Spitfires of 64Sqn. with one aircraft flying some distance behind acting as 'Holzauge' 1. Wick attacked and shot down this lone Spitfire leaving its wounded pilot, F/O Donald Taylor, to crash-land at Hailsham.With the start of the Battle of Britain, victories followed quickly and 11 July proved to be a very successful day for I. and III./JG2 which claimed 20 victories, Wick claiming a Hawk 752 and two Spitfires. On 21 July, Wick was promoted Oberleutnant and on 1 August was officially appointed Staffelkapitan of 3./JG2. After claiming two apparently unconfirmed Hurricanes on 16th and 24 August, Wick then claimed a Hurricane and a Spitfire near Portland on 25 August and two Hurricanes near Portsmouth on 26th. This brought Wick's total to 21 victories, and on the 27th he was awarded the Ritterkreuz, this being presented on the 29th at Karinhall by Reichsmarschall Goring who also granted Wick four days' leave to spend with his wife and family.Returning to the front, Wick claimed two Hurricanes on 4 September and by the 7th he had claimed a further five victories although only four were confirmed. On the same day, Wick was promoted to Hauptmann and became Gruppenkommandeur of I./JG2. Hptm.Wick's predecessor, Hptm.

Strumpell recalled:'I was assigned to fafu Osterkamp and turned the Gruppe over to Hptm. Wick. He was a nice man and 1 knew him well. He flew on every operation and was aggressive in combat. This could not be sustained and one day 1 told him that he would mentally or physically collapse or that he would be shot down. He always fought at full throttle to get the most speed from his aircraft and once I told Wick's mechanics to change his engine because of this.'

A Meeting with the Fuhrer

By the end of September, Wick had claimed another nine Abschusse and another five in two missions flown on 5 October, bringing his total to 41 official victories. That evening, he received a telephone call informing him that the Reichsmarschall wanted to see him the next day at the RLM. Wick had just 15 hours to trdvel to Berlin and he and his friend Oblt. Pflanz drove throughout the night in order to be on time. It was clear that Wick would received the Oak Leaves to his Knight's Cross, but tantalisingly, during a meal with Goring, Generalfeldmarschall Milch, Generaloberst Udet and Generals Bodenschatz and Student, no mention was made of the Eichenlaub.At the end of the meal, Goring finally said, 'Now, my dear Wick, you are to take a special train to Berchtesgarten where somebody is waiting for you! 'Thus, on 6 October, the Fuhrer welcomed Wick and personally presented him with the Oak Leaves. At the same time Hitler promoted him to Major, making him the youngest man of that rank in the Wehrmacht.Back with his Gruppe, Major Wick claimed a Spitfire shot down on 15 October. On the 20th Goring declared, 'The Fuhrer has promoted him to Major, I promote him to Kommodore', and within a few days the existing Kommodore, Major Wolfgang Schellmann had left to succeed Major Bernhard Woldenga as commander of JG27.Major Hannes Trautloft, former Kommodore of JG54, knew Wick and recalled:

'Despite all his awards and honours, Wick remained a modest and considerate superior and wasrespected and admired by all his pilots. One day, a General, the commander of the Fliegerschule at Dresden, hoping to profit from the experiences of his former pupil, visited the 'Richthofen' Geschwader on the Channel coast with some of his staff. Engaging the young Kommodore in conversation, the General boasted, 'My dear Wick, of course I knew at Dresden that you would become someone special', to which Wick replied, 'Herr General, I suppose that's why you failed me on the first officer candidate test.'' Even as Kommodore, Wick continued to fly and lead his men.

On 29 October near Portsmouth he claimed a Hurricane at 15.29 hrs and a Spitfire four minutes later. Three more claims followed on 5 November, five on the 6th one of the 7th one on the 8th and another, apparently unconfirmed, on the 10th. By the morning of 28 November 1940, Major Helmut Wick had 54 victories, the same number as the Kommodore ofJG51, Obstlt. Molders, and close behind the 56 of Obstlt. Adolf Galland. At 14.20 hrs that afternoon, Wick ledJG2 in a sweep over Southern England and 50 minutes later claimed his 55th victory, a Spitfire north-east of the Isle of Wight.After returning to its base, JG2 took off at 16.30 hrs on the second mission of the day, destined to be the Kommodore's last. Visibility was good as the Jagdgeschwader Richthofen climbed in the direction of the Isle of Wight with Major Wick, his wingman Oblt. Pflanz and the Stab flight in the lead. After about 40 minutes, JG2 was again near the Isle of Wight where the Stab became involved in a large air battle and Wick shot down a Spitfire of 609Sqn. killing the pilot, P/O Paul Baillon. It was the Kommodore's last victory and his last flight. The accompanying accounts, one by Lt. Julius Meimberg of 4./JG2 and the other an official Luftwaffe report (opposite), describe in detail what is known of Major Wick's last flight, but it seems almost certain that after shooting down P/O Baillon, Wick was shot down by 609Squadron's F/Lt John Dundas, and that almost immediately afterwards Dundas himself was attacked and shot down by Wick's wingman, Oblt. Pflanz.Subsequently, the Luftwaffe did everything possible to locate Wick. Many search flights were made and even the British authorities were contacted 3 to enquire if they had a certain Major Helmut Wick among their PoWs, but no trace of him, his dinghy or his aircraft have ever been found.

The next day, Wick's closest friends, Oblt. Pflanz and Oblt. Erich Leie, traveled to Berlin to inform Wick's wife and parents of the tragedy.Many theories have been put forward to account for Wick's death. Hptm. Strumpell was convinced that Wick was an easier target because his engine was suffering from wear and tear and was not giving him top peRGormance, while some historians believe he may have collided with debris from Baillon's Spitfire. Equally possible is that Wick was by now suffering from severe nervous strain, a view perhaps supported by the errors of judgement he displayed during the flight to Brest on 17 October and his diary entry of 6 November 1940 in which he wondered if he was not well or if his nerves were frayed. Certainly Hptm. Strumpell thought that if it was not a poorly peRGorming engine which led to his death then it may have been the pressure he was under to become the Luftwaffe's leading ace 4. The fame and hero-worship the Third Reich meted out to its warriors and the rivalry that the news media fostered between them may well have raised public morale and enhanced the general esprit de corps of fellow fighter pilots but, equally, such exploitation also cruelly encouraged young men to exert themselves beyond their capabilities. Although Major Wick did not acquire the same reputation as Galland or Molders and although some of his contemporaries doubted the accuracy of his score, he is fondly remembered by the few surviving members of JG2 for his humanitarian qualities, his kind manner and enthusiasm for life.F/Lt John Charles Dundas of 609Sqn., the pilot who is believed to have shot down Wick and who was himself then shot down by Oblt. Rudolf Pflanz.

LOSS OF MAJOR WICK

Copy, telex
To: Robinson, Command Staff lc Luftflotte 3,
V. Fliegerkorps
7Jafli 3
 
On 28.11.40 the second mission for JG2 was an assignment to fly a fighter sweep in the area of Southampton-Isle of Wight-Portsmouth. Assigned to the Geschwader was one flight from II./JG77. A total of 38 aircraft took off from Cherbourg-West and Thevil1e. JG2 took off at 16.30 hrs and climbed to 4,000 metres near the coast. Flying a course towards the Isle of Wight, the unit had climbed to 10,500 metres by the time they reached the English coast. The experience of the first mission of the day, when English combat units had flown at altitudes exceeding 11,000 metres, dictated that this altitude be flown in order to intercept the enemy. The weather was clear throughout the day and visibility was more than 100 km.The command flight, consisting of Major Wick, Oblt. Leie, Oblt. Pflanz, and Lt. Fiby, was approaching the English coast at 10,200 metres when a Spitfire squadron was sighted flying at 8,500-9,000 metres in the direction of Portsmouth and climbing. Major Wick positioned himself to attack this squadron. In the meantime the staff flight had become greatly separated from the rest of the formation since the Kommodore flew at full throttle in order to reach the English. Major Wick had to turn left so that the two wingmen on the left could also get into attack position but Oblt. Leie, on the right, was forced further out. Major Wick was able to carry out his attack on the English squadron without distraction and scored his 56th air victory. Two Spitfires flying cover behind, to the right and 500 metres above this squadron were evidently not noticed by Major Wick. Both of these Englishmen saw Wick's attack and thus the rest of the staff flight was prevented from making an attack on these two Spitfires which escaped to safety by carrying out a Split-S maneuver.After the Kommodore attacked the Spitfire squadron, he pulled up left into the sun. The staff flight was attempting to follow when Wick was suddenly attacked from a superior altitude by about 20-30 Spitfires.

Here, Oblt. Leie was able to get into firing position behind a solitary Englishman but he thereby lost sight of the other two aircraft of the staff flight. Oblt. Pflanz and Lt. Fiby escaped the English attack by diving away and lost sight of each other. At about 2,000 metres Oblt. Pflanz saw two aircraft in front of him which were flying south. He contemplated joining these two aircraft but recognised one as an English aircraft which was turning left and followed him. At this moment Oblt. Pflanz noticed a parachute* at about 1,500 metres. Oblt. Pflanz positioned himself behind the Englishman and shot him down from a short distance. He observed the aircraft hit the sea at tremendous speed and saw both wings break off.Flying home immediately afterwards, Oblt. Pflanz called the Sea Rescue Service which responded after several calls. He gave the position as: '40-50 km SSW western tip Isle of Wight, one German baled out, one Englishman in immediate vicinity.' As the Rescue Service acknowledged the position, there developed a radio communication between another department and the rescue boat which stated it was 60 nautical miles from the scene and that the rescue centre at Cherbourg-West had been asked to send another boat to assist. Afterwards, since he was running short of fuel, Oblt. Pflanz had to land (at Bonneborg, 18 km. NW of Lisieux), and he returned to his unit two hours later. After landing, Oblt. Leie determined by communicating with other commands that the Kommodore was the only one from the mission who had not returned and that he had not landed at any other airfield on the Channel coast. This was reported to Jafu 3 (Major Beck) and the la (Operations Officer) of the command of the V. Fliegerkorps with the most urgent request to set into operation all possible assistance in the search for Major Wick.JGRichthofen No.2*

There is no evidence that the parachute - if one was observed - was Wick's. Indeed, Kurt Buhligen and other pilots have stated that they saw Wick dead in his cockpit.

1. German term equivalent to 'Tail End Charlie'.
2. Clearly a case of misidentification.
3. The British replied two days later stating they had no knowledge of Wick's whereabouts.
4. Some historians maintain that at about 16.00 hrs on 28 November, JG2 received a telephone call from JG26 stating that Adolf Galland had added to his score and that Wick only flew his second sortie that day because he wanted to remain in the lead.

'We Waited in vain until late into the night'

Julius Meimberg, STAFFELKAPITAN OF 4./JG2In the late aternoon of 28 November 1940, we took off from Beaumont.le-Roger for our second, mission of the day. It was a brigh, clear, late-Autumn day and Jagdgescbwader 'Richthofen' climbed in the direction of the Isle of Wight with the Kommodore, Major Wick, his wingman Oblt. Rudolf Pflanz and the rest of the stab fight in the lead.I was leading the two flights of the 4.Staffel behind the Geschwader Stab. We reached 7000 metres and visibility was excellent. Diagonally, below us lay the Isle of Wight and beyond, the green fields of England began to appear. Above us, a large number of contrails flew towards us1. It was a beautiful sight, but we had no time to enjoy it as the straight, white plumes arced straight towards us and then dissolved into nothing as they lost height and turned into, small, flashing specks. It was a formation of Spitfires. They had the advantage of height and they were attacking from a favourable position.Major Wick had the habit of flying at full throttle while in combat. The Stab flight tried to follow, climbing at full power, but it was impossible and the flight became spread out. I climbed, with the 4. Staffel somewhat staggered to one side, trying to achieve a good position yet at the same time hold the formation together. I had no way of knowing whether there were more Spitfires closing with us from below the contrail height and which would be difficult to see. Then we were attacked, the aircraft of the Staffel separated and the dogfight began.

I saw a single Spitfire to one side and became involved in a turning contest but I was unable to position myself behind him. To allow sufficient lead I had to pull back on the stick so that the Spitfire disappeared under my nose, then I fired. When the Spitfire appeared again, I saw no visible evidence that I bad hit it but the aircraft made a steep Climbing turn and immediately went into a spin. I followed, thinking that this was some trick and that the pilot wanted me to think he'd been hit and would soon pull out, but he kept on spinning.If this had not been such a life and-death situation, I would have said that the sight before me was almost picturesque. It seemed that the red glow of the evening sun was reflecting off his canopy as the apparently undamaged green and brown camouflaged Spitfire spun towards the smooth dark surface of the sea below. It spun lower and lower, and I waited for the pilot to bale out but nothing happened. Then it occurred to me that even when the spinning Spitfire's canopy was in shadow, the cockpit still glowed red. Falling lower and lower towards the sparkling, blue-green mirror of the sea, the Spitfire finally disappeared in a white splash. I think the aircraft was burning inside and maintain that this is, possible when the oxygen cylinder is hit. I experienced something similar in 1943 'when I was shot down in Tunisia, but I never experienced another air combat such as this.Once we had landed, Rudolf Pfanz reported that Helmut Wick had shot down one Spitfire but had then been attacked by another which he, Pflanz, had shot down. No one was able to see what had happened to Wick's aircraft but we all hoped he had baled put and would return.We waited in vien until late into the night and he has been missing ever since.1 It should be noted that most accounts including the report submitted by JG2 on the loss of Wick state that the Spitfires were below the German aircraft.

Herr Hauptmann, we're flying into the ocean!'

Siegfried Bethke JG2.1 On October 1940, the I./JG2 'Richthofen' was based at Beaumont-le-Roger, about 40 km South-West of Rouen in Normandy. Shortly after noon we received orders to transfer to Brest for a special mission to be carried out the next day. This surprised us, since we had been expecting a fighter sweep or to escort bombers to the south coast of England, We had flown three months of hard, relentless missions, during which we had suffered extremely high casualties from British fighters, those in the past two weeks being especially nerve-wracking. Flying over the Channel was particularly telling on the nerves and quite a number of comrades had been lost after parachuting or ditching into the Channel, perhaps after only receiving a minor hit in the radiator. Despite the container of yellow dye attached to the life jacket and the one-man dinghy we all carried, the Seenotdienst had been unable to find them in the rough seas.But now we were in a cheeRGul mood. We had almost perfect weather with just a little haze, and it would be a pleasure to fly the 100km to Brest. The life jackets we had worn for the last three months could be discarded and we wouldn't even need our maps; we only had to fly westwards to the coast and there would be Brest. The whole thing was splendid and no one gave a thought to what the next day's special mission might entail.Although we had excellent service, personnel, our aircraft had recently been worked so hard that, from an establishment of 40 aircraft, the Gruppe assembled just 12 Bf 109s. We took off at 16.30 hrs with our Gruppenkommandeur, Hptm. Helmut Wick, in the lead. Wick had had a meteoric career and, three, days earlier, on the 14th had returned from Germany where he had been presented with the Oak Leaves by the Fuhrer himself that evening; he told us about the meetings and the discussions he'd had with Hitler while they travelled from Berchtesgaden to Berlin in the Fuhrer's special train. The Fuhrer, who contrary to rumors ate meat, and drank wine, spoke of many things; the U-boat war, aircraft production and the Italians, who were supposed to have relieved us but lost their way and wrote off half their aircraft in emergency landings. Hitler referred to 'Bloodhound Stalin' and said that sooner or later there would be a clash with Russia. England was to be smashed by the Luftwaffe alone but the weather conditions were never favorable enough. Next spring we would have the Bf 109F and, later, the Fw190. Meanwhile, 'Hptm. Wick was to be given command of a Geschwader, but at just 25 years of age the responsibility concerned him greatly.Because of the distance involved we flew in a long, loose formation. There were no Spitfires or Hurricanes to worry about and with the Kommandeur leading, we felt we could relax. For a long time we flew at 1,500 metres with nothing to do but follow Wick and occasionally check our instruments: water, oil temperature, pressures, revolutions, etc. For the old hands this was habitual and automatic. On we flew in complete radio silence. Some pilots in the formation hadn't even switched on their radios, and I had time to reflect on other matters. Three days earlier I had scored my ninth victory, a Hurricane over Southampton.

After my first burst of fire from very close behind, the Hurricane exploded and I had to swerve sharply to avoid the debris. But on the same mission I had lost one of my best pilots, the Staffel's seventh loss since the French campaign in May, and I hoped he was a prisoner and had not come down in the water. Weeks later, however, his naked body was washed ashore on the coast of the Cotentin peninsular. He could only be identified by his teeth.After the months of operations over England, this flight was a real pleasure, almost like a pre-war Sunday afternoon stroll. Occasionally I checked our course or the position of my Staffel in relation to the Stab flight. It soon became obvious that orientation over the western part of Normandy was very difficult as there were no prominent landmarks, a situation made worse by the hazy conditions. But we all had complete faith in Hptm. Wick, holder of the Oak Leaves and the third-most successful fighter pilot in the Luftwaffe after Molders and Galland.After half an hour on the same course I began to think that we should have reached Brest and wondered if Wick was taking us south which would explain why we wouldn't see the water before we reached our objective. Below, the countryside was confusing. There were no features which would allow us to orient ourselves, but I expected to see a landmark soon. When a large town, a city with railways, roads, a river and even a small airfield appeared, I wondered where it could be. No sign of the sea anywhere. We had then been flying for about three-quarters of an hour and soon the city disappeared behind us. Damn! We had learned to find our way about over England so we should have found out which city that was.Then it occurred to me that it might have been Rennes, in which case we were much further south than I thought. Wick must be flying to the south coast of Brittany so we could go sightseeing! Then the coast appeared beneath us and, expecting the Kommandeur to alter course, I was ready, waiting to increase speed in order to stay with him as he turned to the right. But I waited in vain. We had been flying for an hour on the same heading, and now there was nothing below but water. Ahead, in the haze, an island appeared. I looked at my map and wondered if this was Belle Ile, and whether Wick would use it as a turning point, but we continued to fly on. Now there was only the sea below us. Where were we going? What was Wick up to? This was completely incomprehensible. We had complete faith in him, of course especially since his meeting with the Fuhrer, but I grew increasingly anxious until the fear of the water and the fixed course caused me to think the unthinkable; perhaps the Kommandeur didn't realize where we were.

My eyes moved again to the map on my knee and to the endless water ahead. My mind raced and I realized beyond doubt that we were straight out into the Bay of Biscay! Once we reached the point of no return, none of us would regain land even if we did turn around. Fear for myself and my comrades finally overcame all misgivings and I became very calm. I estimated we had fuel left for only another five minutes' flight. Regardless of whether I'd embarrass myself or have to face disciplinary action, something had to be done, and with firm determination I pressed the transmit button on the radio.'Amboss from Wanne, Amboss from Wanne'1. We're flying out to sea. I'm turning round. No reaction. I repeated my message. Again nothing, either from the radio or in the movement of Wick's aircraft. No one had heard. They all had their radios turned off. I opened the throttle to close up with the Stab flight, drew alongside the Kommandeur and again found the courage to transmit: 'Herr Hauptmann, we're flying into the ocean! I'm turning back!' At the same time, I rocked my wings twice, right in front of his nose, and then banked tightly to the left and flew in the opposite direction. In order to reach land as soon as possible, I turned exactly through 180 degrees and, once on my new course, I looked around and, seeing that my own Schwarm had followed, closed the throttle again.

Our lives now depended on saving every drop of fuel. Once we four were together again, I glanced backwards and with enormous relief, saw the others turning steeply to follow us. Already I felt as if a huge weight had lifted from my mind, though I was still by no means certain that we would find anywhere to land, and the responsibility of leading the Gruppe to safety was a heavy burden. Belle Ile came into sight again and behind it, land. I made a left turn to fly north along the coast where conditions for an emergency landing were better.Slowly, for safety and better visibility, I gained height and soon spotted a landing field, but it turned out to have been ploughed up and had wire stretched in every direction to prevent it being used. It had probably been like that since the war with France in May and June. Then, further inland, ahead and to the right, I saw a larger town. This was probably Quimper, but did it have an airfield? I turned towards the town and there was an airfield. It was in good condition, too, with the landing cross perfectly situated and the wind blowing from the west, so we came straight in. Wheels down, flaps down, side-slip to lose height and we're bumping over the grass, first myself and my wingman, then my other pair. We rolled out to the end of the field to make way for the others who were close behind. One actually landed with his engine stopped and two more ran out of fuel as soon as they'd touched down. We'd had a lucky escape. Wick came up to me and thanked me profusely for preventing the flight ending in disaster.In the event, the mission from Brest was cancelled because of poor weather conditions. The plan had been for our destroyers to attack convoys in the Bristol Channel in order to draw out the Royal Navy, which was then to be attacked by Stuka's while we provided protective cover against English fighters.

Due to the bad weather we transferred back to Beaumont in pairs, but three pilots had to make emergency landings during which one was injured and another killed. My wingman and myself were flying low - not a wise thing to do considering the terrain in Normandy - and ran into a bank of low cloud. When pulling up, I somehow became disorientated and came out of the cloud almost on my back, righting the aircraft just in time. Another lucky escape!Wick was unable to explain exactly what had happened but like everyone else, probably believed, that with no enemy fighters or weather problems, the flight would just be a routine hour in the air. However, he was exhausted from the recent months of combat and I believe he was so preoccupied with what he had learned while visiting the Fuhrer, that he allowed his thoughts, to wander. He therefore failed to notice he was a few degrees off course and, not realizing we had exceeded our intended flight time, continued to fly onwards while he pondered recent events and, perhaps, what the future held for him. Only two months earlier he had been a mere Leutnant but his successes had brought rapid promotion. Now the prospect of taking command of a Geschwader worried and he felt too young for such a responsibility.

Nevertheless, a few days later, Wick was promoted to Major and became Kommodore of the jagdgeschwader 'Richthofen'. On 29 November, I wrote in my diary, 'Kommodore hit by an Englishman yesterday, baled out near Isle of Wight. Search resumed this morning. Heavy sea - found nothing. Hopefully the English picked him up'. But on 7 December I wrote, 'Major Wick definitely missing - not in captivity. Goring has made enquiries in England... Wick is lost'.Out of respect for Wick, his exceptional career and his recent decoration by Hitler, we all arrived at an unspoken agreement and no word of our near fatal flight into the ocean ever trickled out. For myself, I was just satisfied with the outcome of this experience and pleased to receive the heart felt gratitude of the other pilots.

Luftwaffe pilot Major Helmut Wick

Major Helmut Wick was born on 5 August 1915 at Mannheim. On completion of his schooling, he began training as a forestry worker. Wick joined the new Luftwaffe in 1935. By April 1936, he had received the rank of Fahnenjunker and by July 1937, he had been promoted to the rank of Fähnrich. On completion of his training, Wick was assigned to II./JG134 flying Arado Ar 68 biplane fighters. He was commissioned with the rank of Leutnant on 1 September 1938. In January 1939, Wick was transferred to 1./JG53, flying the ,Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighter under the command of Werner Mölders (115 victories, RK-Br, killed in flying accident 22 November 1941). Wick was transferred to JG2 on 30 August 1939. Leutnant Wick was assigned to 3./JG2 and served with the unit in the air defence of Berlin during the Polish Campaign. He recorded his and the Geschwader's first victory on 22 November 1939, when he shot down a French Hawk 75 fighter near Strasbourg, piloted by ace Adjutant Camille Plubeau (14 victories) of GC II/4, Armée de l'Air, who crash-landed, wounded. On 10 May, 3./JG2 was relocated to the western front but Wick remained behind while his aircraft underwent an engine change. He finally arrived at the front on 21 May. Wick was particularly successful during the French campaign recording 12 confirmed and two unconfirmed victories, including four French fighters shot down on 5 June to record his fourth through seventh victories and his 10th victory shot down on 8 June. The two unconfirmed victories related to two Royal Navy Swordfish torpedo bomber biplanes shot down at the end of May for which he had no witnesses.Wick was to have continued success during the Battle of Britain. He was appointed Staffelkapitän of 3./JG2 on 1 August 1940, although he had been leading the unit since 23 June.He recorded his 19th and 20th victories on 25 August and on 26 August claimed a further two to take his score 22. For this feat, Oberleutnant Wick was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 27 August 1940.

On 4 September 1940, Wick received promotion to the rank of Hauptmann and took command of 6./JG2.He added six further victories with this unit to raise his victory total to 28. Wick was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of I./JG2 on 9 September. On 5 October, he shot down five RAF fighters in the Isle of Wight area (37-41). This gained him the immediate award of the Eichenlaub (Nr 4). Further promotion followed and, at 25 years of age, Wick was the youngest Major in the Wehrmacht. Wick was appointed Kommodore of JG2 on 20 October 1940, succeeding Major Wolfgang Schellmann (25 victories, RK) who had left to command JG27. On 6 November, Wick claimed five RAF fighters shot down (48-52). On 28 November 1940, Wick achieved his 55th victory during an early sortie to become the leading fighter ace in the world. Later in the day, on a 'Freie Jagd' over the English Channel, Wick scored his 56th victory, a Spitfire. In turn, his aircraft was shot down by British ace Flight Lieutenant John Dundas (13.333 confirmed, 2 probable and 4.5 damaged victories) of 609 Squadron, RAF. Wick was seen to bale out of Bf 109E-4 (W.Nr. 5344) 'Black <-+-' over the Channel, his 'Geschwaderstab Schwarm' mate Hauptmann 'Rudi' Pflanz (52 victories, RK, killed in action 31 July 1942) circled the area calling over the radio that a 'Spitfire was down' hoping to attract the British air/sea rescue. Pflanz continued to circle until his fuel was almost empty, crash-landing at landfall on his return over the Channel but Wick was never found.Helmut Wick was credited with 56 victories achieved flying 168 combat missions.
In his score are 24 Spitfires.

Luftwaffe pilot List of aerial victories for Major Helmut Wick

No Date Time A/c Type Unit Location / Comments
1 22.11.1939 12:20 Hawk-75 3./JG2 Bitsch-Phalsbourg-Saare / Possibly H-75A (No 95) of GC II/4 flown by Adj Camille Plubeau (14 victories), crash-landed, wounded
2 20.5.1940 14:00 LeO 451 3./JG2 Cambrai-St. Quentin
3 20.5.1940 14:05 LeO 451 3./JG2 Cambrai-St. Quentin
4 5.6.1940 17:17 Bloch 151 3./JG2 Ham-Péronne
5 5.6.1940 17:20 Bloch 151 3./JG2 Ham-Péronne
6 5.6.1940 17:25 Bloch 151 3./JG2 Ham-Péronne
7 5.6.1940 17:30 Morane 406 3./JG2 Ham-Péronne
8 6.6.1940 12:17 Bloch 151 3./JG2 Ham-Péronne
9 6.6.1940 12:26 Bloch 151 3./JG2 Ham-Péronne
10 8.6.1940 21:00 Bloch 151 3./JG2 SW Soissons
11 8.6.1940 21:10 Morane 406 3./JG2 SW Soissons
12 9.6.1940 21:35 3./JG2 NE Soissons / Blenheim of 107Sqn, RAF
13 13.6.1940 21:10 Battle 3./JG2 Montdidier-Provins
14 17.7.1940 15:07 3./JG2 Hailsham (Brighton) / Spitfire (P9507) of 64Sqn, RAF flown by F/O D Taylor, crash-landed
15 11.8.1940 11:30 Hawk-75 3./JG2 E Weymouth / Hurricane I (V7233) 'LV-K' of 87Sqn, RAF flown by P/O JR Cock (10.75/4/5 victories), baled out
16 11.8.1940 11:34 3./JG2 -
17 11.8.1940 11:45 3./JG2 40km in front Portland
18 16.8.1940 14:35 3./JG2 E Portsmouth
19 25.8.1940 18:25 3./JG2 Portland
20 25.8.1940 18:30 3./JG2 Portland
21 26.8.1940 17:30 3./JG2 Portsmouth
22 26.8.1940 17:35 3./JG2 Portsmouth
23 5.9.1940 16:10 6./JG2 -
24 6.9.1940 9:50 6./JG2 -
25 7.9.1940 18:25 6./JG2 -
26 8.9.1940 13:20 6./JG2 -
27 8.9.1940 13:30 6./JG2 -
28 8.9.1940 13:40 6./JG2 -
29 25.9.1940 14:30 Stab I./JG2 -
30 26.9.1940 17:40 Stab I./JG2 -
31 27.9.1940 13:00 Stab I./JG2 -
32 28.9.1940 14:40 Stab I./JG2 -
33 30.9.1940 12:30 Stab I./JG2 -
34 30.9.1940 12:35 Stab I./JG2 -
35 1.10.1940 11:40 Stab I./JG2 -
36 1.10.1940 11:45 Stab I./JG2 S Swanage
37 5.10.1940 14:58 Stab I./JG2 S Bournemouth / Hurricane of 607Sqn, RAF
38 5.10.1940 15:00 Stab I./JG2 Bournemouth / Hurricane of 607Sqn, RAF
39 5.10.1940 15:03 Stab I./JG2 Bournemouth / Hurricane of 607Sqn, RAF
40 5.10.1940 18:35 Stab I./JG2 E Isle of Wight / Hurricane of 238Sqn, RAF
41 5.10.1940 18:40 Stab I./JG2 E Isle of Wight / Hurricane of 238Sqn, RAF
42 15.10.1940 13:45 Stab I./JG2 Portsmouth
43 29.10.1940 15:29 Stab/JG2 Portsmouth
44 29.10.1940 15:33 Stab/JG2 Portsmouth
45 5.11.1940 14:35 Stab/JG2 NE Portland
46 5.11.1940 14:37 Stab/JG2 NE Portland
47 5.11.1940 14:40 Stab/JG2 NE Portland
48 6.11.1940 15:35 Stab/JG2 Southampton / Hurricane (V7602) 'AD-D' of 151Sqn, RAF flown by Sgt HH Adair, killed
49 6.11.1940 15:37 Stab/JG2 Southampton
50 6.11.1940 15:45 Stab/JG2 E Isle of Wight
51 6.11.1940 15:46 Stab/JG2 E Isle of Wight
52 6.11.1940 15:48 Stab/JG2 E Isle of Wight
53 7.11.1940 15:25 Stab/JG2 S Portsmouth
54 10.11.1940 15:43 Stab/JG2 E Portsmouth
55 28.11.1940 15:10 Stab/JG2 NE Isle of Wight
56 28.11.1940 17:13 Stab/JG2 Bournemouth / Spitfire I (R6631) 'PR-O' of 609Sqn, RAF flown by P/O PA Baillon, killed

Victories : 56
Awards : Ritterkreuz (27 August 1940)
Eichenlaub (6 October 1940)
Units : JG134, JG53, JG2 http://www.luftwaffe.cz/wick.html  Aces of the Luftwaffe - Helmut Wick

CC-Jagdwaffe Vol.2 Section 1:Battle of Britain Phase 1 - Jul 1940 - Aug 1940
CC-Jagdwaffe Vol.2 Section 2:Battle of Britain Phase 2 - Aug 1940 - Sep 1940
CC-Jagdwaffe Vol.2 Section 3:Battle of Britain Phase 3 - Sep 1940 - Oct 1940
CC-Jagdwaffe Vol.2 Section 4:Battle of Britain Phase 4 - Nov 1940 - Jun 1941

SERVICE:
Joined the new Luftwaffe, 1935. Commissioned Leutnant, 1938. Advanced training under Werner Moelders. Assigned to II/JG134 flying the Arado Ar 68 biplane.
Transferred to I/JG53 flying the ,Messerschmitt Bf 109, January 1939.
Transferred to I/JG2, September 1939 in air defense of Berlin during the Polish Campaign. First two kills over France May 22, 1940. On June 9, 1940 became the leading ace of the Richthofen Geschwader with his 12th air victory, awarded the Eiserne Kreuz I (Iron Cross, First Class) and was promoted to Staffelkapitan 3. Staffel/JG2. Wick scored the 250th victory of JG2 and was also awarded the Ritterkreuz (Knight's Cross), Aug. 27, 1940. Promoted to Hauptmann and Gruppenkommandeur of I Gruppe/JG2 on Sept. 9, 1940. With his score to 41 air victories, Wick was awarded the Ritterkreuz mit Eichenlaub (Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves) on Oct. 5, 1940. Promoted Major and Kommodore of JG2 'Richthofen', succeeding Major Wolfgang Schellmann who left to command JG27. Wick shot down his 55th victory during an early sortie on Nov. 28, 1940 to become the leading fighter ace in the world. Later in the day, on a 'Freie Jagd' over the English Channel, Wick scored his 56th victory, a Spitfire. In turn his aircraft was shot down by Battle of Britain ace Flt. Lt. John Dundas of 609 Squadron, RAF. Wick was seen to bale out over the Channel, his 'Geschwaderstab Schwarm' mate Hptm. Rudi Pflanz circled the area calling over the radio that a 'Spitfire was down' hoping to attract British air/sea rescue. Pflanz continued to circle until his fuel was almost empty, crash-landing at landfall on his return over the Channel but Wick was never found.

REMARKS:
Helmut Wick carried his famous personal 'Horrido!' emblem of a Gold or Yellow broad sword on a Blue field pennant. This was originally the emblem of 3. Staffel/ JG2 and represented the Swedish ancestry of the Staffelkapitän Hennig Stümpel. As Gruppenkommandeur, Wick's I/JG2 had an inspection by Feldmarshall Sperrle who chastised Wick for the untidiness of the crew personnel. As this was at the height of the Battle of Britain, Wick angrily defended the crews relating that involved in their long hours they had no time to get 'a damned haircut.' which was 'the last word'.'As long as I can shoot down the enemy, adding to the honor of the Richthofen Geschwader and the success of the Fatherland, I will be a happy man. I want to fight and die fighting, taking with me as many of the enemy as possible.'

Helmut Wick (source; http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/LRG/wick.html) Helmut Wick was born on August 5th 1915 in Mannheim, Germany, and after his education he joined the Luftwaffe in 1935 and by 1938 had been promoted with the rank of a Commissioned Leutnant. He learnt much during this period as his advanced training as a fighter pilot was under the instruction of the famous pilot, Werner Mölders, who himself achieved much success in combat over the coming years Wick's first posting was flying the Arado Ar 68 biplane with II/JG134 before finally converting to the ,Messerschmitt Bf 109 in January 1939 when he was posted to I/JG53. He remained with this unit until September that year when Germany invaded Poland and he was subsequently posted to I/JG2, a unit tasked with the defence of Berlin During the period known as the 'Phoney-War' Wick claimed his first victory and also that of the fighter wing, I/JG2, when he shot down a French Curtiss Hawk on November 22nd 1939. Remaining with the unit he was moved to the western front where the Battle of France was underway, during May 1940. On May 17th he engaged and shot down three Curtiss Hawk's after he and 3 other Bf 109's were attacked by a large formation of the French fighters. By the end of the Battle of France in June 1940, Wick had achieved 14 confirmed kills and 2 unconfirmed. He was awarded the Eiserne Kreuz I (Iron Cross, 1st class) along with promotion to Staffelkapitan.Throughout the Battle of Britain Wick rose quickly in rank and in profile as a public figure back home in Germany. This was due to his outstanding qualities in leadership as a fighter pilot and his continual success in combat. During his first combat over England, he claimed 3 Spitfires on the same sortie and on August 27th he received the Ritterkreuz (Knights Cross) for achieving 20 victories. He shot down 2 Hurricanes on August 30th the first of No: 253 Squadron flown by Pilot Officer Jenkins, over Surrey and the second of No: 43 Squadron flown by Sergeant Noble over Sussex. Both the RAF pilots were killed On September 9th he was promoted to Gruppenkommandeur of I Gruppe/JG2 and on October 6th was awarded the Ritterkreuz mit Eichenlaub (Knights Cross with Oak Leaves) after claiming his 42nd combat victory of the war. By now Helmut Wick had become the most successful fighter pilot of the Luftwaffe. At the end of the Battle of Britain he had been made a Major and Kommodore of JG2 As the battles over southern England continued into November 1940, so did his victories and his 55th came on November 28th to make him the highest scoring 'fighter-ace' in the world, at that time. It was later that same day, on another sortie, that Wick not only claimed his last victory but also lost his life During combat over the Solent and the Isle of Wight with Spitfires of No: 609 Squadron, Wick had claimed the Spitfire of Pilot Officer Baillon, who was killed, when two Spitfires subsequently attacked him. One was flown by Flight Lieutenant John Dundas of No: 609 Squadron (already an ace with 16 victories) and the other by the Polish pilot Sergeant Zygmunt Klein of No: 152 Squadron. To this day it is unclear as to which of these pilots fired the fatal shots as both were shot down and killed moments later With his aircraft stricken with damage, Wick baled out just south of the Isle of Wight and into the English Channel. His body was never recovered.

(source:http://www.jacksonharrison.co.uk/BoB2/Battle personnel/Profiles/Luftwaffe/wick.htm)

 

 Some of the most widely used Book References:

  • Jagdwaffe: Battle of Britain: Phase One: July-August 1940 (Luftwaffe Colours: Volume Two, Section 1) Paperback Eric Mombeek (Author), David Wadman (Author), Eddie J Creek (Author)
  • Jagdwaffe: Battle of Britain: Phase Two: August-September 1940 (Luftwaffe Colours: Volume Two, Section 2) Paperback Eric Mombeek (Author), David Wadman (Author), Martin Pegg (Author)
  • Jagdwaffe: Battle of Britain: Phase Three: September-October 1940 (Luftwaffe Colours: Volume Two, Section 3) Paperback Eric Mombeek (Author), David Wadman (Author), Martin Pegg (Author)
  • Jagdwaffe: Battle of Britain: Phase Four: November 1940-June 1941 (Luftwaffe Colours: Volume Two, Section 4) Paperback Eric Mombeek (Author), David Wadman (Author), Martin Pegg (Author)

 Some of the most widely used Magazine References:

  • Airfix Magazines (English) - http://www.airfix.com/
  • Avions (French) - http://www.aerostories.org/~aerobiblio/rubrique10.html
  • FlyPast (English) - http://www.flypast.com/
  • Flugzeug Publikations GmbH (German) - http://vdmedien.com/flugzeug-publikations-gmbh-hersteller_verlag-vdm-heinz-nickel-33.html
  • Flugzeug Classic (German) - http://www.flugzeugclassic.de/
  • Klassiker (German) - http://shop.flugrevue.de/abo/klassiker-der-luftfahrt
  • Le Fana de L'Aviation (French) - http://boutique.editions-lariviere.fr/site/abonnement-le-fana-de-l-aviation-626-4-6.html
  • Le Fana de L'Aviation (French) - http://www.pdfmagazines.org/tags/Le+Fana+De+L+Aviation/
  • Osprey (English) - http://www.ospreypublishing.com/
  • Revi Magazines (Czech) - http://www.revi.cz/